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ASU Scholarship Showcase


This growing collection consists of scholarly works authored by ASU-affiliated faculty, students and community members, and contains many open access articles. ASU-affiliated authors are encouraged to Share Your Work in the ASU Digital Repository.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2020


Thermal imagery is widely used to quantify land surface temperatures to monitor the spatial extent and thermal intensity of the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Previous research has applied Landsat images, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) images, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images, and other coarse- to medium-resolution remotely sensed imagery to estimate surface temperature. These data are frequently correlated with vegetation, impervious surfaces, and temperature to quantify the drivers of the UHI effect. Because of the coarse- to medium-resolution of the thermal imagery, researchers are unable to correlate these temperature data with the more generally available …

Contributors
Zhao, Qunshan, Wentz, Elizabeth, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, et al.
Created Date
2016-06-06

This primer provides a practical guide to get started with spatial interaction modeling using the SpInt module in the python spatial analysis library (PySAL).

Contributors
Oshan, Taylor, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning
Created Date
2016-11-07

Background Most excess deaths that occur during extreme hot weather events do not have natural heat recorded as an underlying or contributing cause. This study aims to identify the specific individuals who died because of hot weather using only secondary data. A novel approach was developed in which the expected number of deaths was repeatedly sampled from all deaths that occurred during a hot weather event, and compared with deaths during a control period. The deaths were compared with respect to five factors known to be associated with hot weather mortality. Individuals were ranked by their presence in significant models …

Contributors
Henderson, Sarah B., Gauld, Jillian S., Rauch, Stephen A., et al.
Created Date
2016-11-15

We assembled daily maximum and minimum temperature records for 31 stations throughout Iran over the period 1961–2010. As with many other areas of the world, we found that both the maximum and minimum temperatures were increasing overall with the minimum temperatures increasing twice as fast as the maximum temperatures. We gathered population data for the stations near the beginning and end of the temperature records and found in all seasons and for both the maximum and minimum temperatures the magnitude of population growth positively influenced the temperature trends. However, unlike so many other studies, we found the strongest population growth …

Contributors
Sen Roy, Shouraseni, Sadegh Keikhosravi Kiany, Mohammad, Balling, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2016-08-11

The effects of urbanization on ozone levels have been widely investigated over cities primarily located in temperate and/or humid regions. In this study, nested WRF-Chem simulations with a finest grid resolution of 1 km are conducted to investigate ozone concentrations [O[subscript 3]] due to urbanization within cities in arid/semi-arid environments. First, a method based on a shape preserving Monotonic Cubic Interpolation (MCI) is developed and used to downscale anthropogenic emissions from the 4 km resolution 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI05) to the finest model resolution of 1 km. Using the rapidly expanding Phoenix metropolitan region as the area of focus, …

Contributors
Li, Jialun, Georgescu, Matei, Hyde, Peter, et al.
Created Date
2014-11-01

BACKGROUND: Multiple methods are employed for modeling adaptation when projecting the impact of climate change on heat-related mortality. The sensitivity of impacts to each is unknown because they have never been systematically compared. In addition, little is known about the relative sensitivity of impacts to “adaptation uncertainty” (i.e., the inclusion/exclusion of adaptation modeling) relative to using multiple climate models and emissions scenarios. OBJECTIVES: This study had three aims: a) Compare the range in projected impacts that arises from using different adaptation modeling methods; b) compare the range in impacts that arises from adaptation uncertainty with ranges from using multiple climate …

Contributors
Gosling, Simon N., Hondula, David, Bunker, Aditi, et al.
Created Date
2017-08-16

Background With Pennsylvania currently considering a move away from an Alcohol Beverage Control state to a privatized alcohol distribution system, this study uses a spatial analytical approach to examine potential impacts of privatization on the number and spatial distribution of alcohol outlets in the city of Philadelphia over a long time horizon. Methods A suite of geospatial data were acquired for Philadelphia, including 1,964 alcohol outlet locations, 569,928 land parcels, and school, church, hospital, park and playground locations. These data were used as inputs for exploratory spatial analysis to estimate the expected number of outlets that would eventually operate in …

Contributors
Grubesic, Tony H., Murray, Alan, Pridemore, William Alex, et al.
Created Date
2012-11-21

A measure of shape compactness is a numerical quantity representing the degree to which a shape is compact. Ways to provide an accurate measure have been given great attention due to its application in a broad range of GIS problems, such as detecting clustering patterns from remote-sensing images, understanding urban sprawl, and redrawing electoral districts to avoid gerrymandering. In this article, we propose an effective and efficient approach to computing shape compactness based on the moment of inertia (MI), a well-known concept in physics. The mathematical framework and the computer implementation for both raster and vector models are discussed in …

Contributors
Li, Wenwen, Goodchild, Michael F., Church, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2013-08-15

Evolving Earth observation and change detection techniques enable the automatic identification of Land Use and Land Cover Change (LULCC) over a large extent from massive amounts of remote sensing data. It at the same time poses a major challenge in effective organization, representation and modeling of such information. This study proposes and implements an integrated computational framework to support the modeling, semantic and spatial reasoning of change information with regard to space, time and topology. We first proposed a conceptual model to formally represent the spatiotemporal variation of change data, which is essential knowledge to support various environmental and social …

Contributors
Li, Wenwen, Zhou, Xiran, Wu, Sheng, et al.
Created Date
2016-09-30

The Arctic, even more so than other parts of the world, has warmed substantially over the past few decades. Temperature and humidity influence the rate of development, survival and reproduction of pathogens and thus the incidence and prevalence of many infectious diseases. Higher temperatures may also allow infected host species to survive winters in larger numbers, increase the population size and expand their habitat range. The impact of these changes on human disease in the Arctic has not been fully evaluated. There is concern that climate change may shift the geographic and temporal distribution of a range of infectious diseases. …

Contributors
Parkinson, Alan J., Evengard, Birgitta, Semenza, Jan C., et al.
Created Date
2014-09-30