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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Date Range
2013 2017


In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1 million are children (ALA, 2014). An important factor in trying to curb the frequency of asthma attacks is education. Particular elements of asthma education include symptom recognition, self-management skills, correct administration, and understanding how medications are used to control asthma. A review of the literature shows that multimedia education holds some promise in increasing asthma-knowledge retention. This creative project involved the creation of an asthma-education video with a concomitant asthma-education ...

Contributors
Vanhkham, Sophia, Wells, Amanda, Stevens, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

The public education system in the United States is one of the nation’s most powerful and influential institutions. Although this system was and continues to be viewed as a societal equalizer, the institution of public education was never constructed to support equity. This paper examines educational inequity by analyzing American history state standards in Arizona, California, New Mexico, Montana, and Oklahoma. American history state standards are carefully curated to construct a dominant “American story.” For this project three frameworks were utilized to analyze the five state standards: Timeframe of Inclusion, Life Domains, and Population Characterization. These three frameworks helped unpack ...

Contributors
Bartlett, Maria Juanita, Lomawaima, K. Tsianina, Nethero, Brian, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

The aim of this study is to analyze the impact Arizona legislation has had on STEM education access, specifically for Latino students. Using socio-ecological systems theory, this study explores the relation between the macro and exo-systemic context of education legislation and the micro-systemic context of being a STEM undergraduate at a state university. In order to understand how STEM education is affected, legislation was analyzed through the Arizona Legislative Database. Additionally, current STEM undergraduates were interviewed in order to discover the factors that made them successful in their majors. Data from the interviews would demonstrate the influence of the Arizona ...

Contributors
Hernandez-Gonzalez, Rosalia, Herrera, Richard, Casanova, Saskias, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

This study examined associations between Latino parents' cultural orientation and their behaviors in support of their 9th grade adolescents in science (n= 104). Parents reported their orientation to mainstream U.S. and Latino culture, traditional cultural values, and immigration status. Adolescents reported how often their parents engaged with them in science related behaviors, such as general positive support in science, school involvement, teaching them things about science, discussing the future, and engaging in science-related co-activity. Results indicate that adolescent boys whose parents lack U.S. documentation are in greatest need of parent support in science.

Contributors
Gastelum, Alexandra Nicole, Simpkins, Sandra, Updegraff, Kimberly, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

This paper introduces the causes and effects of domestic violence in a general sense, and further focuses on the specific consequences experienced by Latinos of traditional culture in regards to partner abuse. While it is unclear why rates of intimate partner violence are higher for Latinas, their cultural values associated with gender roles and spiritual beliefs are complicating factors that are further magnified by socioeconomic challenges many Latinas experience. This paper examines the interplay between Latino cultural values and intimate partner violence, and highlights the relevance of this knowledge to inform effective social work practice in the Latino community.

Contributors
Bennett, Brittney Kay, Bonifas, Robin, Parsai, Monica, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth and can be seen with an increase incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. This increase in obesity can be attributed to physical inactivity. Increases in social support and self-efficacy are independently related to increases in physical activity. A lifestyle intervention can lead to increases in social support, self-efficacy and physical activity. Objective/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine whether a 12-week lifestyle intervention could increase social support, self-efficacy and physical activity in obese Latino adolescents that participated in the intervention. It was hypothesized that adolescents that participated in ...

Contributors
Rahman, Hanna, Shaibi, Gabriel, Hoffner, Kristin, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth. This increase in obesity is seen with an increased incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. Objective/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a community based lifestyle intervention, which encompassed nutrition education and physical activity, on diabetes risk in pre-diabetic Latino adolescents. Diabetes risk was assessed using pancreatic beta cell function as measured by proinsulin: insulin ratio. It was hypothesized that reductions in added sugar intake and reductions in saturated fat intake will be associated with improved beta cell function as measured by proinsulin: insulin ratio. ...

Contributors
Kaur, Manroop, Shaibi, Gabriel, Bruening, Meredith, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Diabetes is prevalent among the Latino population in the United States. Engagement in healthy dietary behaviors, especially as a young adult, is an effective means of reducing risk for diabetes. Previous psychological theories have demonstrated that health beliefs and perceived barriers influence engagement in such behaviors. This research investigated beliefs regarding risk for diabetes among the young, educated Latino population. Study 1 of this research sought to compare health beliefs and perceived barriers to barrier change in the young, educated Latino and European American populations. Latinos reported to have a higher perceived vulnerability to diabetes, but shared the belief in ...

Contributors
Towers, Michelle, Kwan, Virginia S. Y., Aiken, Leona S., et al.
Created Date
2014-05

The purpose of this study was to provide a foundation for a plan for evaluations of the impact of the Learning Center on elementary school children with respect to academic achievement and school-related behaviors. Exploratory pre- and posttest data were collected and analyzed and recommendations were provided for a broader evaluation plan to be used in the future. The experience from the exploratory evaluation, limitations and the recommendations in this study can be used by Chicanos Por La Causa to strengthen the Learning Center and thereby optimize the benefit to the children served within the San Marina residential community.

Contributors
Lodhi, Osman Sultan, Roosa, Mark, Dumka, Larry, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent form of cancer in both genders and second highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the availability of preventative CRC screening, Latinos as a group are of particular concern for CRC as they tend to have a lower screening rate, contributing to the possibility of late-stage diagnosis or even death. However, little is known about the perceptions of CRC screening and factors which contribute to beliefs about CRC in Latinos. Most studies are quantitative and rarely include a qualitative approach focusing on cultural aspects and communication with physicians. The ...

Contributors
Magdaleno, Claire Rose, Kim, Sunny, McNulty, Julie, et al.
Created Date
2015-12