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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Date Range
2012 2018


In this project dubbed “Arizona Homeless Solutions,” the reporter attempted to take a solutions journalism approach to covering family homelessness in Arizona with an emphasis on one program, Save the Family. As a state, Arizona has been remarkably successful in reducing the number of homeless families in the state. According to the 2016 State of Homelessness in America Report, the state reduced its number of homeless family households by 22 percent, the sixth largest reduction nationally. This success is due in large part to the effective collaboration of a variety of organizations. But one program in particular, Save the Family, ...

Contributors
Clark, Charles Taylor, Gilger, Kristin, West, Maureen, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Resilience is defined as an individual’s ability to cope or “bounce back” after experiencing stressful life events (Rew et al., 2001). Survivors of trauma who express high levels of resilience are more likely to experience positive future life outcomes than equally troubled peers with lower resilience scores. It is possible to increase resilience by targeting several core factors: (1) personal competence, (2) sense of belonging, (3) sense of optimism (Lee et al., 2009). I developed an eight-week creative writing curriculum to boost these three core factors in the hopes of both increasing resilience in homeless youth while also introducing creating ...

Contributors
Popeski, Cara, Popova, Laura, Cavanaugh Toft, Carolyn, et al.
Created Date
2017-04-05

This thesis examines Care Not Cash, a welfare reform measure that replaced traditional cash General Assistance program payments for homeless persons in San Francisco with in-kind social services. Unlike most welfare reform measures, proponents framed Care Not Cash as a progressive policy, aimed at expanding social services and government care for this vulnerable population. Drawing on primary and secondary documents, as well as interviews with homelessness policy experts, this thesis examines the historical and political success of Care Not Cash, and explores the potential need for implementation of a similar program in Phoenix, Arizona.

Contributors
McCutcheon, Zachary Ryan, Lucio, Joanna, Williams, David, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Introduction/Purpose: This paper describes the process of the community needs assessment phase of program implementation for the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) clinic. Homeless individuals are more likely (than non homeless individuals) to experience serious illness, depression and mental illness. Access to health care has been identified as a barrier to receiving appropriate health care to manage the diseases and conditions clients may have. SHOW’s vision is to operate on Saturdays utilizing Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) to offer extended primary health care hours, along with offering health promotion programming to address the biopsychosocial components of their health. ...

Contributors
Shqalsi, Eneida Agustin, Hoffner, Kristin, Harrell, Susan, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (2017), Homelessness affects 2.5 million children annually (n.p). Children who are exposed to homelessness many times also suffer from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) which can hinder a younger person’s development cognitively, socially, and can cause health problems such as heart disease later on in life. Examples of an ACE are death of a family member, witnessing or experiencing violence, economic hardship, or having a parent with a alcohol or drug addiction. About 70,000 of children in Arizona suffer from five or more ACEs. In this project music therapy interventions such as songwriting, ...

Contributors
Pino, Melanie, Summar, Annie, Vergnetti, Courtney, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Homelessness is one of the most visible and tragic problems facing Phoenix today. As Tucson cut its homelessness count nearly in half over the past six years, Phoenix only saw a reduction of 25%. The question remains: what is the best solution for Phoenix to reduce and eventually eliminate homelessness? This paper examined costs and benefits as well as examples in other cities and states of Housing First solutions’ effectiveness at reducing the number of people suffering from homelessness. It was found that Housing First solutions, namely Permanent Supportive Housing and Rapid Re-Housing, would be highly effective in combating the ...

Contributors
Ghali, Zakary Hawkes, Lewis, Paul, Kilman, Margaret, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Homelessness is a pervasive in American society. The causes of homelessness are complex, but health and homelessness are inextricably linked. Student-run free clinics care for underserved populations, including people experiencing homelessness, but they have multiple agendas—to provide care but also to give students hands-on experience. It is plausible that these two agendas may compete and give patients sub-par quality of care. This study examines patient care in the SHOW free clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, which serves adults experiencing homelessness. This study asks two questions: First, do clinicians in Phoenix’s SHOW free clinic discuss with patients how to pay for and ...

Contributors
Wilson, Ethan Sinead, Jehn, Megan, Harrell, Susan, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

This project aimed to compile a comprehensive directory of faith congregations in the city of Tempe that would be willing to participate in the Interfaith Homeless Emergency Lodging Program (I-HELP). I-HELP is a non-profit sector of the Tempe Community Action Agency (TCAA) that successfully houses Tempe’s homeless population by the generous participation of faith congregations. 5 participants out of the 75 contacted completed the survey. These congregations were found on Google Maps and were contacted through the means of telephone, email, and personal introductions.

Contributors
Lam, Christina, Valiente, Carlos, Brougham, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

The United States is arguably the most powerful country in the world boasting the largest GDP and yet there are over half a million homeless Americans as of November 2015. While traditional solutions to combat homelessness adequately assist the majority of people experiencing homelessness as a short-term issue, traditional solutions do not serve the complex needs of the chronically homeless. One creative solution being applied across the nation to end chronic homelessness is Housing First. This report assesses the feasibility of a Housing First program in Tucson Arizona to reduce unsheltered rates. It discusses the current state of homelessness across ...

Contributors
Zamora, Emilia Faye, Samuelson, Melissa, Lamoreaux, Phillip, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

This paper describes Social Determinants of Health and the implementation of a screener. Social Determinants are structural drivers in an individual’s life that affect their status of health. A screener’s potential effectiveness at a student-run interdisciplinary clinic was also explored in the paper through the analysis of Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW). SHOW’s framework allows for a unique implementation of the screener because of the vulnerable population it serves, and the flexibility of the organization’s structure. Its interdisciplinary nature allows for the SDOH screener to be integrated into its process more easily, especially with the presence of disciplines such ...

Contributors
Thomas, Christy Maria, Reddy, Swapna, Essary, Alison, et al.
Created Date
2018-05