Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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2013 2017

We were interested in whether or not certain demographics, such as gender, age, education level, and academic major, would affect an individual’s political awareness. In particular, we hypothesized that Political Science majors would have a higher level of political awareness than Non-Political Science majors. In an in-person survey, we asked participants on the Arizona State University, Tempe campus a series of nine questions measuring government structure and procedure, current politics, and policy issues. Our findings concluded that, within our sample: 1) on average, Political Science majors outperformed Non-Political Science majors 2) education level appears to be positively associated with political ...

Contributors
Taylor, Kaela, Leung, Emily, Lennon, Tara, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

There exists a strong correlation between successful democratic governance and citizen participation. Pulling this sense of civic engagement to the furthest end of the spectrum, author and political theorist Benjamin Barber expresses the benefits of citizen independence and self-governance though political deliberation in a variety of texts, one of which being Strong Democracy. While the United States currently operates on a “democratic” base, the overall lack of political efficacy undermines democratic effectiveness. Benjamin Barber outlines a series of solutions and employment strategies in order to increase efficacy and bolster civic engagement and bring about a culture of self-legislation, but in ...

Contributors
Salute, Nicholas John, Kirkpatrick, Jennet, Halavais, Alex, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

This research looks at the state of Anglo-American political relations since 1980. By examining the political partnerships between Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher, Margaret Thatcher and George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Tony Blair, Barack Obama and Gordon Brown, and Barack Obama and David Cameron, it explores if the so called ‘special relationship’ remains so special today in a world of growing political animosity and challenges. The thesis argues that the success of the ‘special relationship’ between the United States and United Kingdom has not been just due to similar political ideologies or goals, but also personal friendships which ...

Contributors
Gavin, Stephen Christopher, Critchlow, Donald, Stermetz, Catherine, et al.
Created Date
2015-12

ABSTRACT The First Ladies: Exploring Achievement and Public Perception Overview The First Lady has become a fixation of the American people and the press. This thesis examines how specifically this interest in the President’s wife has evolved over time. Additionally, it explores a variety of factors that could possibly influence public perception – era, cultural norms, and advances in technology. Research Questions Does the era of the tenure of the First Lady affect public perception and press coverage of her? Do the cultural norms and values of the time of the First Lady’s tenure affect public perception and press coverage ...

Contributors
Franko, Anna, Edson, Belle, Quinlivan, Raena, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

An analysis of recent historical trends demonstrates that, while a large part of the twentieth century was dominated by a secular movement away from faith-based governance and societal norms, there exists now in the twenty-first century a developing global movement on the part of a burgeoning, international religious community to again find and clarify a place for faith in the public square. While much of the current international conversation revolves around the more radical elements of this movement, there is a more dominant mainstream, rational desire that is currently being overlooked and ignored, as modern, secular nation-states now grapple to ...

Contributors
Yentzer, Zachary Thomas, Batalden, Stephen, Kader, David, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

It seems that we are incessantly scolded about the importance of the American political process and its virtue of practicality in contemporary society. Whether through the accumulation of the so-called facts about the issues that inform the veneration of the contest between candidates, the stern and noble duty of becoming an activist performing dreary tasks, or the religious fervor surrounding the sacred obligation of voting, we are assured and reassured that our system is sound and that we must only confront problems of implementation rather than structural ones. From here, the narrative goes that if we subscribe to the doctrine ...

Contributors
Goldsmith, Adam Jay, Ramsey, Ramsey Eric, Gruber, Diane, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

This thesis examines how the wording of proposed government policies can affect the level of public support that a given policy generates. By surveying 158 Phoenix residents, I tested the differing degrees of support that voters would have for a proposed city ordinance, which would stop Homeowners’ Associations from restricting the use of native desert plants in residential landscaping. The ordinance was framed in the survey as a self-governance issue or a water conservation issue. I found that the message frames had little effect on the overall level of support for the ordinance, since most residents had moderate support for ...

Contributors
Smith, Mary Hannah, Darnall, Nicole, Ramirez, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

The aim of this study is to analyze the impact Arizona legislation has had on STEM education access, specifically for Latino students. Using socio-ecological systems theory, this study explores the relation between the macro and exo-systemic context of education legislation and the micro-systemic context of being a STEM undergraduate at a state university. In order to understand how STEM education is affected, legislation was analyzed through the Arizona Legislative Database. Additionally, current STEM undergraduates were interviewed in order to discover the factors that made them successful in their majors. Data from the interviews would demonstrate the influence of the Arizona ...

Contributors
Hernandez-Gonzalez, Rosalia, Herrera, Richard, Casanova, Saskias, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

Very little of modern America resembles the country that existed during the time of the Nation’s founding. The country has technologically, socially, and economically advanced to the point of likely being unrecognizable to our Founding Fathers. However the American Voting system is strikingly similar to the system established over two centuries prior. The current system of First-Past-The-Post voting has numerous structural biases and inadequacies that contribute to the current level of American dissatisfaction. The system discourages compromise, prevents the formation of third parties, is vulnerable to manipulated, and contributes to the toxic American political environment. Adopting a replacement for the ...

Contributors
Burke, Andrew Sutherland, Kashiwagi, Dean, Kashiwagi, Jacob, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

Popular culture has a longstanding tendency for being affected by, and reversely affecting, politics. Films, in particular, can exist as either purse “escapism” or heady pathways for political commentary. During the Second World War, governments in both the United States and Great Britain used film as a vessel for their own messages, but after the war ended, the two nations allowed their respective film industries more free expression in commenting on wartime and post-war politics. Film also provided particularly vivid political commentary during, and in the years immediately following, the Cold War. Though film has a longstanding history of being ...

Contributors
Nelson, Taylor Lynn, Miller, April, O'Flaherty, Katherine, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.