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Arizona State and Local Government Documents Collection


The State And Local Arizona Documents (SALAD) collection contains documents published by the State of Arizona, its Counties, incorporated Cities or Towns, or affiliated Councils of Government; documents produced under the auspices of a state or local agency, board, commission or department, including reports made to these units; and Salt River Project, a licensed municipality. ASU is a primary collector of state publications and makes a concerted effort to acquire and catalog most materials published by state and local governmental agencies.

The ASU Digital Repository provides access to digital SALAD publications, however the ASU Libraries’ non-digitized Arizona documents can be searched through the ASU Libraries Catalog. For additional assistance, Ask A Government Documents Librarian.

Publications issued by the Morrison Institute for Public Programs at Arizona State University are available in the ASU Digital Repository Morrison Institute for Public Policy - Publications Archive collection.


Date Range
2005 2012


This is a summary of several reports related to government finance in Arizona that have been produced by the Office of the University Economist since December 2008. Some new information has been added in an attempt to provide a complete picture. The format of this report is a brief summary by issue, sometimes accompanied by a table or chart. References are provided to the report and the page number where additional detail can be found.

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., Center for Competitiveness and Prosperity Research, et al.
Created Date
2009-03

Summary -- State government functions delineated in the Arizona Constitution -- Interpretation of constitutional duties -- Description of expenditure data -- Methodology for assessing government expenditures -- History of government expenditures -- Societal changes and the effect on public expenditures -- Educational achievement and attainment -- Reasonable levels of investment in education.

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., Center for Competitiveness and Prosperity Research, et al.
Created Date
2010

Following an analysis of economic conditions, this paper examines actions that can be taken by state governments to stimulate the economy. The only action that results in a significant near-term effect is to accelerate spending on physical infrastructure that has already been identified as needed.

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., Center for Competitiveness and Prosperity Research, et al.
Created Date
2011-10

An examination of public funding for elementary and secondary education and higher education in Arizona from historical and interstate perspectives, in light of the funding mandate expressed in the Arizona Constitution. An evaluation of public education in Arizona is included.

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., Center for Competitiveness and Prosperity Research, et al.
Created Date
2009-01

The purpose of the stabilization fund is to reduce the fluctuations in general fund revenue caused by the economic cycle. These fluctuations result in large budget surpluses in some years and large deficits in other years. Without considering the structural deficit, the budget stabilization fund almost certainly will not have the funding necessary to offset the cyclical reduction in revenue that will occur during the next recession.

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., Center for Competitiveness and Prosperity Research, et al.
Created Date
2012-06

Education decisions are among the most important choices people ever make. So we were surprised and disappointed to see an article so loosely reasoned and reckless in its conclusions as “Five Reasons to Skip College” published in Blank Slate at Forbes.com on April 18, 2006. The article never provides a numerical assessment of the costs and benefits of going to college, uses statistics inappropriately and in a way that biases the conclusions against college, contains conceptual errors on how to evaluate the return on a college education, and greatly exaggerates the only substantive criticism of typical evaluations of the financial ...

Contributors
Hill, John K., Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., et al.
Created Date
2006-05

This paper complements a detailed assessment of job quality, based on analysis of industrial and occupational mix, recently completed by the Seidman Institute’s Center for Business Research. The overall conclusions in this report are consistent with those of the more extensive CBR research. Arizona’s economy grows very rapidly, but per person or per worker measures of wages, compensation, incomes, and gross state product are below the national average. No evidence exists that the situation is improving appreciably (or deteriorating). Indeed, the state appears to be creating income, wealth and quality jobs at rates that are similar to those displayed by ...

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Productivity and Prosperity Project, Center for Competitiveness and Prosperity Research
Created Date
2005-03

Economic convergence was only a matter of time for Ireland. That it happened when it did and in such a short period of time was the result of both thoughtful decision-making on the part of many stakeholders and a favorable set of external economic developments. To continue to achieve rapid economic growth, however, Ireland will not be able to rely on increased labor utilization but must succeed in raising output per worker. This, in turn, will require more entrepreneurial activity and participation higher value-added activities. Ireland will need to participate more in the creation of knowledge and not simply be ...

Contributors
Hill, John K., Hoffman, Dennis L., Hoffman, Mary K., et al.
Created Date
2005-06

The condition of Arizona’s infrastructure has a direct impact on economic productivity and quality of life. As economic competition expands domestically and globally, and as the knowledge economy evolves, the importance of a strong infrastructure increases. Education, in particular, is of growing importance. Arizona’s infrastructure challenges will require commitment and creativity to meet the needs and potential of 10 million people and to ensure a positive future for the state.

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., Center for Competitiveness and Prosperity Research
Created Date
2008-11

A landmark assessment of infrastructure needs in Arizona was produced by the L. William Seidman Research Institute in May 2008 for the Arizona Investment Council (AIC): "Infrastructure Needs and Funding Alternatives for Arizona: 2008-2032", that addressed infrastructure needs in four categories: energy, telecommunications, transportation, and water and wastewater. The information from the AIC report is a major input to the report that follows. Other types of infrastructure — most notably education, health care, and public safety — also are analyzed here to provide a more complete picture of infrastructure needs in Arizona. The goals of this report are to place ...

Contributors
Hoffman, Dennis L., Rex, Tom R., Productivity and Prosperity Project, et al.
Created Date
2008-10