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Lost Boys Found Oral Histories


Date Range
2012 2017
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“Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
Amparano, Julie, Santino
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Abraham left his village when war broke out and without food it was difficult to survive. Along with other boys, he ate grass and learned to clean muddy water for drinking. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
Magot, Abraham Deng
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James Mut was seven years old when the Northern military attacked people in his village. He also walked for six months before arriving to Ethiopia. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
Mut, James
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Peter was seven years old when his village was attacked. He walked to the border of Ethiopia, Sudan and into Kenya where he lived for eight years. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
Ngor, Peter
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David was 12 years old when Arabs attacked his village. He walked for three months until he reached Ethiopia. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
Kuk, David
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Sam left Sudan when he was six years old. He also witnessed many people die when they tried to cross the Gilo river. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
"Kangaroo", Sam
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After Marko Kuol’s village was bombed, he walked with his older nephew to Ethiopia at the age of seven. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
Kuol, Marko
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Peter was seven years old when war broke out in Sudan in 1987. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

Contributors
Ajook, Peter
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In 1986, Paul left his village with his mom, two brothers and two sisters. As a family they walked to Wau which took a month. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

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Mook was born on December 20, 1966 in Abyei and came to Phoenix Arizona in 2002. “Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan. The collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book.

“Lost Boys Found” is an ongoing, interdisciplinary project that is collecting, recording and archiving the oral histories of the Lost Boys/Girls of Sudan.

These oral histories document the stories of the men and women who were separated from their families as children and driven out of their homeland during a bloody, generation-long civil war in Sudan that began in 1983. The brutal conflict claimed the lives of approximately 1.9 million people and displaced and orphaned nearly 23,000 Sudanese boys and girls, according the U.S. Committee for Refugees. The oral histories tell the story of children in time of war, divided communities and the resilience of the human spirit to find new beginnings.

This collection is a work-in-progress, seeking to record the oral history of as many Lost Boys/Girls as are willing, and will be used in a future book. This is the project of ASU New College faculty member Julie Amparano, with the assistance of students Arthur Morales, Harper MacNeill and Sarah Manyiel. This work would not be possible without the support of the Arizona Humanities Council and the Social Justice Fund.