Phoenix Regional Heat Mitigation, Planning, and Response Research

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This study investigates the impact of photovoltaic canopy shade and tree shade on thermal comfort through meteorological observations and field surveys at a pedestrian mall on Arizona State University’s Tempe campus.

Contributors
ASU

We generated 5-meter resolution SVF maps for two neighborhoods in Phoenix, Arizona to illustrate fine-scale variations of intra-urban horizon limitations due to urban form and vegetation.

Contributors
ASU, University of Kaiserslautern

This established model is applied here to show the relative effects of four common mitigation strategies: increasing the overall (1) emissivity, (2) percentage of vegetated area, (3) thermal conductivity, and (4) albedo of the urban environment in a series of percentage increases by 5, 10, 15, and 20% from baseline values.

Contributors
ASU

Here, 201 surveys were distributed in Metropolitan Phoenix to determine the social impacts of the heat warning system, or more specifically, to gauge risk perception and warning response.

Contributors
ASU, Kent State University

The first objective of this work was to catalyze discussion of the role of personal heat exposure information in research and risk assessment. The second objective was to provide guidance regarding the operationalization of personal heat exposure research methods.

Contributors
ASU, UMass, Virginia Tech, et al.

To investigate the impacts of an energy efficiency retrofit, indoor air quality and resident health were evaluated at a low-income senior housing apartment complex in Phoenix, Arizona, before and after a green energy building renovation.

Contributors
ASU, LBNL, University of Florida

Using National Land Cover Data we analyzed land fragmentation trends from 1992 to 2001 in five southwestern cities associated with Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites.

Contributors
ASU, Kansas State University, University of Georgia, et al.

We have applied a standardized procedure to develop a national database of seasonally and diurnally varying anthropogenic heating profiles for 61 of the largest cities in the United Stated (U.S.).

Contributors
ASU, Portland State University, University of Oklahoma, et al.

The association between a developing urban heat island and local monthly averaged wind speeds is examined in this investigation.

Contributors
ASU

This archives houses peer-reviewed literature, data sets, reports, and other materials generated by ASU researchers that may be informative for local and regional efforts mitigating the adverse impacts of heat. The collection is intended to serve as a resource for students, faculty, and staff collaborating on research initiatives related to heat as well as for community, local, state, and regional partners and other interested parties contributing to heat planning, preparedness, and response activities.