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Artivate: A Journal of Entrepreneurship in the Arts


The mission of Artivate: A Journal of Entrepreneurship in the Arts is to disseminate new thinking and perspectives on arts entrepreneurship theory, practice, and pedagogy.

The editors are committed to publishing research-based articles and case studies of interest to scholars, artists, and students in the areas of entrepreneurship theory as applied to the arts; arts entrepreneurship education; arts management; arts and creative industries; public policy and the arts; the arts in community and economic development; nonprofit leadership; social entrepreneurship in or using the arts; evaluation and assessment; public practice in the arts.

Artivate is published twice yearly, summer and winter, in an online format. The editors are particularly interested in articles that actively link theory with practice in ways that will be of interest and impact to the broad cross-section of the Journal’s readership. Self-reflective studies from arts entrepreneurs and empirical research from scholars are equally welcome. We are interested in supporting the growth of our nascent discipline and also welcome debut articles from emerging scholars.

Our editorial board is drawn from diverse disciplines at the nexus of entrepreneurship and the arts. These distinguished colleagues review and recommend articles submitted for consideration and we thank them in advance for their hard work and dedication.

Artivate is published by The Pave Program in Arts Entrepreneurship at Arizona State University.

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ARTS ENTREPRENEURSHIP: A CONVERSATION...1 Gary D. Beckman, North Carolina State University; Linda Essig, Arizona State University WHAT’S IN A NAME? TYPIFYING ARTIST ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN COMMUNITY BASED TRAINING...9 Paul Bonin-Rodriguez, University of Texas at Austin THE CASE OF THE PITTSBURGH NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE: AN ILLUSTRATION OF ENTREPRENEURIAL THEORY IN AN ARTISTIC SETTING...25 Jeffrey Nytch, University of Colorado – Boulder SHATTERING THE MYTH OF THE PASSIVE SPECTATOR: ENTREPRENEURIAL EFFORTS TO DEFINE AND ENHANCE PARTICIPATION IN “NON-PARTICIPATORY” ARTS...35 Clayton Lord, Theatre Bay Area

Created Date
2012-09

EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION. . . . . . 52 Gary D. Beckman, North Carolina State University INFUSING ENTREPRENEURSHIP WITHIN NON-BUSINESS DISCIPLINES: PREPARING ARTISTS AND OTHERS FOR SELF-EMPLOYMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP. . . . . . . . . . 53 Joseph S. Roberts, Webster University FRAMEWORKS FOR EDUCATING THE ARTIST OF THE FUTURE: TEACHING HABITS OF MIND FOR ARTS ENTREPRENEURSHIP. . . . .65 Linda Essig, Arizona State University DOSTOEVSKY’S “THE GRAND INQUISITOR”: ADDING AN ETHICAL COMPONENT TO THE TEACHING OF NON-MARKET ENTREPRENEURSHIP. . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Gordon E. Shockley, Arizona State University Peter ...

Created Date
2013-02-16

ARTIVATE: A JOURNAL OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE ARTS Volume 2, Number 3 Summer, 2013 Table of Contents EDITORS’ INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Linda Essig, Arizona State University Gary D. Beckman, North Carolina State University SITUATED CULTURAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP. . . 3 Johan Kolsteeg, Hogeschool voor de Kunsten Utrecht CULTURE COIN: A COMMONS-BASED, COMPLEMENTARY CURRENCY FOR THE ARTS AND ITS IMPACT ON SCARCITY, VIRTUE, ETHICS, AND THE IMAGINATION . . . 14 ...

Created Date
2013-09-02

Editors’ Introduction . . . p. 1 Gary Beckman, North Carolina State University Linda Essig, Arizona State University The “Entrepreneurial Mindset” in Creative and Performing Arts Higher Education in Australia . . . p. 3 Vikki Pollard, Deakin Learning Futures, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia Emily Wilson, Higher Education Office, Northern Melbourne Institute of TAFE, Melbourne, Australia Social Bricolage in Arts Entrepreneurship: Building a Jazz Society from Scratch. . . p. 23 Stephen B. Preece, Wilfrid Laurier University Placemaking and Social Equity: Expanding the Framework of Creative Placemaking . . . p. 35 Debra Webb, Seattle University Book Reviews: Creativity and ...

Created Date
2014-01-20

Editor’s’ Introduction . . . p.1 Joseph Roberts, Webster University Perspectives on Arts Entrepreneurship, Part 1 . . . p. 3 Andrew Taylor, Paul Bonin-Rodriguez, and Linda Essig Creativities, Innovation, And Networks In Garage Punk Rock: A Case Study Of The Eruptörs . . . p. 9 Gareth Dylan Smith and Alex Gillett Creative Toronto: Harnessing The Economic Development Power Of Arts & Culture . . . p. 25 Shoshanah B.D. Goldberg-Miller Book Review Performing Policy: How Contemporary Politics and Cultural Programs Redifined U.S. Artists for the Twenty-First Century (Palgrave) . . . p. 49 by Paul Bonin-Rodriguez Review by ...

Created Date
2015-02-15

The co-editors of Artivate, Gary Beckman and Linda Essig, have shared an interest in advancing arts entrepreneurship as a field of study since Beckman first interviewed Essig as part of his research toward what has become a foundational article (2007) in the field, “”Adventuring” arts entrepreneurship curricula in higher education: An examination of present efforts, obstacles, and best practices.” The current article presents a dialogue between them in which they discuss the nature of the discipline and the challenges and opportunities presented by the launch of Artivate.

Contributors
Beckman, Gary, Essig, Linda
Created Date
2012-08

While many professional arts training programs prepare students to excel at the practice and performance of the arts, evidence suggests that many professional arts training programs may be failing to prepare students to be professional artists. A total of 11.1% of all recent college graduates with undergraduate arts degrees are unemployed (Carnevale, Cheah, & Strohl, 2012, p. 7). Fifty-two percent of arts undergraduate alumni reported being dissatisfied with their institution’s ability to advise them about further career or education opportunities (SNAAP, 2012, p. 14). Eighty-one percent of all arts undergraduate alumni reported having a primary job outside of the arts ...

Contributors
White, Jason
Created Date
2013-09-02
Contributors
Hager, Mark
Created Date
2014-01-20