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2013 2017

Large-N comparative studies have helped common pool resource scholars gain general insights into the factors that influence collective action and governance outcomes. However, these studies are often limited by missing data, and suffer from the methodological limitation that important information is lost when we reduce textual information to quantitative data. This study was motivated by nine case studies that appeared to be inconsistent with the expectation that the presence of Ostrom’s Design Principles increases the likelihood of successful common pool resource governance. These cases highlight the limitations of coding and analysing Large-N case studies. We examine two issues: 1) the ...

Contributors
Barnett, Allain, Baggio, Jacopo, Shin, Hoon Cheol, et al.
Created Date
2016-09-09

Institutions, the rules of the game that shape repeated human interactions, clearly play a critical role in helping groups avoid the inefficient use of shared resources such as fisheries, freshwater, and the assimilative capacity of the environment. Institutions, however, are intimately intertwined with the human, social, and biophysical context within which they operate. Scholars typically are careful to take this context into account when studying institutions and Ostrom’s Institutional Design Principles are a case in point. Scholars have tested whether Ostrom’s Design Principles, which specify broad relationships between institutional arrangements and context, actually support successful governance of shared resources. This ...

Contributors
Anderies, John, Janssen, Marco, Schlager, Edella, et al.
Created Date
2016-09-23

Climate change and its interactions with complex socioeconomic dynamics dictate the need for decision makers to move from incremental adaptation toward transformation as societies try to cope with unprecedented and uncertain change. Developing pathways toward transformation is especially difficult in regions with multiple contested resource uses and rights, with diverse decision makers and rules, and where high uncertainty is generated by differences in stakeholders’ values, understanding of climate change, and ways of adapting. Such a region is the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, from which we provide insights for developing a process to address these constraints. We present criteria for sequencing actions ...

Contributors
Abel, Nick, Wise, Russell M., Colloff, Matthew J., et al.
Created Date
2016

Social roles are thought to play an important role in determining the capacity for collective action in a community regarding the use of shared resources. Here we report on the results of a study using a behavioral experimental approach regarding the relationship between social roles and the performance of social-ecological systems. The computer-based irrigation experiment that was the basis of this study mimics the decisions faced by farmers in small-scale irrigation systems. In each of 20 rounds, which are analogous to growing seasons, participants face a two-stage commons dilemma. First they must decide how much to invest in the public ...

Contributors
Perez, Irene, Yu, David, Janssen, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2015

Globalization, the process by which local social-ecological systems (SESs) are becoming linked in a global network, presents policy scientists and practitioners with unique and difficult challenges. Although local SESs can be extremely complex, when they become more tightly linked in the global system, complexity increases very rapidly as multi-scale and multi-level processes become more important. Here, we argue that addressing these multi-scale and multi-level challenges requires a collection of theories and models. We suggest that the conceptual domains of sustainability, resilience, and robustness provide a sufficiently rich collection of theories and models, but overlapping definitions and confusion about how these ...

Contributors
Anderies, John, Folke, Carl, Walker, Brian, et al.
Created Date
2013

The planetary boundary framework constitutes an opportunity for decision makers to define climate policy through the lens of adaptive governance. Here, we use the DICE model to analyze the set of adaptive climate policies that comply with the two planetary boundaries related to climate change: (1) staying below a CO[subscript 2] concentration of 550 ppm until 2100 and (2) returning to 350 ppm in 2100. Our results enable decision makers to assess the following milestones: (1) a minimum of 33% reduction of CO[subscript 2] emissions by 2055 in order to stay below 550 ppm by 2100 (this milestone goes up ...

Contributors
Mathias, Jean-Denis, Anderies, John, Janssen, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2017-02-07

Ecological models are a fundamental tool that archaeologists use to clarify our thinking about the processes that generate the archaeological record. Typically, arguments reasoned from a single model are bolstered by observing the consistency of ethnographic data with the argument. This validation of a model establishes that an argument is reasonable. In this paper, we attempt to move beyond validation by comparing the consistency of two arguments reasoned from different models that might explain corporate territorial ownership in a large ethnographic data set. Our results suggest that social dilemmas are an under appreciated mechanism that can drive the evolution of ...

Contributors
Freeman, Jacob, Anderies, John, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, et al.
Created Date
2015-02-01

On-going efforts to understand the dynamics of coupled social-ecological (or more broadly, coupled infrastructure) systems and common pool resources have led to the generation of numerous datasets based on a large number of case studies. This data has facilitated the identification of important factors and fundamental principles which increase our understanding of such complex systems. However, the data at our disposal are often not easily comparable, have limited scope and scale, and are based on disparate underlying frameworks inhibiting synthesis, meta-analysis, and the validation of findings. Research efforts are further hampered when case inclusion criteria, variable definitions, coding schema, and ...

Contributors
Ratajczyk, Elicia, Brady, Ute, Baggio, Jacopo, et al.
Created Date
2016-09-09

Governing common pool resources (CPR) in the face of disturbances such as globalization and climate change is challenging. The outcome of any CPR governance regime is the influenced by local combinations of social, institutional, and biophysical factors, as well as cross-scale interdependencies. In this study, we take a step towards understanding multiple-causation of CPR outcomes by analyzing 1) the co-occurrence of Destign Principles (DP) by activity (irrigation, fishery and forestry), and 2) the combination(s) of DPs leading to social and ecological success. We analyzed 69 cases pertaining to three different activities: irrigation, fishery, and forestry. We find that the importance ...

Contributors
Baggio, Jacopo, Barnett, Alain J., Perez, Irene, et al.
Created Date
2016-09-09

In 2013, the community of mathematical scientists and educators focused its collective attention on the mathematics of planet Earth. In the course of the year, a grassroots organization grew into an international partnership of more than 150 scientific societies, universities, research institutes, and organizations. The project, known as “Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013” (MPE2013), received the patronage of UNESCO and was a truly unique event. It brought the challenges facing our planet to the attention of the mathematics research community in numerous lectures, seminars, workshops, and special sessions at conferences of the professional societies; it sponsored the development of curriculum ...

Contributors
Anderies, John, Kaper, Hans G., Shuckburgh, Emily F., et al.
Created Date
2015-03-01