Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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2013 2017

Perceptions of the self differ between cultures, generally between those cultures in the West and East. Some of the ways that these individuals from these cultures may differ are in their self-construal, their collectivist and individualist tendencies, and how they perceive control in their lives. The current study proposes that some of these differences are influenced by different concepts individuals hold regarding the “soul”, or inner self. These concepts may be promoted by the different religious beliefs prominent in different regions. The Soul Perception Index, being developed through this study, measures belief in multiple souls, a universal soul, a single ...

Contributors
Naidu, Esha Svetha, Cohen, Adam, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Investment and interest in mental health on a global scale is increasing. This interest creates a need to gain an in depth understanding about how mental illness is conceptualized and treated in different cultures. This article aims to explore the views of maternal mental health in Kenya’s sub-counties. Maternal mental health has a significant impact on child development outcomes, so the topic has cross-generational importance. Ten focus group discussions with a variety of participants were conducted to understand the health care system. The participants were from four Kenya sub-counties: Rachuonyo N., Wagwe, Okiki Amayo, Nyative and they were either members ...

Contributors
Augur, Haley Rose, Nelson, Elizabeth, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Today’s society increasingly sexualizes women (Kilbourne, 2003). Women are constantly confronted with an image of beauty through various forms of media. Body acceptance programs on college campuses have found that women often report feeling pressure to dress in a sexualized manner, cover up their so-called flaws with make-up, and continually strive to be thin. Currently, no measure exists to assess the daily behaviors of women to wear make-up or dress in certain ways due to body image concerns. Thus, the goal of the current studies was to develop a brief self-report questionnaire on make-up and sexualized clothing for college women. ...

Contributors
Smith, Haylie Jean, Perez, Marisol, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Marijuana is currently the mostly widely used illicit drug in the U.S., and has been for multiple decades (Johnston et. al., 2016). Despite a growing belief that marijuana use is not harmful, over 4 million Americans have met criteria for marijuana use disorders in the past year alone (CBHSQ, 2015). According to marijuana trajectory studies, about a third of marijuana users will end up quitting later in life, but some – such as those who meet criteria for dependence – have a much greater difficultly quitting. Therefore, by looking at marijuana users who were successful in quitting, and comparing them ...

Contributors
Gomez, Kira Elise, Pardini, Dustin, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Current research has consistently shown that children substantially younger than 2 years of age understand object permanence; i.e. infants have realistic expectations of where hidden objects should reappear, and they react with increased looking time to experimenter-manipulated violations of object permanence. However, new research has revealed that 2-year-olds’ understanding of object permanence does not seem to transfer to active search tasks. Although infants look longer when an object moves behind a screen and is subsequently shown to have “magically” passed through a solid barrier, 2-year-olds do not search correctly for an object that has moved behind a panel of four ...

Contributors
Harkins, James Montgomery, Fabricius, William, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

How do children understand how others see the world? I examined correlations between 4-8 year old children’s understanding of beliefs and their understanding of other ways that people represent the world. Beliefs that I measured are understanding of pretense, understanding that things can have multiple identities, understanding that people can know things by inference, and understanding that people can look at the same thing and have different representations of it. I predicted that there would be correlations among these tasks. In particular, I predicted children would be able to understand these tasks when they understood true and false beliefs, based ...

Contributors
Laitin, Emily Lynne, Fabricius, William, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

This research examined the influence that Christian and Hindu religious beliefs have on environmentalism; specifically, whether beliefs that one would return to this earth after death (i.e., a belief in reincarnation) and how the world might end may explain more positive attitudes toward the environment. Participants were 533 self-identified Christians and Hindus in the United States and India who completed an online survey assessing religiosity, positive attitudes towards environmentalism, afterlife beliefs, and eschatological beliefs. Christians showed significantly lower ratings of environmentalism compared with Hindus. There were also significant negative differences found based on beliefs about heaven, eschatology beliefs, and increased ...

Contributors
Parde, Madeline Morgan, Cohen, Adam, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Human perceptual dimensions of sound are not necessarily simple representations of the actual physical dimensions that make up sensory input. In particular, research on the perception of interactions between acoustic frequency and intensity has shown that people exhibit a bias to expect the perception of pitch and loudness to change together. Researchers have proposed that this perceptual bias occurs because sound sources tend to follow a natural regularity of a correlation between changes in intensity and frequency of sound. They postulate that the auditory system has adapted to expect this naturally occurring relationship to facilitate auditory scene analysis, the tracking ...

Contributors
Wilkinson, Zachary David, McBeath, Michael, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Affluent children have been previously understudied and considerably neglected in developmental research due to the notion that they are “low risk.” There is limited empirical research exploring the effects of parent involvement in affluent youth: specifically, the importance of the adolescent’s perception that their mother/father do not spend as much time with them as they would like. The goals of the study were to explore the role of this dimension of perceived parental involvement in anxious-depressed symptoms, somatic symptoms, rule breaking behaviors and substance use with upper-class suburban youth. The sample was taken from the New England Study of Suburban ...

Contributors
Ojeda, Johanna Alyssa Quiambao, Luthar, Suniya, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a prevalent problem that can have a devastating impact across the lifespan on the mental and physical health, interpersonal relationships, and myriad other aspects of the lives of those who experience it. Therefore, it is essential for psychologists and other mental health practitioners who treat survivors of CSA to understand both the nature and the far-reaching consequences of adverse childhood sexual events on survivors. Although prior research has shown that CSA can have a significant effect on the sexual interest and functioning of adolescents and young adults, there is a dearth of research studies examining ...

Contributors
Block, Kayla Nicole, Infurna, Frank, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.