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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Date Range
2013 2018


Short fiction revolving around the Y2K scare, written from three perspectives. Explores the fear and uncertainty prevalent during the time and how it affected actions and relationships.

Contributors
Moore, Matthew Robert, Dalton, Kevin, Blasingame, James, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

The Paradox of Fiction can be understood as the acceptance of three plausible but inconsistent claims: Claim 1. We are genuinely moved by fiction Claim 2. We know that what is portrayed by fiction is not actual Claim 3. We are only genuinely moved by what we believe is actual. Taken individually, we intuitively accept each of the claims, however, they form a contradiction when taken together. The issue at hand is although we observe many instances of fiction moving a spectator/reader to tears, we know that the grief we observe does not reference an existent entity. How can we ...

Contributors
Goitia, Brice Edward, Bolton, Cynthia, de Marneffe, Peter, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

The common human experiences depicted in classical paintings from art history are becoming less relatable due to the increasing influence and presence of technology in our day to day lives. This project contains two parts. The first part is a remixing of 3 classical works of art so that they include the presence of technology and communicate the possible evolution of human experiences as technology will be incorporated into them. The three remixed paintings are as follows: Eduoard Manet’s Olympia, which showcases the human experience of relationships and gender dynamics; Edgar Degas’ Dancers, which showcases the human experience of creation ...

Contributors
Francois, Nathan Peter, Finn, Edward, Meissinger, Ellen, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Abstract “Empty Horizons”: A Creative Writing Piece Max Harmon “Empty Horizons” is a creative writing piece composed of two different short stories sharing a common narrator. The first story “Can you dig it?” details a trip the narrator takes to South Dakota to go hunting shortly before starting college. On the trip the narrator contemplates certain aspects of his life and the events of the story serve as a vehicle to explore the narrator’s mindset as an eighteen year old about to start a new phase in his life. The second story “Toads, Sharks and Beautiful Encounters with Uncertainty” takes ...

Contributors
Harmon, Max Doyle, Soares, Rebecca, Popova, Laura, et al.
Created Date
2014-12

As a writer and reader of young adult (YA) literature, I find it is impossible to ignore the rise of traditional masculinity within new, adolescent heroines. In the 21st century, readers have seen the rise of supposedly strong female characters—heroines who carry assault rifles and avoid their emotions. By relinquishing their emotions and their flaws, these heroines have sacrificed the qualities about themselves that initially made them appear so interesting. My desire to see more realistic heroines like myself developed into a creative fiction project that follows and acknowledges the voices of feminine heroines. I call these protagonists “female strong.” ...

Contributors
Goldsmith, Ilyssa Sallie, Gruber, Diane, Amparano, Julie, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Journalism, by its very nature, is limited, often adhering to a repetitive format and narration style. Consequently, the depth of journalistic stories will always hit a barrier. Fiction, on the other hand, provides an elegant solution by exploring the world through a myriad point of views including complete omniscience. This thesis explores the link between journalism and fiction by taking real-world scenarios and exploring them without journalism's limitations. It includes three novellas totaling 25,000 words drawn from true-to-life research papers, news stories and manifestos to paint a realistic picture of a technological reality in the near future, a style of ...

Contributors
Pacini, Jason Daniel, Zachary, Gregg, Russell, Dennis, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

The novella Flicker by Rachel Ponstein is a climate fiction story. It draws influence from the post-apocalyptic and dystopian genres as well as classic gothic literature. The story utilizes elements of gothic literature including Freud’s Uncanny, uneven framing, and bildungsroman. It also utilizes subhuman species to incite conversation about the importance of perspective and the use of an alternative lens on the post-Reckoning world. The disaster story is ambiguous to focus the reader on the importance of the characters and their progress throughout the journey rather than the overall plotline. The analysis below serves as an explanation for the intentional ...

Contributors
Ponstein, Rachel Kay, Fette, Donald, Hoyt, Heather, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Horizon is a young adult dystopian fiction piece that addresses issues of gender and LGBTQIA+ identity. In the story, the world has been divided into two separate societies: earth, inhabited by females, and a platform in the sky, inhabited by males. This physical division is the result of a war between the two groups. Ever since this war, there has been limited communication between the two societies, and the members of each society have animosity for those who are of a different sex or gender. The plot follows two main characters, Andrea and Susumu, as they come to understand the ...

Contributors
Perry, Samantha Lynn, Himberg, Julia, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

The study of literature, which has traditionally been the work of the humanities, has seemingly opened up to biology in recent years through an infusion of cognitive science and evolutionary psychology. This essay examines two perspectives on the potential for reader/character identification, one perspective from cognitive/evolutionary studies, and the other from the humanities. Building on both perspectives, I propose my own notion of reader/character identification called immersive identification. I argue that fiction is especially suited to prompt readers to identify with fictional characters in an immersive way. Then, I demonstrate how different cognitive/evolutionary perspectives of fiction can accommodate my notion ...

Contributors
Dhein, Kelle James, Eder, James, Kobes, Bernard, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

A collection of short stories within the spectrum of New American Gothic or supernatural realism.

Contributors
Saul, Tonissa Christine, Dombrowski, Rosemarie, Lichty, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2017-05