Skip to main content

Arizona State and Local Government Documents Collection


The State And Local Arizona Documents (SALAD) collection contains documents published by the State of Arizona, its Counties, incorporated Cities or Towns, or affiliated Councils of Government; documents produced under the auspices of a state or local agency, board, commission or department, including reports made to these units; and Salt River Project, a licensed municipality. ASU is a primary collector of state publications and makes a concerted effort to acquire and catalog most materials published by state and local governmental agencies.

The ASU Digital Repository provides access to digital SALAD publications, however the ASU Libraries’ non-digitized Arizona documents can be searched through the ASU Libraries Catalog. For additional assistance, Ask A Government Documents Librarian.

Publications issued by the Morrison Institute for Public Programs at Arizona State University are available in the ASU Digital Repository Morrison Institute for Public Policy - Publications Archive collection.


On March 2, 1999, the Board of Supervisors of Pima County, Arizona adopted the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan. This Plan is the largest and most comprehensive regional multi-species conservation plan in the United States. These memorandums of understanding record the agreements made with cooperating agencies.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). Board of Supervisors, Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1998/2003

Over the past decade, a number of high-profile, regional-scale habitat conservation plans have been developed by local governments to address the conflict between the Endangered Species Act and land use planning issues. Three of these planning efforts are compared based on Pima County's specific experience.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2002

With the passage of the Federal Endangered Species Act in 1973, the stage was set for a confrontation between urban development and the provisions of Federal Law. Language was amended to the Act that established standards that a plan would have to meet before the Fish and Wildlife Service could approve it and issue a permit for the take of a listed species. In those jurisdictions that have adopted this approach, conservation of natural resources is no longer an afterthought but a major element that has to be considered during the regular land use permitting process.

Contributors
Kobetich, Gail, Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1999

Provides an overview of the issues related to monitoring the 36 species proposed for coverage under the forthcoming Section 10 permit to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. By integrating the requirements for MSCP compliance and effectiveness monitoring with the challenges inherent in single-species monitoring, this document seeks a balance between species-specific monitoring and other habitat, ecosystem and threats-based measures (parameters). By designing such a program, Pima County will be in a better position to anticipate and adjust management actions for the conservation of covered species and the ecosystems that support them.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2008-08-18

The Multiple Species Conservation Plan will complete the land use planning process in a conflict between competing interests on the question of growth. A path of balance was chosen by advancing the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan. This second draft will be posted on the website and distributed to interested community and committee members. A public process will be conducted so that during 200t the document can be finalized and submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the application for a federal endangered species permit.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2005-02-03

The continued growth of the human-built environment in Pima County, Arizona will result in the “incidental take” of species that are listed under the Endangered Species Act. To avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to both listed and unlisted species and their habitats, Pima County is submitting this Multi-species Conservation Plan for 44 species that may be impacted as a result of the otherwise lawful activities of Pima County and its development community. The Incidental Take Permit, also called a Section 10 permit, will be for 30 years. This MSCP is part of the required documentation needed to receive an Incidental ...

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2012-11

Pima County is now finalizing the long-awaited Multi-species Conservation Plan, which, if approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will streamline public-sector and private-sector development compliance with the Endangered Species Act while protecting endangered species and their habitats. In the coming months, the public will have a chance to comment on the MSCP through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s formal public comment process before it goes to the County Board of Supervisors for final adoption.This report reviews the history of the MSCP, its relationship with the award-winning Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan, what benefits the MSCP will bring to ...

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2012-11

What has been developed in Orange and San Diego County, Calif. are blueprints for other urbanizing communities committed to striking a balance between growth and development and environmental quality and its notion of livability. These plans successfully put in place conservation measures unprecedented in their scope and breadth and yet do so without compromising the economic vitality of the region.

Contributors
Ebbin, Marc, Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1999

This strategic plan reflects the references of Arizona's citizens as they relate to management of Arizona's wildlife-oriented recreation. It also reflects the biological principles involved in managing Arizona's wildlife.

Contributors
Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2001-01-22

This strategic plan identifies the management direction that the Arizona Game and Fish Commission has provided to the Department for the next six years. The plan discusses the most important issues facing the Department, including the recruitment and retention of hunters, anglers and shooting sports participants, and explains how the Department plans to respond to those issues. Prior strategic plans focused on just one of the programmatic areas for which the Department is responsible; for example, Wildlife 2006 was solely a wildlife strategic plan. In contrast, Wildlife 2012 provides strategic guidance for all programs within the Arizona Game and Fish ...

Contributors
Arizona. Game and Fish Department
Created Date
2006-08