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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Date Range
2013 2018


Synesthesia is a psychological phenomenon in which the stimulation of one sensory modality brings about a response from at least one other modality. There has now been about two centuries of official synesthesia research, yet the current era of study, about the 2000s on, has proven invaluable to our further understanding of how synesthesia works in our perceptive world. I myself have two forms of synesthesia: color-grapheme and lexical-gustatory. In this paper, I look back on my personal experience with synesthesia and review its history and its operational definitions and theories. I then aim to perform a small case study ...

Contributors
Gronewold, Sara Suzanne, Liss, Julie, Infurna, Frank, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Tempo control is a crucial part of musicianship that can provide an obstacle for novice musicians. The current study examines why novice percussionists increase their playing tempo when they increase their loudness (in music, loudness is referred to as dynamics). This study tested five hypotheses: 1) As actual tempo changes, listeners perceive that the tempo is changing; 2) There is a perceptual bias to perceive increases in acoustic intensity as also increasing in tempo; 3) All individuals, regardless of percussion experience, display the bias described in hypothesis 2; 4) Unskilled or non-percussionists increase or decrease produced tempo as they respectively ...

Contributors
Johnson, Adam Gregory, McBeath, Michael, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

In recent years, the number of applications for admission to graduate education programs has increased. Researchers attempted to gain insight into this increase by examining student perception of the costs and benefits of pursuing graduate-level education. In order to gauge this perception, researchers administered an online survey to 151 subjects from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University. Student perception was then compared to data released by ASU detailing actual costs and benefits of obtaining graduate-level education. Researchers’ prediction that increased levels of parental education would be associated with more accurate estimates of the benefits of graduate-level education was ...

Contributors
Cunningham, Shelly Kathryn, DeSerpa, Allan, Baldwin, Marjorie, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

The transition from high school to college is, for many, a drastic change in lifestyle, social networks, and dietary choices. The prevalence of obesity in college students has been steadily increasing. Freshmen weight gains have been associated with a decrease in fruits and vegetables and an increase in unhealthy items such as desserts, alcohol, and late night snacking after dinner. A survey of college students was constructed to gauge students’ perceptions of nutrition how these perceptions influenced dietary practices and behaviors. Survey results indicated that awareness of nutrition and health does not translate to dietary practices, aligning with results from ...

Contributors
Keahon, Gabriela Estrada, Jehn, Megan, Williams, Deborah, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Human perceptual dimensions of sound are not necessarily simple representations of the actual physical dimensions that make up sensory input. In particular, research on the perception of interactions between acoustic frequency and intensity has shown that people exhibit a bias to expect the perception of pitch and loudness to change together. Researchers have proposed that this perceptual bias occurs because sound sources tend to follow a natural regularity of a correlation between changes in intensity and frequency of sound. They postulate that the auditory system has adapted to expect this naturally occurring relationship to facilitate auditory scene analysis, the tracking ...

Contributors
Wilkinson, Zachary David, McBeath, Michael, Glenberg, Arthur, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Highly publicized cases involving citizen fatalities due to police use of force raise questions about perceptions of danger. Arrest-related deaths due to weapons, accidental injuries, and natural causes remain high year after year. Communities are greatly affected, and mistrust with the police continues to increase when these situations happen. There seem to be inaccurate perceptions that may stem from implicit associations, stereotypes, and social learning. These psychological concepts may provide theoretical explanations of how decisions are made when police officers are faced with danger. Some elements of this decision-making process may include suspect characteristics, officer experience, and police sub-culture. In ...

Contributors
Garcia-Johnson, Anastacia Maria, Szeli, Eva, Pizarro, Jesenia, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Contextual cues can impact how statements are perceived. Specifically, they may be perceived as more aggressive than they otherwise would be. For the study, both medium of communication (in-person versus online) as well as how competitive the context was (non-competitive or competitive) were examined, with a bit of focus on gender. 130 Arizona State University students enrolled in Psychology 101 were surveyed; the mean age was 19.32 (SD = 1.43). A 2x2 factorial design was used, consisting of four possible conditions: In-person/Competitive, Online/Competitive, In-person/Non-Competitive, and Online/Non-Competitive. Participants read two scenarios, each featuring a target character who says an ambiguous statement, ...

Contributors
Robins, Alexander Eric, Shiota, Michelle, Neuberg, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Behavior traits were examined in an observed experiment with the presentation of an American Pit Bull Terrier. The experiment was conducted at two locations (Wal Mart, Pet Smart) with searching for behavior traits (positive, negative) with an American Pit Bull Terrier present. In contrast to the hypothesis, there was more positive behavior traits than negative behavior traits. Together, these findings suggest that the presentation of an American Pit Bull Terrier has a more positive outlook on the breed rather than negative. Similar studies should be conducted to change the legislation in regard of “Pit Bulls” that cause discrimination against the ...

Contributors
Mendoza, Beatriz Karinme, Cooke, Nancy, Meloy, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Popular Culture of today, particularly books and movies have begun to influence the way individ- uals and society as a whole, views specific concepts. In this case, the fairly recent phenomenon of the Sci- ence Fiction Drug Niche has produced significant thought among audiences as to both the benefits and costs of cognitive enhancers in our world. Through the use of both a thorough analysis of modern films and novels on the topic as well as focus groups of the average college students this study analyzes the influence that this niche has had on the perceptions that students have towards ...

Contributors
Syed, Mariha Batool, Zachary, Gregg, Hurlbut, Ben, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Abstract The current study examined how people perceive three different types of relationships: Sugar Baby/Sugar Daddy (SB/SD) relationships, same-sex relationships, and heterosexual relationships. In an online survey, undergraduate students rated these different types of couplings on overall general view, acceptability and approval. Additionally, survey participants were asked to complete measures of religiosity and socio-sexual orientation to investigate whether these individual measures moderated ratings. Overall, SB/SD relationships were rated the most negatively, least acceptable, and least approved of out of the three relationship types. Following SB/SD relationships are same-sex relationships and then lastly heterosexual relationships. Higher religiosity scores led to lower ...

Contributors
Graham, Victoria Lee, Saenz, Delia, Randall, Ashley K., et al.
Created Date
2016-05