Skip to main content

Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Date Range
2012 2018

In Arizona, there are virtually no established support groups or services for children on the autism spectrum and their families when experiencing the loss of a loved one. This is due to many factors, including the complexity of autism, an inconsistent belief that children with autism are capable of grieving, and a general lack of research conducted on the crossover of children with autism and grief. This proposal is based on the social work strengths perspective, in which I argue that children living with autism are capable of grieving and need support to do so. The way families and practitioners ...

Contributors
Cohen, Jessica Marie, Ingram-Waters, Mary, Stuckey, Michelle, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Self-regulation in the form of coping with emotions is something that most people have effectively adapted to by adulthood. This is an organically learned process that begins in early childhood through play, parenting, education, and peer interactions. This study examines whether six children aged 4-5 (M age= 4.72, SD= 0.372, 50% female, 100% Caucasian) are able to understand basic emotions and how to cope with them through one of two protocols. The conditions were either directive instruction or embodied cognition, and children were evaluated with a pre and post-test measure. Findings did not indicate any significant effect of the conditions ...

Contributors
Littell, Naila Sabre, Frutiger, Kiana, Fey, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2017-12

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as health, education, and social issues. While the technique may allow children to participate in research in a way that is less restrictive than other techniques, many critique the method for its adverse ethical concerns, validity, and issues of interpretation and analysis. This article reviews the ‘draw and write’ research technique and its common critiques as well as offers a case study of the ‘draw and write’ technique, performed with children ...

Contributors
Jones, Danielle Lynn, Maupin, Jonathan, Hackman, Joe, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Post-traumatic stress disorder is prevalent in refugees. The population of refugees in the United States is continuing to increase, of which the majority of the incoming refugees are children. A more comprehensive approach is needed to assess children for PTSD. This creative project involved reviewing existing literature on refugees in the United States, child refugees, Erik Erikson’s stages of psychosocial development, and available and applicable PTSD assessment tools. I developed a reference chart that compared the available assessment tools. I recognized that a PTSD assessment tool for refugee children does not exist. In response, I created an approach to assessing ...

Contributors
Buizer, Danyela Sutthida, Walker, Beth, Stevens, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of word type, phonotactic probability, word frequency, and neighborhood density on the vocabularies of children with mild-to-moderate hearing loss compared to children with normal hearing. This was done by assigning values for these parameters to each test item on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (Version III, Form B) to quantify and characterize the performance of children with hearing loss relative to that of children with normal hearing. It was expected that PPVT IIIB scores would: 1) Decrease as the degree of hearing loss increased. 2) Increase as a function of ...

Contributors
Latto, Allison Renee, Pittman, Andrea, Gray, Shelley, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Neophobia is a sensory phenomenon common in children that makes novel foods taste unpleasant. Our study tested exposure and pairing effects on neophobia in children by exposing them to novel vegetables paired with varying textures. Results showed a significant increase in liking for all subject groups after six exposures, which is less exposure than required in other studies. Except in one case, texture was not related to a change in liking that differed significantly from other groups.

Contributors
Miller, Eric James, Phillips, Elizabeth Capaldi, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Equal access to community facilities and resources is vital to the educational development of children. Yet, many times community programs and activities are not appropriately adapted for children with disabilities. This thesis project explored how public library spaces and programs can be adapted to become more accessible for children with special needs. Forty-one library youth staff members were surveyed to understand their training needs and inform the development of a professional workshop. In partnership, Arizona State University and Scottsdale Public Library System created a professional development training to educate library youth staff on cultural responsivity. One component of the training, ...

Contributors
Fessenden, Wyatt J., Taylor, Michelle, Gaias, Larissa, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

The purpose of this paper was to discuss my honors thesis for Barrett, the Honors College. The content presented throughout was explanatory in nature, covering the inception of the project and its scope, as well as the potential of the project to be implemented for commercial use. The first section delved into the initialization stage of the project, and discussed the reasons I chose this subject matter for my thesis as well as the possible implications of the project’s content. The second section went into detail about the research component of the project, and provided some relevant and key facts ...

Contributors
Kellis, Cheyenne Alise, Ralston, Laurie, Skoglund, Catherine, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Research on joint control during arm movements in adults has led to the development of the Leading Joint Hypothesis (LJH), which states that the central nervous system takes advantage of interaction torque (IT) and muscle torque (MT) to produce movements with maximum efficiency in the multi-jointed limbs of the human body. A gap in knowledge exists in determining how this mature pattern of joint control develops in children. Prior research focused on the kinematics of joint control for children below the age of three; however, not much is known about interjoint coordination with respect to MT and IT in school-aged ...

Contributors
Kemmou, Nadaa, Way, Victoria, Dounskaia, Natalia, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Academic success in childhood is crucial for later academic, occupational, and life success (Heckman, 2006; Kuncel, Hezlett, & Ones, 2004; Spengler, Brunner, Damian, Lüdtke, Martin, & Roberts, 2015). Recent research suggests sleep is important for academic success but lacks objective measures of sleep (Buckhalt, El-Sheikh, Keller, & Kelly, 2009; Curcio, Ferrara, & De Gennaro, 2006; Dewald, Meijer, Oort, Kerkhof, & Bögels, 2010; Philbrook, Hinnant, Elmore-Staton, Buckhalt, & El-Sheikh, 2017). The purpose of this study was to examine the relations between sleep and academic success among children through objective measures of sleep in order to expand on the literature. Our sample ...

Contributors
Alvarez, Rachel Marie, Valiente, Carlos, Doane, Leah, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.