Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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Date Range
2013 2017

The demographics of Arizona are changing as Hispanics children are passing through their youth and into adulthood. Yet, even with this changing population Arizona has demonstrated an unwillingness to provide adequate educational opportunities for Hispanic school children. The state has perpetuated fear throughout the Hispanic community in an attempt to marginalize and stigmatize the race. Such attempts have extended to youth in schools creating an environment of fear. This fear limits the academic potential of young Hispanics who are wary of government officials and institutions. Arizona has also failed to provide appropriate funding for programs used predominantly by Hispanic students ...

Contributors
Smith, Jason Ryan, Davis, T. J., Ovando, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2013-12

Latino/Hispanic students in public high schools are demonstratively underrepresented in music programs throughout the United States. The following literature review synthesizes research that attempts to identify the most significant determinants of participation and explores how such factors can affect students of Latino/Hispanic descent. The study applies an anti-racist perspective to the discussion of determinants by discussing the specific presence of Latino/Hispanic community in the United States and the various ways in which the music education system may fail to represent the ethnic group in the curriculum. The review also studies research that has found ways to better represent and recruit ...

Contributors
Estrada, Patricia, Hudson, James G, Miller, Keith, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Changes in Latino neighborhoods in Tucson, Arizona that occurred between 1990 and 2010 were studied. The overall Latino population increased substantially within the larger metropolitan area during the target time period. Neighborhoods were selected that had changed to become predominantly Latino during the target time period based on maps measuring ethnic clusters. Research was designed to characterize Latino neighborhoods in Tucson in terms of transformation. Methodology for comparison between changed and unchanged neighborhoods was developed. Observations were made in the three new neighborhoods, as well as in three historically Latino neighborhoods that experienced little change during the same time period. ...

Contributors
Leavitt, Isabella Maish, Lara-Valencia, Francisco, Velez-Ibanez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

This thesis project investigated the linguistic competence of four brothers in an attempt to evaluate the effects that assimilation in the United States has on language loss within second generation speakers. The project employed the use of a case study and autoethnography in order to take a closer look at the concepts of assimilation, acculturation, and language loss, as well to provide a real world example of their interrelatedness. The second generation, or the heritage speakers in the family, were the focus of the study in order to provide a closer look at how the heritage language was retained within ...

Contributors
Dreher, Brian Francis, Ovando, Carlos, Martin, Thomas, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Background: Latinos represent 40.8% of the population in Phoenix (U.S. Census Bureau Population Division, 2010). South Phoenix, also known as the South Mountain Village, defined in geographical terms as area zip codes 85040 and 85042; is a predominantly Latino community comprised of mixed citizenship status households. During the 2010 United States Census 60.3% of the population in South Phoenix identified as Latino, 25.75% of the total population was foreign born. Of the foreign born population, 88.95% were of Latin American origin (United States Census Bureau, 2007-2011 American Community Survey). Understanding how Latino immigrants perceive differences in health between their communities ...

Contributors
Gray, Laurel, Wutich, Amber, Quiroga, S. Seline, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Diabetes is prevalent among the Latino population in the United States. Engagement in healthy dietary behaviors, especially as a young adult, is an effective means of reducing risk for diabetes. Previous psychological theories have demonstrated that health beliefs and perceived barriers influence engagement in such behaviors. This research investigated beliefs regarding risk for diabetes among the young, educated Latino population. Study 1 of this research sought to compare health beliefs and perceived barriers to barrier change in the young, educated Latino and European American populations. Latinos reported to have a higher perceived vulnerability to diabetes, but shared the belief in ...

Contributors
Towers, Michelle, Kwan, Virginia S. Y., Aiken, Leona S., et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Wilson and Kelling’s (1982) broken windows theory (BWT) says that disorder causes crime at the neighborhood level. More specifically, this theory posits that perceptions of disorder increase fear of crime, which then reduces community involvement, making crime more likely. Recent studies show that race plays a pivotal role in people’s perceptions of disorder. In short, people tend to associate race with low socioeconomic status, high arrest rates, and lack of policing. Therefore, race plays a central role in the BWT framework as it is linked to perceptions of disorder and crime. However, ethnicity is less well understood when analyzing the ...

Contributors
Esparza, Karla N, Wallace, Danielle, Ready, Justin, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent form of cancer in both genders and second highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the availability of preventative CRC screening, Latinos as a group are of particular concern for CRC as they tend to have a lower screening rate, contributing to the possibility of late-stage diagnosis or even death. However, little is known about the perceptions of CRC screening and factors which contribute to beliefs about CRC in Latinos. Most studies are quantitative and rarely include a qualitative approach focusing on cultural aspects and communication with physicians. The ...

Contributors
Magdaleno, Claire Rose, Kim, Sunny, McNulty, Julie, et al.
Created Date
2015-12

The aim of this study is to analyze the impact Arizona legislation has had on STEM education access, specifically for Latino students. Using socio-ecological systems theory, this study explores the relation between the macro and exo-systemic context of education legislation and the micro-systemic context of being a STEM undergraduate at a state university. In order to understand how STEM education is affected, legislation was analyzed through the Arizona Legislative Database. Additionally, current STEM undergraduates were interviewed in order to discover the factors that made them successful in their majors. Data from the interviews would demonstrate the influence of the Arizona ...

Contributors
Hernandez-Gonzalez, Rosalia, Herrera, Richard, Casanova, Saskias, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

This study examined associations between Latino parents' cultural orientation and their behaviors in support of their 9th grade adolescents in science (n= 104). Parents reported their orientation to mainstream U.S. and Latino culture, traditional cultural values, and immigration status. Adolescents reported how often their parents engaged with them in science related behaviors, such as general positive support in science, school involvement, teaching them things about science, discussing the future, and engaging in science-related co-activity. Results indicate that adolescent boys whose parents lack U.S. documentation are in greatest need of parent support in science.

Contributors
Gastelum, Alexandra Nicole, Simpkins, Sandra, Updegraff, Kimberly, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.