Barrett, The Honors College Thesis/Creative Project Collection

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2013 2017

In this paper, I will look at recent game studies in three (3) large categories: (1) how games can be used for educational instruction, (2) how games impact players’ social skills and behavioral choices, and (3) how games function as a method for satisfying human needs of play and entertainment. Within each category, several studies will be summarized. I have chosen these three (3) categories in particular because they are the ones I am most interested in and will afford to me the background research with which to define my own path of research and game design.

Contributors
Somers, Michael John, Devine, Theresa, McNamara, Danielle, et al.
Created Date
2016-12

This honors thesis project combines the research of regional marketing trends in international film posters and game packaging designs with a creative application of that research. The thesis consists of 4 main sections. The first section includes background research on film poster marketing design approaches and summary of international guidelines for game packaging standards. The second part contains an analysis of selected global film posters from all genres leading up to Disney/Pixar movies, and also a few popular video game packaging designs. The research is then be applied to 3 designs based on regional trends in the largest hubs of ...

Contributors
Adivikolanu, Harika Sruthi, Dove-Viebahn, Aviva, Viles, Rebecca, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Computer simulations are gaining recognition as educational tools, but in general there is still a line dividing a simulation from a game. Yet as many recent and successful video games heavily involve simulations (SimCity comes to mind), there is not only the growing question of whether games can be used for educational purposes, but also of how a game might qualify as educational. Endemic: The Agent is a project that tries to bridge the gap between educational simulations and educational games. This paper outlines the creation of the project and the characteristics that make it an educational tool, a simulation, ...

Contributors
Fish, Derek Austin, Karr, Timothy, Marcus, Andrew, et al.
Created Date
2013-05

With the increasing popularity of video games and the emergence of game streaming brought about by platforms such as Youtube and Twitch, combined with the multitude of ways to learn how to code from schools and online resources including Codecademy and Treehouse, game development has become incredibly approachable. Yet that does not mean it is simple. Developing a game requires a substantial amount of work, even before a design is considered worth making into a complete game. Over the course of this thesis, I created eight designs with accompanying prototypes. Only one was made into a fully functional release. I ...

Contributors
Charnell, Zachary Andrew, Olson, Loren, Amresh, Ashish, et al.
Created Date
2015-12

Speech recognition in games is rarely seen. This work presents a project, a 2D computer game named "The Emblems" which utilizes speech recognition as input. The game itself is a two person strategy game whose goal is to defeat the opposing player's army. This report focuses on the speech-recognition aspect of the project. The players interact on a turn-by-turn basis by speaking commands into the computer's microphone. When the computer recognizes a command, it will respond accordingly by having the player's unit perform an action on screen.

Contributors
Nguyen, Jordan Ngoc, Kobayashi, Yoshihiro, Maciejewski, Ross, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

The project, "The Emblems: OpenGL" is a 2D strategy game that incorporates Speech Recognition for control and OpenGL for computer graphics. Players control their own army by voice commands and try to eliminate the opponent's army. This report focuses on the 2D art and visual aspects of the project. There are different sprites for the player's army units and icons within the game. The game also has a grid for easy unit placement.

Contributors
Hsia, Allen, Kobayashi, Yoshihiro, Maciejewski, Ross, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

The objective of this creative project was to gain experience in digital modeling, animation, coding, shader development and implementation, model integration techniques, and application of gaming principles and design through developing a professional educational game. The team collaborated with Glendale Community College (GCC) to produce an interactive product intended to supplement educational instructions regarding nutrition. The educational game developed, “Nutribots” features the player acting as a nutrition based nanobot sent to the small intestine to help the body. Throughout the game the player will be asked nutrition based questions to test their knowledge of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. If the ...

Contributors
Nolz, Daisy, Martin, Austin, Quinio, Santiago, et al.
Created Date
2017-05

The 2010s have seen video games rise to prominence as platforms for game developers, entertainers and advertisers to broadcast their ideas. This paper looks at the major steps in gaming history that led to games as a global mass communication tool, the way the Internet has created an industry built around broadcasting games and the potential future ramifications competitive gaming, emerging technology and intellectual property law hold on the world of video games.

Contributors
Chesler, Jayson Daniel, Hill, Retha, Amresh, Ashish, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

The action/adventure game Grad School: HGH is the final, extended version of a BME Prototyping class project in which the goal was to produce a zombie-themed game that teaches biomedical engineering concepts. The gameplay provides fast paced, exciting, and mildly addicting rooms that the player must battle and survive through, followed by an engineering puzzle that must be solved in order to advance to the next room. The objective of this project was to introduce the core concepts of BME to prospective students, rather than attempt to teach an entire BME curriculum. Based on user testing at various phases in ...

Contributors
Nitescu, George, Medawar, Alexandre, Spano, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2014-05

Storytelling is innately human, and research has shown it has the powerful ability to “transport” people into a narrative. Literature on the topic of immersion discusses how technology form perceptual illusions to make a user feel detached from reality and create an impactful escapist experience. By examining and synthesizing relevant literature, key methods of storytelling used in theme parks, museums, and virtual environments that are used to deepen immersive experiences were identified. A model of the demonstrated techniques and methods for facilitating immersion through storytelling in these varying contexts has been created to suggest that these methods can be applied ...

Contributors
Walker, Natalie Simone, Roscoe, Rod, Meier, Matt, et al.
Created Date
2016-05

Barrett, the Honors College accepts high performing, academically engaged students and works with them in collaboration with all of the other academic units at Arizona State University. All Barrett students complete a thesis or creative project, supervised and defended in front of a faculty committee. The thesis or creative project allows students to explore an intellectual interest and produce an original piece of scholarly research. The thesis or creative project is a student’s opportunity to explore areas of academic interest with greater intensity than is possible in a single course. It is also an opportunity to engage with professors, nationally recognized in their fields and specifically interested and committed to working with honors students. This work provides tangible evidence of a student’s research, writing and creative skills to graduate schools and/or prospective employers.