Lost Boys Found Oral Histories

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Date Range
2012 2012
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Contributors: Amparano, Julie, MacNeill, Harper, MacNeill, Harper

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Contributors: Amparano, Julie, MacNeill, Harper, MacNeill, Harper

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Contributors: MacNeill, Harper, Pelimona, Rubi

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Contributors: Amparano, Julie, Dut, Peter, MacNeill, Harper, et al.
Description: Peter is a lost boy of Sudan who has written a book titled Words of Wisdom from the Clan Chief Angon Guot Wethoou: Autobiography of Peter Dut son of Angon-Dhook

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Contributors: Amparano, Julie, Santino

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Created Date: 2012-10-07
Contributors: Gatyiel, Tut, Amparano, Julie, Morales, Arthur
Description: Tut is a former Lost Boy of Sudan who reported facing hunger, loss, and fear of uncertain death. Both of Tut's parents were killed by the Muslim government while he was out in a field tending to the cows.

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Contributors: Garang, James
Description: James Garang was thirteen years old when he left his village.

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Contributors: Buom, Joseph
Description: Joseph Buom was eleven years old when the Northern Arabs bombed his village.

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Contributors: David, Adol Buoth
Description: David Adol Buoth left his village when he was ten years old because he heard it was an attack by the Khartoum government.

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Contributors: Najat, Dahiya
Description: Najat Dahiya moved to the United States on February 6th, 2001.

“Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan.

These oral histories document the stories of the men and women who were separated from their families as children and driven out of their homeland during a bloody, generation-long civil war in Sudan that began in 1983. The brutal conflict claimed the lives of approximately 1.9 million people and displaced and orphaned nearly 23,000 Sudanese boys and girls, according the U.S. Committee for Refugees. The oral histories tell the story of children in time of war, divided communities and the resilience of the human spirit to find new beginnings.

This collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book. This is the project of ASU New College faculty member Julie Amparano, with the assistance of students Arthur Morales, Harper MacNeill and Sarah Manyiel. This work would not be possible without the support of the Arizona Humanities Council and the Social Justice Fund.