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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Contributor
Date Range
2013 2018


Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003) is a cult-classic television show about Buffy Summers, a vampire slayer. As the slayer, her job is to protect the earth from monsters, vampires, and demons. Though she may protect the earth from the “bad guys”, she still finds time in the day to be a teenage girl who sneaks out of the house and desperately wants a date for prom. Despite being off the air for over 10 years, Buffy the Vampire Slayer fans are still thriving on various online platforms such as Tumblr, Deviantart, and AO3. As a fan of Buffy the Vampire ...

Contributors
Jones, Sofia Eleanor, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, Ingram-Waters, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2017-12

Several different queer feminist zines, along with the author’s experiences in queer feminist zine making, are examined using the lens of J. Jack Halberstam’s The Queer Art of Failure. Particular attention is paid to zines’ unique composition from a variety of unexpected sources, and their subsequent ability to act as counterhegemonic documents. Queer feminist zine makers’ critical engagement with the concept of community is also discussed.

Contributors
Pruett, Jessica Lynn, Switzer, Heather, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

This study examines Glamour magazine to determine the messages the publication sends to its readers and to evaluate if such messages align with modern feminist goals. The articles of Glamour’s 12 issues from the year of 2016 are analyzed using a framework adapted from previous research on women’s magazines. Articles are coded as either positive (feminist, anti-traditional, promotes equality) or negative (anti-feminist, traditional, promotes inequality). Distinct content themes (appearance, dating, home, self-development, career development, politics/world issues, and entertainment) are also examined individually. After the presentation of data, I examine my findings through a feminist lens to determine the nature of ...

Contributors
Allnatt, Libby Paige, Pucci, Jessica, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, et al.
Created Date
2017-12

This creative group project aims to bring visibility to the diversity of the LGBTQ+ community at Arizona State University by sharing the personal stories and opinions of people from across ASU’s rainbow spectrum. Created and produced by a gay couple that met in their first year dorm and a passionate ally, gAySU: Exploring Sparky’s Rainbow is a compilation of photos, videos, and stories from ASU students, faculty, and staff that identify with the LGBTQ+ community. When reflecting on their own journey over the past three years, gAySU’s creators recognized ASU can feel large with many pockets of communities, yet through ...

Contributors
King, Shay Scott, Hendricks, Brock, Hom, Claire, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

This paper looks at the impact sorority life has on the collegiate women at Arizona State University. Much of the content widely available regarding members of the Greek community is relatively negative and describes these organizations through a critical lens. Finding this content to be contrary to that of my own experience, I sought to analyze the effects the community had, specifically the effects of the sororities and sorority women at Arizona State University. The analysis began with a thorough review of the history of fraternities and sororities, as well as a short overview of the history of feminism. Through ...

Contributors
Golisch, Allison, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, Burke, Alison, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

With each new Disney princess being hailed as finally representing a strong, positive female role model, the images presented by older princesses come into question. This investigation delves into the messages put forth by the Disney princess films and the way in which these ideas are developed within each of their movies. By defining the core of feminism to revolve around agency and the freedom of choice available to the women in the films, each princess’ adherence to feminist values was analyzed. All current and expected Disney princesses were evaluated (Snow White, Cinderella, Aurora, Ariel, Belle, Jasmine, Pocahontas, Mulan, Tiana, ...

Contributors
Ferrero Mendoza, Vanessa Cristina, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, Kitch, Sally, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

“French Vanilla” is a collection of written narratives drawn from lived experiences which serve as the vehicle storytelling that I use to examine larger themes related to the intersections of race and gender. Themes include: binaries, legitimacy, intersectionality, biracial identity development (border identity construction), whiteness, shame, and crisis. While the narratives are situated within theoretical discourse, the narratives present a representation of the lived experience. These pieces engage members of my family as well as a number of figures, including Rachel Dolezal, President Barack Obama, Alicia Keys, and a stranger on a tram in an airport. My relationship with these ...

Contributors
Bates, Carly Christopher, Davis, Olga Idriss, de la Garza, Sarah Amira, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

This paper explores the contested relationships between nature, culture, and gender. In order to analyze these relationships, we look specifically at outdoor recreation. Furthermore, we employ poststructuralist feminist theory in order to produce three frameworks; the first of which is titled Mother Nature’s Promiscuous Past. Rooted in Old World and colonial values, this framework illustrates the flawed feminization of nature by masculinity, and its subsequent extortion of anything related to femininity — including women and nature itself. This belief barred women from nature, resulting in a lack of access for women to outdoor recreation. Our second framework, titled The Pleasurable ...

Contributors
Polick-Kirkpatrick, Kaelyn, Downing, Haley Marie, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Horizon is a young adult dystopian fiction piece that addresses issues of gender and LGBTQIA+ identity. In the story, the world has been divided into two separate societies: earth, inhabited by females, and a platform in the sky, inhabited by males. This physical division is the result of a war between the two groups. Ever since this war, there has been limited communication between the two societies, and the members of each society have animosity for those who are of a different sex or gender. The plot follows two main characters, Andrea and Susumu, as they come to understand the ...

Contributors
Perry, Samantha Lynn, Himberg, Julia, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

This project is a feminist exploration of the muse as a cultural icon, and of the relationship dynamic between artists and their muses, using specific twentieth century photographers and their models as examples. The pairs discussed are Lee Miller and Man Ray, Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, and Charis Wilson and Edward Weston.

Contributors
Fanguy, Rachel Marie, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, Fahlman, Betsy, et al.
Created Date
2015-05