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Arizona State and Local Government Documents Collection


The State And Local Arizona Documents (SALAD) collection contains documents published by the State of Arizona, its Counties, incorporated Cities or Towns, or affiliated Councils of Government; documents produced under the auspices of a state or local agency, board, commission or department, including reports made to these units; and Salt River Project, a licensed municipality. ASU is a primary collector of state publications and makes a concerted effort to acquire and catalog most materials published by state and local governmental agencies.

The ASU Digital Repository provides access to digital SALAD publications, however the ASU Libraries’ non-digitized Arizona documents can be searched through the ASU Libraries Catalog. For additional assistance, Ask A Government Documents Librarian.

Publications issued by the Morrison Institute for Public Programs at Arizona State University are available in the ASU Digital Repository Morrison Institute for Public Policy - Publications Archive collection.


This is a non-time opportunity for Pima County to preserve the Bar V Ranch property that has countless benefits. From landscape connectivity for wildlife, to a significant water source for Cienega Creek and the Tucson Basin, to important riparian habitat crucial for the survival of several vulnerable species.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2004-12

Most of the state's cattle ranches rely solely on rain-fed range to support their herds. Drought conditions can result in significant declines in forage production and nutritional quality. Failure to respond to these changes with appropriate management can compound the effects of drought on already stressed vegetation resulting in poor range condition and animal performance. The project discussed in this paper has three broad purposes: first, to compile a profile of Arizona's ranchers, with an emphasis on socioeconomic characteristics of ranchers in the southeastern portion of the state; second, to identify and understand the physical, social, and political-economic factors that ...

Contributors
Conley, Julie, Eakin, Hallie Catherine, Sheridan, Thomas E., et al.
Created Date
1999-09

To prevent unwanted urban sprawl and unregulated development, it is most important that Pima County encourage and retain viable ranches. Ranching is a significant land use that has served to protect our natural open space, and it continues to be an important traditional industry that has shaped the rural landscape.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2000-10

Through the conservation of ranchland in eastern Pima County, the metropolitan urban boundary is better defined, vast landscapes of open space retain their integrity and the heritage and culture of the West is preserved.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2000-09

A companion to the Preliminary Ranch Conservation Element, this report brings together leaders in the area of ranch conservation and compiles their expert writings on ecological and economic sustainability in ranching.

Contributors
Sayre, Nathan F, Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2000-09

Without action by Pima County, Rosemont Ranch would probably either be mined or become a residential subdivision over the next several decades. A ranch conservation scenario offers the best outcome for preventing fragmentation of the landscape and conserving the natural and cultural heritage of the area.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2004-12

To facilitate development of the Environmental Impact Statement which must accompany the Section 10 multi-species conservation proposal, a series of issue papers were prepared. In Pima County, ranching is uniquely able to preserve the integrity of vast tracts of connected and unfragmented open space and wildlife habitat. This study reviews the effect of five alternative permit strategies on the County's ability to preserve unfragmented landscapes through conserving ranch lands.

Contributors
Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
2002-07-31

By including ranch lands as a landscape form worthy of protection and preservation, Pima County formalized its commitment to keep ranchers ranching as a way of achieving multiple community goals, including conserving natural and cultural resources, preserving open spaces, and defining urban form.

Contributors
Mayro, Linda L., Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1999-11

Ranching was and is a distinct American culture with a distinct set of knowledge, values and beliefs. Many of those communities have been weakened by the relentless urbanization of Arizona, but now is the time to create new communities where environmentalists, hunters, birdwatchers and hikers partner with ranchers to preserve and restore the open spaces we all cherish.

Contributors
Sheridan, Thomas E., Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1999

The author takes issue with the statement, "Only three percent of the cows are from the West" and discusses all that is involved in raising cows that are then shipped east to graze before slaughter. They forget that they were born and raised out here. The Altar Valley alone produces millions of pounds of beef a year.

Contributors
Chilton, Susan E., Pima County (Ariz.). County Administrator's Office
Created Date
1999