Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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2012 2017

This project examines the literary figures of Tristan and Isolde, looking to see how each character is portrayed, how their portrayals change through time, and takes a socio-cultural perspective in attempts to explain why these portrayals were used, and why they changed. Three different versions of the Tristan and Isolde story from three different time periods were used: Le Morte Darthur by Sir Thomas Malory from the 1400’s, Idylls of The King by Lord Alfred Tennyson from the 1800’s, and the film Tristan + Isolde distributed by 20th Century Fox in the mid 2000’s. For each version of the story, ...

Contributors
Kupsch, Mary Francis, Newhauser, Richard, Haggins, Bambi, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Critical thinking has driven pedagogical development and captured the attention of educators for years and is now an important focus in classrooms today (Fahim, 2014, p. 141). Common core and STEM education are both impressive additions to the educational process and practice and exist to encourage students to ask questions, analyze information, and create their own solutions or ideas. During my time studying education at Arizona State University, I noticed that a majority of references to critical thinking were in conjunction to STEM subjects. In this study, I explore and defend the benefit of using classical literature to promote critical ...

Contributors
Sherry, Alyssa Lyn, Smudde, Christopher, Esch, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2016-12
Contributors
McNay, Michael, Dreyfoos, Dale, Harper, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2012-12

This project focuses on techniques contemporary American poets use in their work. Ten different poetry collections are analyzed for dominant writing styles and techniques, which I then apply to my own poems, concentrating on modeling that particular poet. I then reflect on those poems through an evaluation of my writing process, how those techniques were implemented, and how they affected the poem. In addition to these reviews and reflections, I also wrote three articles about the literary community and what I’ve learned from my interactions in that community. All these materials are organized into a website, which shows the connections ...

Contributors
Hansen, Elizabeth Sarah, Murphy, Patricia, Savard, Jeannine, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Medical Humanities is a growing field and much scholarship focuses on the promotion of empathy in professionals. I argue incorporation of literature is crucial as it develops critical thinking skills that guard against the dangers of collective thought. A Foucauldian analysis of three literary works, my own creative non-fiction short story, William Carlos Williams' “The Use of Force,” and Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s Cancer Ward offer the student perspective, the doctor perspective and the institutional perspective, respectively, and subversive undertones offer an example of the analytical thought developed in humanities education by challenging assumptions and elucidating implicit power relations in the medical ...

Contributors
Block, Courtney Samantha, Lussier, Mark, Fox, Cora, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Faërie exists in the mythology and literature of northwestern Europe as a spiritual Otherworld, a land of immortal beauty just tangential to our own. This project explored multiple conceptions of Faërie and their common association with things that have been lost. The pattern that emerged is one in which the Otherworld is not merely linked to lost things, but becomes a way of preserving and rediscovering them. Faërie embodies the hope that things lost live on, and can be found again.

Contributors
Bell, Andrew Roos, Baldini, Cajsa, Maring, Heather, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

Though people are beginning to analyze the internet as an active social force, a seemingly insurmountable problem permeates all criticisms of the world wide web: how do we begin to frame the Internet as a subject of inquiry when its role in our lives is constantly shifting, continually slipping from definition, yet undeniably reconstructing a new human condition? I believe an answer may lie in placing the Internet within the context of the Faust Myth – a legend that has repeatedly been used to explore humanity’s obsession with power. For my undergraduate honors thesis, I wrote and performed an adaptation ...

Contributors
Munger, Adrielle Karen, Sturges, Robert, Sterling, Pamela, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

The Hunger Games is one of the best representations of trauma and PTSD within a fictional work. While none of the characters are specifically diagnosed with PTSD, all of those who undergo the games put in place by the Capitol experience various forms of trauma and find various methods of coping. We see characters such as Haymitch or the morphling victors turn to drugs and alcohol for their survival. Further, we see characters such as Wiress and Annie who have incoherent speech and who struggle to put their thoughts into words. Finally, there are characters such as Peeta and Katniss ...

Contributors
Wadhwa, Lipika, Hunter, Joel, Matoka, Kimberly, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

The following is a fantasy twist on the Christian Bible, set before the time of Adam of Eve. The plot follows the lives of the first humans before Adam and Eve, the Father's first attempt at creating humanity. Additionally, it follows the first generation of archangels on an adventure into the abyss. The work draws on theological, and mythological ideas including Greek mythology, Hasidic legend, John Milton's Paradise Lost, and even Dungeons and Dragons.

Contributors
White, Zachary Christopher, Sturges, Robert, Corse, Taylor, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

In my thesis paper, I examine the gothic elements found in classical gothic fairy tales from European and Japanese tradition, particularly those works by the Brothers Grimm and Yei Theodora Ozaki. By examining the principle gothic elements that are unique to both stories, and further analyzing the commonalities of story, plot, and other major tropes, a better understanding of the message meant to be imparted and other cultural nuances can be ascertained. Gothic literature creates an atmosphere of gloom and suspense, toying with concepts of dread and darkness by employing Gothic elements such as shadows, the supernatural, sinister buildings, and ...

Contributors
Moschonas, Jerasimos Theodore, Ellis, Lawrence, Hoyt, Heather, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.