Arizona State and Local Government Documents Collection

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The Mexican gray wolf subspecies was listed as endangered in 1976. In 1998 a nonessential experimental population was established in New Mexico and Arizona. Eleven captive-born and reared animals were released into the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area. In June 2007, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contracted with D.J. Case and Associates to assist in planning and implementing public input for a scoping process to identify issues to consider in developing alternatives preparatory to development of a new Environmental Impact Statement for the Mexican gray wolf introduction program.

Contributors
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, D. J. Case & Associates, Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2008-05-22

One goal of the SDCP was to obtain a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under Section 10 of the Endangered Species Act to enable incidental take of species protected by the ESA in the course of development in Pima County. This report provides the county with the framework to go forward and further its analysis of the final funding costs for a Section 10 Permit.

Contributors
EIS Corporation, SWCA, Inc., Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2003-05

Two additional sets of fact sheets that describe the threatened, endangered and priority vulnerable species of Pima County. For each plant or animal there is a physical description and full color illustration. The habitat, range, diet, status, and history of each species is also outlined. These fact sheets will be widely distributed through the youth participation program.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2002-09

Fact sheets that describe the threatened, endangered and priority vulnerable species of Pima County. For each plant or animal there is a physical description and full color illustration. The habitat, range, diet, status, and history of each species is also outlined. These fact sheets will be widely distributed through the youth participation program.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2002-09

Certain concepts related to the environment, particularly the conservation of biological and cultural resources, have been integrated into the Comprehensive Land Use Plan of Pima County. The attached cost model has been prepared to frame the issue of the estimated cost of Endangered Species Act compliance under the present planning model.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2002-05-23

Provides a detailed description of plants and animals that are being considered as potentially covered under the multi-species program, organized by taxonomic group. Two strong themes emerge when this compilation of species accounts is read together: one is the enormous importance of aquatic and riparian-based habitats to the majority of priority vulnerable species, and the other is the very bleak biological status of the riparian system.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2000-06

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is the lead agency responsible for recovery of the Mexican wolf, pursuant to the Endangered Species Act. The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program essentially is separated into two, interrelated components: 1) Recovery – includes aspects of the program administered primarily by the Service that pertain to the overall goal of Mexican wolf recovery and delisting from the list of threatened and endangered species, and 2) Reintroduction – includes aspects of the program implemented by the Service and cooperating States, Tribes, and other Federal agencies that pertain to management of the reintroduced Mexican wolf population ...

Contributors
Arizona. Game and Fish Department, New Mexico. Department of Game and Fish, White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona
Created Date
2001/2008

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the lead agency responsible for recovery of the Mexican wolf, pursuant to the Endangered Species Act. The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program essentially is separated into two, interrelated components: 1) Recovery – includes aspects of the program administered primarily by the Service that pertain to the overall goal of Mexican wolf recovery and delisting from the list of threatened and endangered species, and 2) Reintroduction – includes aspects of the program implemented by the Service and cooperating States, Tribes, and other Federal agencies that pertain to management of the reintroduced Mexican wolf population in ...

Contributors
Arizona. Game and Fish Department, New Mexico. Department of Game and Fish, White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona
Created Date
2001/2015

Whether reintroduction and recovery should be allowed, and if so where and how, were hotly debated through the 1990s, when reintroduction was formally proposed. They still are. Regardless, the proposal process ended with a nonessential experimental population rule (hereafter Final Rule) approved on January 12, 1998. In keeping with the stated experimental nature of the reintroduction effort, and respectful of the doubts expressed by many, the Final Rule required full evaluations after 3 and 5 years to recommend continuation, modification, or termination of the Reintroduction Project. The 3-Year Review, conducted in 2001, concluded that reintroduction should continue, albeit with important ...

Contributors
Mexican Wolf Blue Range Adaptive Management Oversight Committee, Arizona. Game and Fish Department, New Mexico. Department of Game and Fish, et al.
Created Date
2005-12-31

The Jaguar Conservation Agreement provides opportunities and incentives for interested parties to become involved with conservation activities. These activities include collection of biological information (to provide a sound scientific basis for decisions); consideration of relevant cultural, economic, and political factors; design and implementation of a comprehensive approach to conservation (including public education); and monitoring, evaluation, and feedback. This summary will focus on the mapping efforts and make recommendations to the Jaguar Conservation Team on conservation measures for potential jaguar habitat.

Contributors
Van Pelt, William E., Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2006-04

The State And Local Arizona Documents (SALAD) collection contains documents published by the State of Arizona, its Counties, incorporated Cities or Towns, or affiliated Councils of Government; documents produced under the auspices of a state or local agency, board, commission or department, including reports made to these units; and Salt River Project, a licensed municipality. ASU is a primary collector of state publications and makes a concerted effort to acquire and catalog most materials published by state and local governmental agencies.

The ASU Digital Repository provides access to digital SALAD publications, however the ASU Libraries’ non-digitized Arizona documents can be searched through the ASU Libraries Catalog and Library One Search. For additional assistance, Ask A Government Documents Librarian.

Publications issued by the Morrison Institute for Public Programs at Arizona State University are available in the ASU Digital Repository Morrison Institute for Public Policy - Publications Archive collection.