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Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection


Date Range
2012 2018
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I founded the ASU Shakespeare Club and then directed a production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" set in a contemporary mental institute. This thesis includes the revised script, a journal of the rehearsal process, an introductory essay, and production photos.

Contributors
Gallagher, Nicole Marie, Fox, Cora, Giner, Oscar, et al.
Created Date
2014-05
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Technical innovation has always played a part in live theatre, whether in the form of mechanical pieces like lifts and trapdoors to the more recent integration of digital media. The advances of the art form encourage the development of technology, and at the same time, technological development enables the advancement of theatrical expression. As mechanics, lighting, sound, and visual media have made their way into the spotlight, advances in theatrical robotics continue to push for their inclusion in the director’s toolbox. However, much of the technology available is gated by high prices and unintuitive interfaces, designed for large troupes and ...

Contributors
Hollenbeck, Matthew D., Wiebel, Griffin, Winnemann, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

A student-run theatre company would give students more opportunities to perform. as well as opportunities to direct, design, and produce something that is not usually available to us. The main goal of the topic is to create a student-run theatre company that would be able to support three to four minimal, low budget productions each year that are directed, designed, and performed by the students. These productions could be works that are new or out of the mainstream, one-act operas or musicals, works written or composed by our own students, or even standard repertoire. Productions could be minimal, with the ...

Contributors
Zheng, Shuwen, Reber, William, Dreyfoos, Dale, et al.
Created Date
2015-06-18

BLOCKBUSTED is a one-act play about Clyde, a 12-year-old boy who has a pretty wild imagination. After losing in a very competitive sand castle building competition, Clyde is determined to prove to his father that he is in fact not a failure. When Clyde’s father becomes sick with a very uncommon disease, Clyde must find a way to get the money required for his father’s surgery. A mysterious being offers Clyde the chance to get the money, but Clyde must go on a journey and bring back a secret treasure. Clyde ends up traveling to the last remaining Blockbuster Video ...

Contributors
Newman, Bradley Andrew, Sterling, Pamela, Ganssle, Gene, et al.
Created Date
2015-12

This thesis explores the dialogue between William Shakespeare, Central and Eastern Europe during the Soviet experiment, and the power of performance as protest. Politically inflected plays that are transnational appropriations of Shakespeare were aimed to subvert state-sanctioned censorship in order to enforce public socio-political interrogations of the Communist Party. My research first established a foundation for the site-specific historical and political context from which the interpretations stem, before examining the texts themselves as pieces of cultural resistance. I focused on four appropriations of Shakespeare’s plays, one being a rewrite of Richard III and three being rewrites of Hamlet: Nedyalko Yordanov’s ...

Contributors
Ellison, Amber Nicole, Orlich, Ileana, Goggin, Maureen, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

This thesis explores the various reasons that Broadway musicals fail, or “flop”. It goes into detail on several musicals of different genres, and explains what their shortcomings were, whether it be a less-than-perfect book, a weak score, or a production team that was not experienced in the skills that it takes to put together a musical. It discusses how long the shows ran for, or if they ever made it into a Broadway house. It looks at what the audience reception was like for each show, and whether the shows were a success with the tough critics of Broadway. In ...

Contributors
Urias-Ramonett, Sedona Lee, Yatso, Toby, Dreyfoos, Dale, et al.
Created Date
2018-05

The process of playwriting is much more than merely writing the script itself; it is a process of outlining, writing, rewriting, and rewriting some more. This project explores that process from the very beginning to the late stages of final rewrites on a full-length, two-act stage play, Forget Me Not. Thematically, the play addresses issues such as legacy, ambition, the limitations of memory, and the complex relationships between women. It also speaks to the possibility of hope and revolves around twenty-something characters who are not nihilistic or pretentious as in the frequently-dominant portrayal of that demographic, but rather witty, intelligent, ...

Contributors
Prahl, Amanda Catherine, Sterling, Pamela, Campbell, Corey, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

We endeavored to begin the process of writing a musical. We composed a total of three songs, 30 pages of script (non-consecutive) with an outline summarizing the remaining uncompleted pages, seven character summaries/analyses, and a reflection on the process and next steps, and presented them in a “Producer Pitch” format to our readers. In our paper we discuss the birth of inspiration for Girls And Boys—namely philosophical conflicts about the role of biology vs. society in gender identity and real, local events of public districts reevaluating their sex education program—as well as the challenges we experienced during the process and ...

Contributors
Doering, Emilie, Moylan, Megan, Yatso, Toby, et al.
Created Date
2015-05

Female social stereotypes paralyze female actors when approaching roles in theatre. This thesis discusses some of the social stereotypes I have encountered in theatre and how I have chosen to orient myself through those stereotypes. Combined with a 45 minute performance, I took iconic female roles that embody stereotypes such as, the girl-next-door, the mother, the ugly girl, the naïve virgin, and the tomboy, and tried to approach them through the given circumstances and not the stereotypes. The result ended in a powerful, vulnerable presentation that ignited the human truths under each stereotype. In order to create insightful, empowering female ...

Contributors
Sawyer, Sarah Elyse, Yatso, Toby, Eckard, Bonnie, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Abstract As humans, we can instill a different mindset when it comes to our bodies and suffering. Using Antonin Artuad’s contributions to the theater in examining the role and consequences of dehumanization, disability can be reimagined. There is a need for a "true theater" of "cruelty," not in the literal sense, but in a metaphorical sense whereby the essence of being alive is revealed through the exaggerated gestures of the true theater, or "poetry in space." Disability is the embodiment of chaos, in the way it manifests the human condition through the reality of having a body, and as the ...

Contributors
Cramer, Sarah Della, Oliverio Lauderdale, Annamaria, Stuckey, Michelle
Created Date
2018-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.