Arizona State and Local Government Documents Collection

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Lake Pleasant has historically been regarded as one of the premier largemouth bass (Micropteus salmoides) fisheries in Arizona. However, the quality of the largemouth bass fishery has decreased, resulting in low angler satisfaction and a general concern for the health of the fishery. The leading hypothesis for the cause of this decline is the recent invasion of striped bass (Morone saxatilis), which may be responsible, in part, for the shift in largemouth bass size structure through competition for resources and predation.

Contributors
Stewart, Bill, Meding, Marianne, Rogers, Diana D., et al.
Created Date
2008-02

The goal of our study was to develop information to help manage aquatic plants in Arizona’s reservoirs to benefit sport fish management activities and angler access. To attain this goal we surveyed aquatic plants in reservoirs throughout Arizona and evaluated if the Arizona Game and Fish Department’s aquatic weed harvesting program was benefiting the fisheries program. Aquatic plant harvesting is probably a worthwhile endeavor to improve angler access and keep our angling customers satisfied. However, we strongly recommend that more effective decontamination procedures be implemented to limit the spread of invasive species

Contributors
Robinson, Anthony T., Fulmer, James E., Avenetti, Lorraine D., et al.
Created Date
2007-11

Water developments are a widely used wildlife management tool in the arid Southwest. The ecological effects of those facilities have received little study and remain a source of controversy. We studied direct and indirect effects of wildlife water developments in southwestern Arizona from 1999-2003. Our results did not support hypothesized negative impacts suggested by critics of wildlife water development programs.

Contributors
Rosenstock, Steven S., Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2004

Apache trout is a federally threatened salmonid native to headwaters of the Little Colorado, Black, and White rivers in east-central Arizona. Decline of Apache trout to threatened status was attributed to over-fishing, habitat degradation and negative interactions (predation, competition and hybridization) with introduced nonnative salmonids. Although over-fishing is no longer considered a threat, habitat degradation and negative interactions with nonnative salmonids continue to threaten Apache trout, and it is towards these threats that recovery actions are directed. While barrier construction began in 1979 and livestock exclusion began in the mid-1980s, the efficacy of these recovery actions at increasing Apache trout ...

Contributors
Robinson, Anthony T., Avenetti, Lorraine D., Cantrell, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2004

Effective integration of prescriptions employing aggregated retention of forest structure important to squirrels and other wildlife, reconstruction-based restoration prescriptions, and meso-reserves has the potential to optimize attainment of ponderosa pine forest ecosystem restoration and wildlife population goals.

Contributors
Dodd, Norris L, Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2003-07

Depending on wildlife species mobility and habitat requirements, we suspect that fire affect species differently, especially on sky islands where whole habitats could be reduced in size or destroyed. We evaluated effects of fire and vegetation destruction on low, moderate, and high mobility wildlife species. Specifically, we focused on the following species or groups: lizards; small mammals, primarily rodents; mid-sized carnivores, specifically gray fox, bobcats, and coyotes; and black bears.

Contributors
Cunningham, Stanley C., Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2001-08

Although not Federally listed as threatened or endangered, the roundtail chub, also a sportfish in Arizona, is nearly extirpated from sections of the Verde and Salt river drainages. The purpose of this investigation, from March 1998 through March 2000, was to describe ecological requirements and population dynamics of roundtail chub. The objectives were to describe species composition, distribution and abundance, quantify habitat selection by different life stages, estimate population size, quantify movement and age and growth, and describe the reproductive capacity of roundtail chub.

Contributors
Brouder, Mark J., Rogers, Diana D., Avenetti, Lorraine D., et al.
Created Date
2000-07

In Arizona, various nonnative trout have been stocked since the early 1900s, and trout angling remains an important component of the sportfishing industry. These nonnative rainbow trout may have contributed to the decline of Little Colorado spinedace. The overall purpose of the research was to define interactions so that impacts to both trout management and spinedace populations can be minimized. Our objectives covered 5 broad areas of potential interaction: habitat use, diet, predation, health, and distribution.

Contributors
Robinson, Anthony T., Bryan, Scott D., Sweetser, Michael G., et al.
Created Date
2000-06

Since European settlement, pinyon-juniper woodlands have expanded into large portions of the southwestern United States historically occupied by grassland vegetation. Because grassland bird species are closely tied to vegetation structure, woodland expansion can substantially change the composition of breeding bird communities.

Contributors
Rosenstock, Steven S., Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
1999-12

The State And Local Arizona Documents (SALAD) collection contains documents published by the State of Arizona, its Counties, incorporated Cities or Towns, or affiliated Councils of Government; documents produced under the auspices of a state or local agency, board, commission or department, including reports made to these units; and Salt River Project, a licensed municipality. ASU is a primary collector of state publications and makes a concerted effort to acquire and catalog most materials published by state and local governmental agencies.

The ASU Digital Repository provides access to digital SALAD publications, however the ASU Libraries’ non-digitized Arizona documents can be searched through the ASU Libraries Catalog and Library One Search. For additional assistance, Ask A Government Documents Librarian.

Publications issued by the Morrison Institute for Public Programs at Arizona State University are available in the ASU Digital Repository Morrison Institute for Public Policy - Publications Archive collection.