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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Series
  • 2017-2018
Date Range
2017 2018


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For my Barrett Creative Project, I created an art installation that fostered comprehension, empathy, theorization, and healing surrounding the topic of mass gun violence in America. I used the space I was given in Gallery 100 as a graduating BFA student to host a multimedia installation designed to nurture these ideas.

Contributors
Dallman, Erica Ashley, Sale, Gregory, Hanson, Erika, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

In the era of big data, the impact of information technologies in improving organizational performance is growing as unstructured data is increasingly important to business intelligence. Daily data gives businesses opportunities to respond to changing markets. As a result, many companies invest lots of money in big data in order to obtain adverse outcomes. In particular, analysis of commercial websites may reveal relations of different parties in digital markets that pose great value to businesses. However, complex e­commercial sites present significant challenges for primary web analysts. While some resources and tutorials of web analysis are available for studying, some learners ...

Contributors
Wang, Zhen, Benjamin, Victor, Santanam, Raghu, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

This study investigated reasons for romantic dissolution in 235 participants, ranging from 18-55 years of age, who had experienced a breakup in the past 12 months. Through an online survey on Amazon Mechanical Turk, participants were asked to briefly describe their relationship, then rate how true a variety of statements were in regards to the characteristics of their relationship. Participants were then asked to rate how much each characteristic contributed as a reason for their breakup. Pairwise Pearson correlations were used to determine the variance in breakup factors with participant age. A significant positive correlation was found between age and ...

Contributors
Grassel, Savannah, Shiota, Lani, Ha, Thao, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Forty collegiate gymnasts were recruited for a nutrition and health study. Participants must have been at least eighteen years old at Arizona State University (ASU) in the club or team gymnastics program. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) reviewed and accepted my survey in order to hand out to the gymnasts. The ASU club and team coach and the ASU study team also approved my survey. As soon as the survey was approved, it was emailed to all of the gymnasts. ASU gymnasts were surveyed on nutritional knowledge and personal health. Subjects answered a quiz on nutrient needs and serving sizes. ...

Contributors
Kugler, Natalie K., Levinson, Simin, Berger, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2017-12

This ethnography outlines the live storytelling culture in Phoenix, Arizona, and what each of its sub-cultures contributes to the city’s community. Phoenix’s live storytelling events incorporate elements of an ancient art form into contemporary entertainment and sophisticated platforms for community building. These events are described and delineated by stylistic, structural, and content-based differences into the following categories: open-mic, curated, scripted, non-scripted, micro-culture, and marginalized groups. Research presented in this report was collected by reviewing scholarly materials about the social power of storytelling, attending live storytelling events across all categories, and interviewing event organizers and storytellers. My research developed toward an ...

Contributors
Norton, Maeve, Dombrowski, Rosemarie, McAdams, Charity, et al.
Created Date
2017-12

The term “Children with Special Health Care Needs,” often abbreviated as CSHCN, is an umbrella term, encompassing a wide variety of children with a range of health conditions. As of 2011, CSHCN constituted 15-20% of all children age 0-17 in the United States (Bethell et al., 2013). Despite this, CSHCN “account for 80% of all pediatric medical expenses.” (Hardy, Vivier, Rivara, & Melzer, 2012). This project specifically compares children with physical disability and behavioral disability in hopes of gaining a greater insight into both groups, assessing/comparing differences, and evaluating whether or not having a co-morbidity has a mediating or contending ...

Contributors
Devineni, Asha, McCullough, Mac, Reddy, Swapna, et al.
Created Date
2017-12

IP blacklisting is a popular technique to bolster an enterprise's security, where access to and from designated IP addresses is explicitly restricted. The fundamental idea behind blacklists is to continually add IP addresses that reputable entities, such as security researchers, have labeled as malicious to the list. Currently IP blacklisting is a reactive method, where malicious IP addresses are identified after their engagement in malicious activities is detected (e.g. hosting malware samples or sending spam emails). This thesis project aims to address this issue, by laying the groundwork for a machine learning tool that proactively identifies malicious IP address. The ...

Contributors
Alba, Iden, Shakarian, Paulo, Shakarian, Jana
Created Date
2018-05

The identity of Latinx womxn is multidimensional and widely misrepresented in media. To address this problem, I plan on presenting the multifaceted nature of this intersection by documenting micro perspectives via photography. I articulate my individual perspectives of Latinx womxnhood by using lived experiences, testimonio, through a metanarrative, painting, poetry, and mixed-media art. My micro perspective/metanarrative, as well as the testimonio/art pieces, along with the photography will speak to the macro which is surrounding and engaging us. Testimonio and art are intertwined for me and this project is a proclamation of how these two flow into one another to the ...

Contributors
Martinez, Claudia Belen, Fonseca, Vanessa, Danielson, Marivel, et al.
Created Date
2018-05