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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Contributor
Date Range
2013 2018


Short fiction revolving around the Y2K scare, written from three perspectives. Explores the fear and uncertainty prevalent during the time and how it affected actions and relationships.

Contributors
Moore, Matthew Robert, Dalton, Kevin, Blasingame, James, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

21st Century Breakdown: The Influence of Social Media on New Bands in the 21st Century is a creative project that explores the development of social media in its relation to music and how, over time, it has impacted the music industry. More specifically, the documentary explains the significance of social media to new bands at this moment in time (2017), which is seen through the development of local Phoenix band The Breaking Pattern. The documentary follows The Breaking Pattern for a year from the release of their debut album to the early stages of their second album. The documentary reveals ...

Contributors
Bosselman, Haley Erin, Jacoby, Jim, Russell, Dennis, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Western consciousness relies on polarized social metaphors (e.g., science versus poetry) to apprehend reality. Polarity stands in contention with the dual consciousness of the Nahua ("Aztecs"), whose behaviors and practices reveal an overarching belief in oneness in duality. To illuminate the ways this clash of metaphors influenced the events of the Conquest of Mexico, I interpret the self-constituted metaphor of Nahua identity, the performed metaphor of human sacrifice, and the duality inherent in Nahuatl syntax.

Contributors
De Palo, Samantha Victoria, Humphrey, Ted, Horan, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Here at ASU, I am double majoring in Psychology and Film/Media Studies. As such, I wanted to combine my two majors for my thesis project. Therefore, I decide to analyze representations of mental illness as they are portrayed in the mass media, especially through film and television. Through this research, I determined a number of ways that the mass media often portray mental illness incorrectly, insensitively, or through sheer stereotypes that often contribute to stigma and prejudice against the mentally ill. Taking what I learned about these common representations, as well as my knowledge of screenwriting and psychological disorders, I ...

Contributors
Brunelli, Hannah James, Bernstein, Gregory, Mae, Lynda, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalytic theory proposes that the personality has three components, the id, superego, and ego. The id is concerned with pleasure and gain, the reason it is often identified as a human’s animalistic side. Additionally, the id does not consider social rules as closely and is the uncensored portion of the personality. The superego is the id’s opposite; the superego considers social expectations and pressures immensely, is more self-critical and moralizing. The ego mediates the id and superego, and is understood as the realistic expression of personality which considers both the “animal” and human. A Fractured Whole: A Collection ...

Contributors
Otte, Aneka, Sturges, Robert, Bryant, Jason, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

This thesis compares significant linguistic features of English and Bahasa Indonesia (BI) and examines possible effects of language transfer for Indonesians who speak English as a second language (L2). The thesis first presents a description of BI: 1) phonology (vowels, consonants, stress and intonation), 2) word order (SVO and other alternatives, relativization, nominalization, topicalization, questions), 3) the noun phrase (derivation of nouns, modifiers in noun phrases, demonstratives, plurals, personal pronouns), and 4) the verbal system (derivation of verbs, agreement, copulas, passive voice, negation, tense, adverbs, modals/auxiliaries). For the IRB-approved research study, the researcher interviewed ten Indonesians from diverse linguistic, cultural, ...

Contributors
Tappendorf, Rebecca Christine, Renaud, Claire, Suwarno, Peter, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

This thesis examines contemporary cinematic adaptations of the Ovidian Pygmalion story. The films Blade Runner (1981), Lars and the Real Girl (2007), Ruby Sparks (2012), and Her (2013) are analyzed. This thesis seeks to understand why this particular myth is so resonant in today’s popular culture and what this relevance reveals about modern society. The roles of female subjugation, sexualization, and relationship with technology will be major areas of concern. Research includes film criticism, Ovidian scholarship, and new advances in computer technology.

Contributors
Story, Sara Katherine, Corse, Taylor, Ellis, Lawrence, et al.
Created Date
2015-05
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A Monster in the House: Gothic and Victorian Representations of Female Madness explores female madness and mental illness as perceived by Gothic and Victorian society over the span of three literary works: The Fall of the House of Usher (1839); Jane Eyre (1847), and The Yellow Wallpaper (1892). Each text features a ‘mad’ female character--Madeline Usher (The Fall of the House of Usher), Bertha Mason (Jane Eyre), and Jane (The Yellow Wallpaper)--who symbolizes the vast inequality women of the mid-to-late 1900s endured. Each character challenges social and religious mores and subverts the established order of a sacrosanct, male-dominated perspective. In ...

Contributors
Artiano, Aubrie Ellen, Miller, April, Barnard, James, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1 million are children (ALA, 2014). An important factor in trying to curb the frequency of asthma attacks is education. Particular elements of asthma education include symptom recognition, self-management skills, correct administration, and understanding how medications are used to control asthma. A review of the literature shows that multimedia education holds some promise in increasing asthma-knowledge retention. This creative project involved the creation of an asthma-education video with a concomitant asthma-education ...

Contributors
Vanhkham, Sophia, Wells, Amanda, Stevens, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Synesthesia is a psychological phenomenon in which the stimulation of one sensory modality brings about a response from at least one other modality. There has now been about two centuries of official synesthesia research, yet the current era of study, about the 2000s on, has proven invaluable to our further understanding of how synesthesia works in our perceptive world. I myself have two forms of synesthesia: color-grapheme and lexical-gustatory. In this paper, I look back on my personal experience with synesthesia and review its history and its operational definitions and theories. I then aim to perform a small case study ...

Contributors
Gronewold, Sara Suzanne, Liss, Julie, Infurna, Frank, et al.
Created Date
2017-05