Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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2013 2017

As global population and demand for electrical power increase, humanity is faced with the growing challenge of harnessing and distributing enough energy to sustain the developing world. Currently, fossil fuels (coal/natural gas) are our main sources of electricity. However, their cost is increasing, they are nonrenewable, and they are very harmful to the environment. Thus, capacity expansion in the renewable energy sector must be realized to offset higher energy demand and reduce dependence on fossil fuels. Solar energy represents a practical solution, as installed global solar capacity has been increasing exponentially over the past 2 decades. However, even with government ...

Contributors
Bliss, Lyle Brewster, Bowden, Stuart, Karas, Joseph, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) facilitate the conversion of organic matter to electrical current to make the total energy in black water treatment neutral or positive and produce hydrogen peroxide to assist the reuse of gray water. This research focuses on wastewater treatment at the U.S. military forward operating bases (FOBs). FOBs experience significant challenges with their wastewater treatment due to their isolation and dangers in transporting waste water and fresh water to and from the bases. Even though it is theoretically favorable to produce power in a MFC while treating black water, producing H2O2 is more useful and practical because ...

Contributors
Thompson, Julia, Torres, Cesar, Popat, Sudeep, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Solar cells are an increasingly important energy source for meeting growing energy demands. Organic photovoltaics in particular have potential in this area due to their low cost and the relative abundance of their constituents. One concern with the inverted configuration (a type of OPV with increased long-term stability) is their reliance on activation by ultraviolet (UV) light. Here we examine the incorporation of a new electron transport layer (ETL) material, zinc tin oxide (ZTO), in order to assess its interaction with UV light. Current-voltage characteristics were analyzed using a 420 nm cutoff filter to control UV light exposure. ZTO proved ...

Contributors
Jackson, Skyler, Phelan, Patrick, Gust, Devans, et al.
Created Date
2014-04-02

The objective of this research study is to assess the effectiveness of a poster-based messaging campaign and engineering-based activities for middle school and high school students to encourage students to explore and to pursue chemical engineering. Additionally, presentations are incorporated into both methods to provide context and improve understanding of the presented poster material or activity. Pre-assessments and post-assessments are the quantitative method of measuring effectiveness. For the poster campaign, ASU juniors and seniors participated in the poster campaign by producing socially relevant messages about their research or aspirations to address relevant chemical engineering problems. For the engineering-based activity, high ...

Contributors
Bueno, Daniel Tolentino, Ganesh, Tirupalavanam, Parker, Hope, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Arson and intentional fires account for significant property losses and over 400 civilian deaths yearly in the United States. However, clearance rates for arson offenses remain low relative to other crimes. This issue can be attributed in part to the challenges associated with performing an arson investigation, in particular the collection and interpretation of reliable data. PLOT-cryoadsorption, a dynamic headspace sampling technique developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, was proposed as an alternate technique for extracting ignitable liquid residues for analysis. The method was generally shown to be robust, flexible, precise, and accurate for a variety of ...

Contributors
Nichols, Jessica Ellen, Forzani, Erica, Nielsen, David, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Styrene, a component of many rubber products, is currently synthesized from petroleum in a highly energy-intensive process. The Nielsen Laboratory at Arizona State has demonstrated a biochemical pathway by which E. coli can be engineered to produce styrene from the amino acid phenylalanine, which E. coli naturally synthesizes from glucose. However, styrene becomes toxic to E. coli above concentrations of 300 mg/L, severely limiting the large-scale applicability of the pathway. Thus, styrene must somehow be continuously removed from the system to facilitate higher yields and for the purposes of scale-up. The separation methods of pervaporation and solvent extraction were investigated ...

Contributors
McDaniel, Matthew Cary, Nielsen, David, Lind, Mary Laura, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Lithium-ion batteries are the predominant source of electrical energy storage for most portable electronics applications, including hybrid/electric vehicles, laptops, and cellular phones. However, these batteries pose safety concerns due to their flammability and tendency to violently ignite upon short circuiting or failing. Solid electrolytes are a current research development aimed at reducing the flammability and reactivity of lithium batteries. The compound Li7La3Zr2O12, or LLZO, exhibits satisfactory ionic conductivity in the cubic phase, which is normally synthesized via doping with Al. It has recently been discovered that synthesizing nanostructured LLZO can stabilize the cubic phase without the need for doping. Here ...

Contributors
Gordon, Zachary Daniel, Chan, Candace K., Lin, Jerry, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

One of the grand challenges of engineering is to provide access to clean water because it is predicted that by 2025 more than two thirds of the world’s population will face severe water shortages. To combat this global issue, our lab focuses on creating a novel composite membrane to recover potable water from waste. For use as the water-selective component in this membrane design Linde Type A zeolites were synthesized for optimal size without the use of a template. Current template-free synthesis of zeolite LTA produces particles that are too large for our application therefore the particle size was reduced ...

Contributors
King, Julia Ann, Lind, Mary Laura, Durgun, Pinar Cay, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also known as hydrotalcite-like materials, are extensively used as precursors for the preparation of (photo-)catalysts, electrodes, magnetic materials, sorbents, etc. The synthesis typically involves the transformation to the corresponding mixed metal oxide via calcination, resulting in atomically dispersed mixed metal oxides (MMOs). This process alters the porosity of the materials, with crucial implications for the performance in many applications. Yet, the mechanisms of pore formation and collapse are poorly understood. Combining an integrated in situ and ex situ characterization approach, here we follow the evolution of porosity changes during the thermal decomposition of LDHs integrating different ...

Contributors
Murty, Rohan Aditya, Deng, Shuguang, Nielsen, David R., et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Asymmetric polystyrene-gold composite particles are successfully synthesized alongside core-shell composite particles via a one-step Pickering emulsion polymerization method. Unlike core-shell particles which form in the droplet phase of a stabilized Pickering emulsion, asymmetric particles form via a seeded growth mechanism. These composite particles act as catalysts with higher recyclability than pure gold nanoparticles due to reduced agglomeration. With the addition of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM) monomers, temperature-responsive asymmetric and core-shell polystyrene/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-gold composite particles are also synthesized via Pickering emulsion polymerization. The asymmetric particles have a greater thermo-responsiveness than the core-shell particles due to the increased presence of NIPAAM monomers in the seeded-growth ...

Contributors
Rabiah, Noelle Ibrahim, Dai, Lenore, Torres, Cesar, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.