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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Date Range
2014 2018

Paleodietary analysis through the interpretation of stable isotopic analyses can be used to determine the approximate diet consumed at archaeological sites. The following question was investigated through the course of this research: What are the differences between the Middle Horizon capital of Tiwanaku and the associated colony of Chen Chen; and what do these differences, including those associated with paleodiet, suggest about interactions between the two sites? The main hypothesis suggested a similar dietary analysis between the two sites with two possible explanations. First, it is possible that similarities between the sites were due to the exchange and consumption of ...

Contributors
Douglas, Brynn Babette, Knudson, Kelly, Spielmann, Katherine, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as health, education, and social issues. While the technique may allow children to participate in research in a way that is less restrictive than other techniques, many critique the method for its adverse ethical concerns, validity, and issues of interpretation and analysis. This article reviews the ‘draw and write’ research technique and its common critiques as well as offers a case study of the ‘draw and write’ technique, performed with children ...

Contributors
Jones, Danielle Lynn, Maupin, Jonathan, Hackman, Joe, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Students not only deserve to be actively involved and engaged in learning content knowledge, but it can in fact help them learn better. Arguably too few classrooms actually utilize teaching methods that support this kind of environment. There is perhaps fear that methods like integrated curriculum may detract from student knowledge. The purpose of this intervention study was to determine how the integration of dance and social studies with an anthropological framework effects student learning of content knowledge in social studies, as well as student attitude toward the topic. Research questions that were addressed in this study are the following: ...

Contributors
Smith, Karli Elizabeth, Kulinna, Pamela, Vissicaro, Pegge, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

This ethnographic study explores the music festival phenomenon in the context of the Austin City Limits music festival, held in Austin, Texas with a total attendance of over 450,000 people annually. Using Glaser and Strauss’ grounded theory method (1967), central questions concerning structure, community identity, sustainable consumption, and waste were generated from the ethnography. These topics were analyzed with supporting theory in cultural anthropology, sociology, and sustainability. The findings are the basis for our “local-washing” theory, suggesting that localness is utilized to create a sense of authenticity. It is our shared conclusion that local-washing is a prevalent phenomenon at the ...

Contributors
Wrobel, Aleksandra, Masri, Lena, Loebenberg, Abby, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

“Bow to the Queen” is an investigation of the presence of classism within the American renaissance faire subculture and the way it impacts communication between community members. While “rennie” subculture has been the subject of many ethnographies in the past, this thesis uses quantitative data to first identify the state of classism and then analyze any effects or correlations it maintains with communication. The literature review shows that unlike past studies, “Bow to the Queen” does not compare members of the renaissance faire community to outsiders, but rather defines the complex social structure and uses it to compare different subgroups ...

Contributors
Daugherty, Hayleigh, Bates, Denise, Thomas, David, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

The Culture, Health, and Environment Lab (CHEL) at Arizona State University uses anthropological methods and field-based studies to research how cultural knowledge may be used to help understand and respond to contemporary environmental and health issues—primarily the global challenges of water insecurity and obesity. In their efforts to research water insecurity and it implications, CHEL has been working on studying water insecurity through the Global Ethnohydrology Study (GES). The Global Ethnohydrology study examines local knowledge and perceptions of water issues, using transdisciplinary methods in a multi-year and cross-country program. In the 2015-2016 study, the GES examined water, hygiene norms, and ...

Contributors
Pfeiffer, Ainsley Josephine, Wutich, Amber, Schuster, Roseanne, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Due to the nature of animals, even domesticated pets, animal scavenging of human remains is an important taphonomic factor. This area of study has, however, been undercounted in the current literature. The purpose of this study was to begin the first step in creating a taphonomic profile for urban / household animal scavenging as distinguishable from manmade tool marks. Using volunteered animals and regularly available tools, alterations were made on beef ribs in order to characterize the distinguishing profiles between the two groups. It was found that animal scavenging alterations, in the short term (20 minutes used in this study) ...

Contributors
Little, Cody Lee, Kobojek, Kimberly, Falsetti, Anthony, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Some scholars have suggested that individuals are inclined to believe that they have souls because they are also inclined to believe that they have a core, immutable self. The present study will explore this question in several parts. First, what is the extent to which individuals report having a core self? Next, how do beliefs about a core self relate to belief or non-belief in an eternal soul? The final question looks at location as an extension of the core self and soul relationship. Where is the self perceived to reside within a dualistic framework, the body or the soul? ...

Contributors
Ly, Destiny, Hruschka, Daniel, Parker, John, et al.
Created Date
2014-11-25

In my Honors Thesis, I endeavor to complicate and to respond to conventional debates over historical periodization and the problem of what it means to be “modern.” I understand the modern as a conceptual product of discourses surrounding religion, science, and industry. Specifically, the modern era has been defined as one in which the forms of rationalization associated with quantitative and experimental scientific methods and large-scale, technologically sophisticated industrial production have surpassed the “irrational” superstitions associated with religion. Critical responses to this definition have largely had the goal of supplanting it with another way of conceiving of the historical discontinuity ...

Contributors
Neibergall, William, Bennett, Gaymon, Suk, Mina, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Cultural heritage sites bring people of different backgrounds together to learn about their differences and bond over their shared human history. The tourism industry is an essential tool to access cultural heritage sites, however tourists themselves pose a threat to the delicate state of ancient ruins and heritage objects. The ways in which tourists interact with cultural heritage sites negatively impacts them, resulting in the premature destruction of cultural heritage, a non-renewable resource. These damaging behaviors may include leaving the guided path, resting on the ruins themselves, touching vulnerable parts of the ruins, and committing acts of vandalism. Tourism must ...

Contributors
Martin, Jacqueline Victoria, Graff, Sarah, Soares, Rebecca, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.