Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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2013 2016

It is well established that physical activity (PA) directly correlates with many health benefits, especially when active habits are formed during childhood and adolescence. PA practiced in adolescence has been seen to carry into adulthood, helping to combat a host of chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. However, in recent years there has been a steady decline in PA among adolescents, followed by a resulting rise in sedentary behavior. Walking Intervention Through Texting for Adolescents, or WalkIT-A, was an 11.5-week intervention that built upon behavioral theory to provide an incentive-based, adaptive, physical activity intervention to inactive adolescents. The goal ...

Contributors
Van Bussum, Courtney Jessica, Adams, Marc, Forzani, Erica, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Background: Physical inactivity is a major cause of obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes and has become a major public health problem. Physical inactivity is detrimental to one’s health, but it has also created a significant healthcare burden. Within the past decade, many health-based interventions have been implemented to encourage physically inactive individuals to adopt a more active lifestyle. These health-based interventions have used social media websites, particularly Facebook, to establish social support between the participants of those interventions. There is currently limited research on this topic. This study aims to add to that literature by exploring strategies to encourage ...

Contributors
Nasef, Amr Sherif, Crespo, Noe, Hekler, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

The aim of this study is to understand the relationship among physical fitness, leisure-time activity levels, measures of body composition, and assessments of emotion toward physical activity in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). This is important because it could help individuals understand the importance of physical activity in this population. The BMI, waist circumference, height, weight, body fat percentage, and non-exercise estimation of aerobic capacity along with the temporary state of emotion toward physical activity of thirty participants with DS were measured. The results of our study show that individuals with DS who are more physically fit have less body ...

Contributors
Snow, Michelle Jeannette, Ringenbach, Shannon, Chen, Chih-Chia, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

This study examined the relationships between the amount of physical activity engagement and two sets of health-related tests: measures of physical fitness (abdominal curl-ups, push-ups, handgrip strength, hip flexibility, and cardiorespiratory fitness) as well as measures of motor skill performance (kicking, throwing, jumping, hopping, running, and standing from a supine position) in mid-life women (ages 45-65). Physical activity engagement was assessed using 7-day accelerometer readings and the Stanford Brief Activity Survey. Motor skill performance was assessed using scores of maximum kicking, throwing, jumping, hopping, and running speeds and maximum jumping distance. Physical fitness was assessed using scores of maximum abdominal ...

Contributors
House, Hannah Elizabeth, Ainsworth, Barbara, Der Ananian, Cheryl, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

With an excessive amount of resources in the United States healthcare system being spent on the treatment of diseases that are largely preventable through lifestyle change, the need for successful physical activity interventions is apparent. Unfortunately an individual’s physical activity and health goals are often not supported by the social context of their daily lives. This single-case design study, Walking Intervention through Text messaging for CoHabiting individuals (WalkIT CoHab), looks at the efficacy of a text based adaptive physical activity intervention to promote walking over a three month period and the effects of social support in intervention performance in three ...

Contributors
Fernandez, Jacqueline Alyssa, Adams, Marc, Angadi, Siddhartha, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

With obesity and metabolic diseases reaching epidemic levels, it is important to find ways to increase physical activity and improve diet. Previous studies have shown that improvements in mood can increase desire to perform physical activity, and that vitamin C intake is linked to improvements in mood. Based on this, two hypotheses were formed and tested to investigate the effect on physical activity levels and mood states from vitamin C supplementation at a dose of one gram per day in the form of a novel functional food. Thirty-one college students or faculty at Arizona State University were screened from a ...

Contributors
Helland, Stephanie Lynn, Johnston, Carol, Sweazea, Karen, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Physical activity patterns among youth has become an issue throughout the world in recent decades. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have established daily physical activity guidelines for youth; however, not all children follow these recommendations. Factors leading to this include limited opportunities for active transportation and after-school activity programs. In this study, 3rd through 9th grade students from a rural community were evaluated based on their transportation method to and from school, participation in after-school sports programs, and overall how active they were in a 24-hour period based on step count. Students completed questionnaires regarding their transportation and ...

Contributors
Swiss, Amanda, Kulinna, Pamela Hodges, Hoffner, Kristin, et al.
Created Date
2013-12

Exercise is a great boon to both the health of individuals and the national as a whole. Exercise provides a wide range of significant and well established benefits to both physical and psychological health, with many benefits that are still being discovered. The effects of exercise on health are somewhat unique, as exercise is one of a limited number of ways to improve health that is not harm a reduction strategy, but instead increases health through direct benefit, rather than increasing health by decreasing damage and harm. Support is also given to the proposal that individuals are in best position ...

Contributors
Rael, Ashur Scott, Kashiwagi, Dean, Kashiwagi, Jacob, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Previous research has found improvements in motor and cognitive measures following Assisted Cycle Therapy (AC) in adolescence with Down syndrome (DS). Our study investigated whether we would find improvements in older adults with DS on measures of leisure physical activity (GLTEQ) and sleep, which are early indicators of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in persons with Down syndrome. This study consisted of eight participants with Down syndrome between 31 and 51 years old that cycled for 30 minutes 3 x/week for eight weeks either at their voluntary cycling rate (VC) or approximately 35% faster with the help of a mechanical motor (AC). ...

Contributors
Parker, Lucas Maury, Ringenbach, Shannon, Buman, Matthew, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Introduction/Purpose: the purpose of this study was to explore the perception of care after stillbirth and the use of physical activity and/or mindful approaches (e.g., yoga) to cope with grief in women of racial/ethnic minority who have experienced stillbirth. Methods: This was an exploratory qualitative research study. Participants were African American, Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian women, between the ages of 26 and 38, who have experienced stillbirth within the past 3 years. Participants completed a 20-30 minute phone interview. Results: Fourteen women participated in the study (M age = 31.02 ± 5.97 years; M time since stillbirth = 1.47 ...

Contributors
Arvayo, Jordan Michelle, Huberty, Jennifer, Hoffner, Kristin, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.