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ASU Scholarship Showcase


This growing collection consists of scholarly works authored by ASU-affiliated faculty, students and community members, and contains many open access articles. ASU-affiliated authors are encouraged to Share Your Work in the ASU Digital Repository.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2018


Patches of deposits containing unusual mafic minerals are observed in and around some large lunar impact craters. Numerical simulations suggest that in the slowest of these impacts, asteroidal material, alien to the Moon, could have survived.

Contributors
Asphaug, Erik, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Earth and Space Exploration
Created Date
2013-08-16

The probability of large seismic events on a particular fault segment may vary due to external stress changes imparted by nearby deformation events, including other earthquakes and aseismic processes, such as fault creep and postseismic relaxation. The Hayward fault (HF), undergoing both seismic and aseismic fault slip, provides a unique opportunity to study the mutual relation of seismic and aseismic processes on a fault system. We use surface deformation data obtained from InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar), creepmeters and alinement arrays, together with constraints provided by repeating earthquakes to investigate the kinematics of fault creep on the northern HF and …

Contributors
Shirzaei, Manoochehr, Buergmann, Roland, Taira, Taka'aki, et al.
Created Date
2013-09-05

Significant new opportunities for astrophysics and cosmology have been identified at low radio frequencies. The Murchison Widefield Array is the first telescope in the southern hemisphere designed specifically to explore the low-frequency astronomical sky between 80 and 300 MHz with arcminute angular resolution and high survey efficiency. The telescope will enable new advances along four key science themes, including searching for redshifted 21-cm emission from the EoR in the early Universe; Galactic and extragalactic all-sky southern hemisphere surveys; time-domain astrophysics; and solar, heliospheric, and ionospheric science and space weather. The Murchison Widefield Array is located in Western Australia at the …

Contributors
Bowman, Judd, Cairns, Iver, Kaplan, David L., et al.
Created Date
2013-10-28

Our knowledge of magma dynamics would be improved if geophysical data could be used to infer rheological constraints in melt-bearing zones. Geophysical images of the Earth's interior provide frozen snapshots of a dynamical system. However, knowledge of a rheological parameter such as viscosity would constrain the time-dependent dynamics of melt bearing zones. We propose a model that relates melt viscosity to electrical conductivity for naturally occurring melt compositions (including H2O) and temperature. Based on laboratory measurements of melt conductivity and viscosity, our model provides a rheological dimension to the interpretation of electromagnetic anomalies caused by melt and partially molten rocks …

Contributors
Pommier, Anne, Evans, Rob L., Key, Kerry, et al.
Created Date
2013-06-12

The southern Tibetan Plateau margin between ~ 83E and 86.5E is defined by an abrupt change from the low-relief Tibetan Plateau to the rugged topography and deep gorges of the Himalaya. This physiographic transition lies well to the north of active thrusting, and thus, the mechanism responsible for the distinct topographic break remains the focus of much debate. While numerous studies have utilized thermochronology to examine the exhumation history of the Himalaya, few have done so with respect to variations across the Himalaya-Tibetan Plateau transition. In this work, we examine the nature of the transition where it is accessible and …

Contributors
McDermott, Jeni, Whipple, Kelin, Hodges, Kip, et al.
Created Date
2013-05-30

Motivated by the seesaw mechanism for neutrinos which naturally generates small neutrino masses, we explore how a small grand-unified-theory-scale mixing between the standard model Higgs boson and an otherwise massless hidden sector scalar can naturally generate a small mass and vacuum expectation value for the new scalar which produces a false vacuum energy density contribution comparable to that of the observed dark energy dominating the current expansion of the Universe. This provides a simple and natural mechanism for producing the correct scale for dark energy, even if it does not address the long-standing question of why much larger dark energy …

Contributors
Krauss, Lawrence, Dent, James B., College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, et al.
Created Date
2013-08

A single fluid approximation which treats perturbations in baryons and dark matter as equal has sometimes been used to calculate the growth of linear matter density perturbations in the Universe. We demonstrate that properly accounting for the separate growth of baryon and dark matter fluctuations can change some predictions of structure formation in the linear domain in a way that can alter conclusions about the consistency between predictions and observations for ΛCDM models vs modified gravity scenarios. Our results may also be useful for 21 cm tomography constraints on alternative cosmological models for the formation of large scale structure.

Contributors
Krauss, Lawrence, Dent, James, De, Soma, et al.
Created Date
2013-02

We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z phot, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z [subscript phot] < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, …

Contributors
Littlejohns, Owen, Butler, Nathaniel, Cucchiara, A., et al.
Created Date
2014-07-01

As antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains emerge and pose increased global health risks, new antibacterial agents are needed as alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. Naturally occurring antibacterial clays have been identified which are effective in killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study examines a hydrothermally formed antibacterial clay deposit near Crater Lake, OR (USA). Our hypothesis is that antibacterial clays buffer pH and Eh conditions to dissolve unstable mineral phases containing transition metals (primarily Fe[superscript 2+]), while smectite interlayers serve as reservoirs for time release of bactericidal components. Model pathogens (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 14990) were incubated with clays from different …

Contributors
Morrison, Keith, Underwood, Jennifer C., Metge, David W., et al.
Created Date
2014-08-01

In situ multianvil press (MAP) studies have reported that the depth and the Clapeyron slope of the postspinel boundary are significantly less than those of the 660 km discontinuity inferred from seismic studies. These results have raised questions about whether the postspinel transition is associated with the discontinuity. We determined the postspinel transition in pyrolitic compositions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) combined with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The Clapeyron slope was determined to be −2.5 ± 0.4MPa/K and did not vary significantly with compositions and used pressure scales. Using Pt scales, our data indicate that the postspinel …

Contributors
Ye, Yu, Gu, Chen, Shim, Sang-Heon, et al.
Created Date
2014-06-16