Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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Date Range
2013 2017

This study evaluated whether the Story Champs intervention is effective in bilingual kindergarten children who speak Spanish as their native language. Previous research by Spencer and Slocum (2010) found that monolingual, English-speaking participants made significant gains in narrative retelling after intervention. This study implemented the intervention in two languages and examined its effects after ten sessions. Results indicate that some children benefited from the intervention and there was variability across languages as well.

Contributors
Fernandez, Olga E, Restrepo, Laida, Mesa, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Early childhood language environment has an important effect on developmental language outcomes. Intervention and parent training for children who have speech and language delays often focuses on the implementation of strategies designed to enhance the language environment. With quantitative information on different aspects of the language environment, intervention and parent training can be better tailored to the needs of each child and can be made easier for parents to implement. This study uses the Language Environmental Analysis (LENA) system to explore differences in language environment across participants, settings (toddler group and home), and activities (general, outside, and organized playtime, story ...

Contributors
Glavee, Kelsey Marie, Scherer, Nancy, Greer, Dawn, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Preschoolers’ vocabularies are an important component of their receptive and expressive language skills. This study was designed to catalog preschoolers’ expressive vocabularies to provide an accurate estimate of how many words and which words seven preschoolers knew. In this study a LENA digital recorder was used to record language samples of the children (age range 40 months to 69 months) over 4-6 days. Their language samples were transcribed and individual root words were extracted. The children spoke an average of 1,698 unique words (range 1,522 – 1,957 words). There were 539 words produced by all of the children in the ...

Contributors
Stanovich, Laura Ashlee, Gray, Shelley, Restrepo, M. Adelaida, et al.
Created Date
2015-12

A New Approach to Bullying is an anti-bullying workbook designed for middle school aged students. It is intended to accompany an anti-bullying curriculum, teaching students who are being bullied how to deal with the instances as well as educating all students about the harmful effects of bullying behavior.

Contributors
Moakley, Katherine Rose Hodge, Howard, Pamela, Quinn, Paul, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

In this pilot study, the purpose was to determine if certain language interventions could help bilingual children reduce maze use and improve their story retell abilities. We used language intervention, Story Champs, and its Spanish version, Puente de Cuentos to help bilingual children improve their story retell abilities. We conducted the intervention over the course of three days in both Spanish and English. The children participated in three stories in each language each day. They also received a narrative measure before and after the intervention to measure gains in story ability and to measure maze use. Results of the study ...

Contributors
Whiteley, Aaron Kyle, Restrepo, Maria, Dixon, Maria, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

This thesis compared two measures of phonological assessment of children, Shriberg and Kwiatkowski’s 1980 Percentage of Correct Consonants (PCC) and Ingram’s 2002 Proportion of Whole Word Proximity (PWP). Two typically developing two-year-old children were initially studied, and then nine children with speech sound disorders. The children’s words were divided into four categories ranging from least complex to most complex. It was hypothesized that the measures would correlate with word simplicity. The hypothesis was supported for the two typically developing children, and for five of the children with speech sound disorders. The other four children with speech disorders, however, did not ...

Contributors
Knodel, Rebekah Katelyn, Ingram, David, Major, Roy, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Children's speech and language development is measured by performance on standardized articulation tests. Test items on these assessments, however, vary in length and complexity. Word complexity was compared across five articulation tests: the Assessment of Phonological Patterns-Revised (APP-R), the Bankson-Bernthal Test of Phonology (BBTOP), the Clinical Assessment of Articulation and Phonology (CAAP), the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation (GFTA), and the Assessment of Children's Articulation and Phonology (ACAP). Four groups of word complexity were used, using the dimensions of monosyllabic vs. multisyllabic words, and words with consonant clusters vs. words without consonant clusters. The measure of phonological mean length of utterance ...

Contributors
Sullivan, Katherine Elizabeth, Ingram, David, Bacon, Cathy, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

The objective of this study was to examine the universality of three coarticulatory processes: glide epenthesis, stop epenthesis, and intervocalic voicing of stops. Five contrastive languages were selected to test these processes. These languages included English, Spanish, Mandarin, Arabic, and Navajo. All languages varied in phonemic inventory, stress patterns, phonological processes, and syllabic constructs. 16 participants were selected with relatively limited English exposure based on questionnaire responses regarding their language history. The participants went through a series of trainings and tasks to elicit these coarticulatory processes in several phonemic contexts. Part 1 of the study attempted to elicit the processes ...

Contributors
Vasquez, Dominique Jagelka, Weinhold, Juliet, Ingram, David, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of word type, phonotactic probability, word frequency, and neighborhood density on the vocabularies of children with mild-to-moderate hearing loss compared to children with normal hearing. This was done by assigning values for these parameters to each test item on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (Version III, Form B) to quantify and characterize the performance of children with hearing loss relative to that of children with normal hearing. It was expected that PPVT IIIB scores would: 1) Decrease as the degree of hearing loss increased. 2) Increase as a function of ...

Contributors
Latto, Allison Renee, Pittman, Andrea, Gray, Shelley, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

When listeners hear sentences presented simultaneously, the listeners are better able to discriminate between speakers when there is a difference in fundamental frequency (F0). This paper explores the use of a pulse train vocoder to simulate cochlear implant listening. A pulse train vocoder, rather than a noise or tonal vocoder, was used so the fundamental frequency (F0) of speech would be well represented. The results of this experiment showed that listeners are able to use the F0 information to aid in speaker segregation. As expected, recognition performance is the poorest when there was no difference in F0 between speakers, and ...

Contributors
Stanley, Nicole Ernestine, Yost, William, Dorman, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.