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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.


Date Range
2012 2018


This essay explores the role of religion, science, and the secular in contemporary society by showing their connection to social and political legitimacy as a result of historical processes. In Chapter One, the essay presents historical arguments, particularly linguistic, which confirm science and religion as historically created categories without timeless or essential differences. Additionally, the current institutional separation of science and religion was politically motivated by the changing power structures following the Protestant Reformation. In Chapter Two, the essay employs the concept of the modern social imaginary to show how our modern concept of the political and the secular subtly ...

Contributors
Bianchi, Joseph Anthony, Bennett, Gaymon, Wetmore, Jameson, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a bike ride distancing the whole West Coast (1,657 miles). The purpose of the study was to determine the motives for the cyclists’ participation and to then classify those motives as intrinsic or extrinsic. A scale used to measure motivation of marathoners was transcribed to match those of the cycling participants to assess motivation. The participants were divided into 4 groups ...

Contributors
Reyes, Naomi Gabrielle, Hoffner, Kristin, Broman, Tannah, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

College and university students are heavily influenced by their exposure to opportunities, individuals, and belief-systems during their time in school. More specifically, countless students are impacted by campus Christian ministries. There are 67 registered religious clubs and organizations across Arizona State University's four campuses, and 46 of them identify as Christian. Similar to most faith-based organizations, Christian campus ministries seek to impact the lives of students. This study will take a look at the influence of these ministries at ASU by researching their intersection with another key component of university life: wellness. The primary research question is, “How does involvement ...

Contributors
Souza, Ann Christina, Golden, Amy, Valiente, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

This thesis reflects on how we understand the psyche, religion, and care for the Earth and the suffering Other. Through a hermeneutic walk through the works of Martin Heidegger, John D. Caputo, and Friedrich Nietzsche, we come to have an understanding of the incredible importance of words, language, and stories. Technological language is taken as a threat to what makes humans unique, if it makes us say that what matters most must be able to be measured. The myth of Cupid and Psyche leads us to an understanding that the psyche is made of words, and that stories are true, ...

Contributors
Seitz, Sarah Elizabeth, Ramsey, Ramsey Eric, Watrous, Lisa, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

This paper examines creative process and performance as a method of research for understanding self-in-context through the lens of my own artistic research for “Dress in Something Plain and Dark,” a project exploring my relationship as a woman to Mennonite religious and cultural identity, spirituality, and dance. Situating my artistic work in relationship to the fields of creative autoethnography, queer and transborder performance art, and somatic dance practice, I discuss the distinctions and commonalities of approach, methods, and practice of artists working in these fields, and the shared challenges of marginalization, translation, and contextualization. In response to these challenges, and ...

Contributors
Yoder, Allyson Joy, de la Garza, Sarah Amira, Ellsworth, Angela, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Trust was measured for a target profile that varied the target’s religion and costly signaling behavior. Subjects were primed with a threat, romance, or neutral response previous to viewing the profile to determine if this had any effect on their trust ratings of the target. Participants were drawn from MTurk with ages ranging from 18 to 75 (M= 33.2) and various religious backgrounds (including 210 Christians, 190 atheists/agnostics, and 92 other religious believers). Participants were presented with the threat, romance, or neutral vignette, shown the target profile, and asked to rate the target’s trustworthiness. There was no main effect of ...

Contributors
Besaw, Courtney Michelle, Cohen, Adam, Brewer, Gene, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

In response to a national call within STEM to increase diversity within the sciences, there has been a growth in science education research aimed at increasing participation of underrepresented groups in science, such as women and ethnic/racial minorities. However, an underexplored underrepresented group in science are religious students. Though 82% of the United States population is religiously affiliated, only 52% of scientists are religious (Pew, 2009). Even further, only 32% of biologists are religious, with 25% identifying as Christian (Pew, 2009; Ecklund, 2007). One reason as to why Christian individuals are underrepresented in biology is because faculty may express biases ...

Contributors
Truong, Jasmine Maylee, Brownell, Sara, Gaughan, Monica, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

Transhumanist concepts and themes increasingly occupy a prominent place in contemporary visions of the future, particularly with regard to technology. A growing number of scholars, including some self-described transhumanists, see transhumanism as functioning like a religion for secular people, in that it fulfills many of the same desires and impulses without reference to any supernatural forces. For this reason there is a growing discussion of transhumanism in comparison with major religious traditions, but one which has heretofore been underappreciated is Protestant pietism. Pietism grew out of a need among Protestants after the Reformation to realize a better Christian community and ...

Contributors
Depew, Mason James, Tirosh-Samuelson, Hava, Bennett, Gaymon, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

The term I’jaz al Qur’an refers to the inimitable quality of the Qur’an. The doctrine of inimitability comes directly from the Qur’anic text itself: And if you are in doubt about what We have sent down upon Our Servant [Muhammad], then produce a surah the like thereof and call upon your witnesses other than Allah, if you should be truthful (The Qur’an Al-Baqarah 2:23). This verse is one of the verses of tahaddi (challenge) that challenges mankind to imitate just one chapter of the Qur’an. The doctrine of inimitability comes directly from this verse and four others throughout the Qur’an. ...

Contributors
Shakoor, Musa Abdul, Ali, Souad, Gallab, Abdullahi, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

In the current study, the author investigated whether sociosexual orientation interacted with an experimental manipulation of sex ratios previously used by Li et al. (2010) which showed that men and women report greater religiosity after viewing profiles of attractive members of their own sex. The author predicted that only people of restricted sociosexual orientation would be reporting greater religiosity after viewing profiles of attractive members of their own sex. A sample of 171 undergraduate students (85 men, Mage = 19.5) from a large Southwestern university participated in the study for course credit. Participants were first administered the Sociosexual Orientation Index ...

Contributors
Cottengaim, Isaiah John, Cohen, Adam, Neuberg, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2014-05