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Arizona State and Local Government Documents Collection


Identifies key potential threats and stressors to vulnerable species in Pima County, and to the biological and hydrological resources that support these species. Emphasis has been placed on identifying the specific components of past, existing, and proposed land and water uses that pose the greatest potential threats over the next 30 years to focal species and special habitats, plant associations, and communities.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2000-03

The Arizona population of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl was listed as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act in 1997. Historical records and recent surveys definitely show a decline of species. There is a wealth of historical information out there and it still trickles in every day.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1999

The southwestern United States and Sonora, Mexico are the extreme northern limits of the jaguar’s (Panthera onca) range, which primarily extends from central Mexico south through Central and South America to northern Argentina. Recently, the jaguar ranged as far north as Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Over the last century, the jaguar’s range has been reduced to approximately 46% of its historic range due to hunting pressure and habitat loss. The greatest loss of occupied range has occurred in the southern United States, northern Mexico, northern Brazil, and southern Argentina. Since 1900, jaguars have been documented occasionally in the southwestern ...

Contributors
Hatten, James R., Averill-Murray, Annalaura, Van Pelt, William E., et al.
Created Date
2003-01

On March 2, 1999, the Board of Supervisors of Pima County, Arizona adopted the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan. This Plan is the largest and most comprehensive regional multi-species conservation plan in the United States. These memorandums of understanding record the agreements made with cooperating agencies.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). Board of Supervisors, Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1998/2003

Certain concepts related to the environment, particularly the conservation of biological and cultural resources, have been integrated into the Comprehensive Land Use Plan of Pima County. The attached cost model has been prepared to frame the issue of the estimated cost of Endangered Species Act compliance under the present planning model.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2002-05-23

When we talk about Constitutional issues in relation to the Act, we are really asking is there a likelihood that it is unconstitutional in part or as applied to particular situations? The first risk is that some parts of it will be held to have been beyond the power of Congress to enact because they are not permissible exercises of the Interstate Commerce power. The second issue is the application of the Act to certain tracts of private property in a manner that would deprive that property of all beneficial use and constitute a taking of property. The third is ...

Contributors
Bosselman, Fred P., Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1999

This report utilizes criteria developed by the Habitat Subcommittee of the Jaguar Conservation Team to identify suitable jaguar habitat in New Mexico. In July 2003, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish also issued a report on jaguar habitat, along with accompanying maps.4 However, in an August 2004 meeting of the Habitat Subcommittee in Albuquerque, members who were present during the development of the habitat criteria between 1998 and 2000 reviewed the New Mexico report, concluded it was based on criteria different from those they had agreed to, further noted that it explicitly refrained from identifying suitable jaguar habitat, ...

Contributors
Robinson, Michael J., Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2006-01

Demonstrates that an effort to protect only listed species would lead to a reserve that was closer to the urbanizing areas of Tucson, and therefore more expensive. The Listed Species Reserve is also one that makes a call on more non-federal land. By limiting the focus of the reserve to listed species, the broader and long term benefits are lost, and trade-offs of high potential habitat are not based on such comprehensive biological principles.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2002-04

Whether reintroduction and recovery should be allowed, and if so where and how, were hotly debated through the 1990s, when reintroduction was formally proposed. They still are. Regardless, the proposal process ended with a nonessential experimental population rule (hereafter Final Rule) approved on January 12, 1998. In keeping with the stated experimental nature of the reintroduction effort, and respectful of the doubts expressed by many, the Final Rule required full evaluations after 3 and 5 years to recommend continuation, modification, or termination of the Reintroduction Project. The 3-Year Review, conducted in 2001, concluded that reintroduction should continue, albeit with important ...

Contributors
Mexican Wolf Blue Range Adaptive Management Oversight Committee, Arizona. Game and Fish Department, New Mexico. Department of Game and Fish, et al.
Created Date
2005-12-31

The Mexican gray wolf subspecies was listed as endangered in 1976. In 1998 a nonessential experimental population was established in New Mexico and Arizona. Eleven captive-born and reared animals were released into the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area. In June 2007, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contracted with D.J. Case and Associates to assist in planning and implementing public input for a scoping process to identify issues to consider in developing alternatives preparatory to development of a new Environmental Impact Statement for the Mexican gray wolf introduction program.

Contributors
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, D. J. Case & Associates, Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2008-05-22

The State And Local Arizona Documents (SALAD) collection contains documents published by the State of Arizona, its Counties, incorporated Cities or Towns, or affiliated Councils of Government; documents produced under the auspices of a state or local agency, board, commission or department, including reports made to these units; and Salt River Project, a licensed municipality. ASU is a primary collector of state publications and makes a concerted effort to acquire and catalog most materials published by state and local governmental agencies.

The ASU Digital Repository provides access to digital SALAD publications, however the ASU Libraries’ non-digitized Arizona documents can be searched through the ASU Libraries Catalog. For additional assistance, Ask A Government Documents Librarian.

Publications issued by the Morrison Institute for Public Programs at Arizona State University are available in the ASU Digital Repository Morrison Institute for Public Policy - Publications Archive collection.