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Arizona State and Local Government Documents Collection


The State And Local Arizona Documents (SALAD) collection contains documents published by the State of Arizona, its Counties, incorporated Cities or Towns, or affiliated Councils of Government; documents produced under the auspices of a state or local agency, board, commission or department, including reports made to these units; and Salt River Project, a licensed municipality. ASU is a primary collector of state publications and makes a concerted effort to acquire and catalog most materials published by state and local governmental agencies.

The ASU Digital Repository provides access to digital SALAD publications, however the ASU Libraries’ non-digitized Arizona documents can be searched through the ASU Libraries Catalog. For additional assistance, Ask A Government Documents Librarian.

Publications issued by the Morrison Institute for Public Programs at Arizona State University are available in the ASU Digital Repository Morrison Institute for Public Policy - Publications Archive collection.


Date Range
1993 2013


This addendum to the 2005 work plan identifies how additional assessment of groundwater features and contamination at Cave Creek Landfill will be conducted.

Contributors
AMEC Earth and Environmental, Maricopa County (Ariz.). Solid Waste Management Department
Created Date
2009-05-11

This Additional Site Characterization Work Plan presents a strategy for collecting site characterization information at the closed Maricopa County Cave Creek Landfill to support ongoing remedial action planning for trichloroethene-impacted groundwater underlying the site. The Work Plan supplements previous remedial investigation work plans prepared to characterize the nature and extent of site contamination.

Contributors
AMEC Earth and Environmental, Maricopa County (Ariz.). Risk Management Department, Maricopa County (Ariz.). Waste Resources and Recycling Management Department
Created Date
2012-11-19

A majority of the work performed by ADEQ's Nonpoint Source Program is funded by Clean Water Act grants, awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency which requires States to report annually on progress in meeting the schedule of milestones contained in their nonpoint source management plans, and report reductions in nonpoint source pollutant loadings and improvement in water quality resulting from program implementation.

Contributors
Arizona. Department of Environmental Quality, Arizona. Office of Water Quality
Created Date
2004/2013

During the period of 1965 through 1984, Maricopa County operated a landfill leased from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. In 1982 the County leased a separate parcel from the State for the development of a new landfill. The landfill stopped accepting waste in 1998.

Contributors
Bryan A. Stirrat & Associates, Maricopa County (Ariz.). Solid Waste Management Department
Created Date
2005-08-26

This document has been prepared to fulfill the requirements for a hydraulic study for the Cave Creek Landfill operated by Maricopa County.

Contributors
Dames & Moore, Maricopa County (Ariz.). Solid Waste Management Department
Created Date
1993-09-17

In March 2004, a resident of Cornville contacted the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality to request information on arsenic in drinking water. The resident collected six well water samples from their own well and neighbors’ wells and submitted them to a private laboratory for arsenic analysis. The analyses detected arsenic ranging from 15 to 952 μg/L. ADEQ and the community members asked the Arizona Department of Health Services to provide health information about using the water. Initial conversations with the well owner and other community members revealed that many people had concerns about potential health effects from arsenic exposure.

Contributors
Arizona. Office of Environmental Health, Hasty, Brian W.
Created Date
2004

This health consultation evaluates tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, perc, PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) results obtained from groundwater monitoring wells in 2004. The primary public health concerns were exposures to children by incidental contact with groundwater used for watering yards and potential exposures from using groundwater for drinking water. Another concern was contamination migrating beyond the site boundaries in two groundwater aquifers.

Contributors
Arizona. Office of Environmental Health
Created Date
2005

In September 2005, some concerned Walker residents contacted the Arizona Department of Health Services in regards to the quality of groundwater in the area. The residents petitioned ADHS to perform well water tests to determine the character of the water, and whether there is any potential health risk associated with consuming or using the water. In response to the concerned community members and in agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, ADHS collected water samples from the site and completed a health consultation. This health consultation evaluates if the levels of lead and other metals in the ...

Contributors
Arizona. Office of Environmental Health, Lin, Hsin-I, Botsford, Jennifer
Created Date
2007-03-06

Local residents expressed their concerns regarding the tailings from the Iron King Mine and Humboldt Smelter at Dewey-Humboldt, AZ. The purpose of this health consultation is to evaluate the available water and soil sampling results to determine if the detected metal levels pose adverse health effects when residents come into contact with the water or soil. In 2008, EPA initiated the field investigation portion of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study for the Site. The primary objectives of the RI/FS are to determine the nature and extent of contamination and to gather sufficient information so that EPA can select a ...

Contributors
Arizona. Office of Environmental Health, Lin, Hsin-I, Botsford, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2009-03-26

The purpose of this health consultation is to determine whether contaminants in groundwater from the Motorola 56th Street facility represent a threat to public health. The facility was first occupied in the spring of 1950 as the Western Military Electronics Center. From 1950 to 1958, it was primarily used for bench type electronics, electronic assembly, and semiconductor production. The chemicals used in these processes included solvent degreasers such as trichloroethylene, acetone, and freon, and metals such as cadmium, chromium, and arsenic. From 1959 through 1961, the facility was used primarily for document storage. Beginning in 1962, manufacturing of electronics resumed ...

Contributors
Arizona. Office of Environmental Health, Hasty, Brian W., Humble, Will
Created Date
2003