Skip to main content

Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Date Range
2012 2018


Creative adventurers are a modern artistic subculture defined by aesthetic individualism and rugged outdoor practicality. Contemporary photographers and videographers who live an active outdoor lifestyle place significant demands on their shoes and feet wherever they work. As a result of the increasing growth of photo based social media, part of producing creative content in this field involves artists interacting directly with their favorite brands through “product tagging” and other means of rapid networking. This energetic atmosphere of creativity and brand engagement presents a unique opportunity to introduce a footwear product specifically made for the brand-conscious visual artist. A collaborative shoe ...

Contributors
Hansen, Chase Arthur, Hoffner, Kristin, Eaton, John, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Over the last decade, the ability to track daily activity through step counting devices has undergone major changes. Advanced technologies have brought about new step counting devices and new form factors. The validity of these new devices is not fully known. The purpose of this study was to validate and compare the step counting accuracy of commercially available hip- and wrist-worn accelerometers. A total of 185 participants (18-64 years of age) were analyzed for this study, with the sample composed nearly evenly of each gender (53.5% female) and BMI classification (33% overweight, 31.9% obese). Each participant wore five devices including ...

Contributors
Kramer, Cody Lee, Buman, Matthew, Hoffner, Kristin, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a bike ride distancing the whole West Coast (1,657 miles). The purpose of the study was to determine the motives for the cyclists’ participation and to then classify those motives as intrinsic or extrinsic. A scale used to measure motivation of marathoners was transcribed to match those of the cycling participants to assess motivation. The participants were divided into 4 groups ...

Contributors
Reyes, Naomi Gabrielle, Hoffner, Kristin, Broman, Tannah, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on self-efficacy (SE) in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Thirty-nine participants were randomly divided into a voluntary cycling group (VC) (i.e., self-selected cadence), an assisted cycling group (ACT) (i.e., at least 30% faster than self-selected cadence accomplished by a motor), or a no exercise group (NC). In each cycling intervention the participant completed 30 minute cycling sessions, three times per week for a total of eight weeks. Two subsets of the Physical Activity and Self Efficacy Survey were administered prior to cycling (i.e., pretest) and after the eight week intervention ...

Contributors
Wallace, Kellie Carter, Ringenbach, Shannon, Youngstedt, Shawn, et al.
Created Date
2015-12

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an intervention involving physical practice combined with motor imagery and physical practice alone on swimming performance for fifty-yard freestyle. Forty-five male and female high school swimmers were participants on two different high school teams. One team was the treatment group, which included the participants partaking in both motor imagery and physical practice. The other team served as the age matched control group, and the swimmers participated in physical practice only. The combined practice group performed motor imagery three times per week and physical practice five times per week. The ...

Contributors
Sears, Mychaela Leduc, Hoffner, Kristin, Broman, Tannah, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Introduction/Purpose: This paper describes the process of the community needs assessment phase of program implementation for the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) clinic. Homeless individuals are more likely (than non homeless individuals) to experience serious illness, depression and mental illness. Access to health care has been identified as a barrier to receiving appropriate health care to manage the diseases and conditions clients may have. SHOW’s vision is to operate on Saturdays utilizing Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) to offer extended primary health care hours, along with offering health promotion programming to address the biopsychosocial components of their health. ...

Contributors
Shqalsi, Eneida Agustin, Hoffner, Kristin, Harrell, Susan, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

This guide book was written for Arizona State University students, and focuses on teaching the importance of balanced, holistic, and preventative approaches to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The main purpose of formulating this guide was to help students achieve a realistic balance between academics, health, and various responsibilities beyond school. The project itself consists of a complete manuscript of the author’s guide book, entitled Be Well: A Briefish Guide to Thriving at ASU, framed within a book proposal. There are five main chapters, including information and tips for various aspects of physical and emotional health. Included at the end of ...

Contributors
Vega, Grace-Marie, DeLusé, Stephanie, Hoffner, Kristin, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Mental toughness is frequently cited as a key psychological component for superior athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in mental toughness exist between female soccer players at different levels of collegiate competition: intramural, club, and varsity. Based on the available literature, a progressive relationship between mental toughness and level of competition was hypothesized. A total of sixty-two athletes (n=62) were recruited from the intramural, club and varsity soccer teams and administered the Sport Mental Toughness Questionnaire (SMQT). Descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variances (ANOVA) revealed no significant differences between total mental toughness or ...

Contributors
Breunlin, Lina Irene, Hoffner, Kristin, Broman, Tannah, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

The following study evaluated the effectiveness of the COR Bench, to determine if its unstable surface allows for both greater range of motion and greater tendency towards co-contraction, in comparison to a traditional flat bench. An initial session assessed the 19 participants’ (age, 22.364 ± 2.480 years; mass, 77.850 ± 18.328 kg; height, 1.787 ± 0.0923 m) current one- repetition maximum strength levels for the unilateral chest press. Four different conditions were used to test the kinematic variables such that each participant completed 5 repetitions of unilateral chest presses at 70% of their max with one and two dumbbells on ...

Contributors
Oppenheimer, Nicole, Harper, Erin, Broman, Tannah, et al.
Created Date
2013-12

The purpose of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between adaptive patterns of causal attributions, adherence, and outcome success in physical therapy behavior. Adaptive casual attributions were defined as internal, controllable, and stable attributions as per Weiner’s Attribution Theory of Motivation. Participants were seeking physical therapy for a post-surgical knee injury, with (n=3). Attributions were measured using the CDSII questionnaire, and outcome success was measured by the KOOS questionnaire to assess various dimensions of knee functionality. The respective physical therapist for the patient also completed the RAdMAT questionnaire to measure adherence. The data collected for all ...

Contributors
Dougher, Amelia Jane, Hoffner, Kristin, Broman, Tannah, et al.
Created Date
2013-05