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Phoenix Regional Heat Mitigation, Planning, and Response Research


Date Range
1987 2017

ASU faculty and students share research at Phoenix City Hall regarding urban heat, including causes, consequences, and potential solutions. Video accessible at: https://youtu.be/8B-OkgioQ4E

Contributors
ASU
Created Date
2017-09-29

Presentation by David Sailor, professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning and director of the Urban Climate Research Center at ASU. Sailer's presentation addresses how to define urban heat islands (UHI), and decisions about why and how to measure these complex ecosystems.

Contributors
Sailor, David
Created Date
2017-09-07

Maricopa County, Arizona, anchor to the fastest growing megapolitan area in the United States, is located in a hot desert climate where extreme temperatures are associated with elevated risk of mortality. Continued urbanization in the region will impact atmospheric temperatures and, as a result, potentially affect human health. We aimed to quantify the number of excess deaths attributable to heat in Maricopa County based on three future urbanization and adaptation scenarios and multiple exposure variables. Two scenarios (low and high growth projections) represent the maximum possible uncertainty range associated with urbanization in central Arizona, and a third represents the adaptation ...

Contributors
Hondula, David M., Georgescu, Matei, Balling, Jr., Robert C.
Created Date
2014-04-28

Evaluation of built environment energy demand is necessary in light of global projections of urban expansion. Of particular concern are rapidly expanding urban areas in environments where consumption requirements for cooling are excessive. Here, we simulate urban air conditioning (AC) electric consumption for several extreme heat events during summertime over a semiarid metropolitan area with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to a multilayer building energy scheme. Observed total load values obtained from an electric utility company were split into two parts, one linked to meteorology (i.e., AC consumption) which was compared to WRF simulations, and another to ...

Contributors
Salamanca, F., Georgescu, M., Mahalov, A., et al.
Created Date
2013-08-29

This research evaluates the climatic summertime representation of the diurnal cycle of near-surface temperature using the Weather Research and Forecasting System (WRF) over the rapidly urbanizing and water-vulnerable Phoenix metropolitan area. A suite of monthly, high-resolution (2 km grid spacing) simulations are conducted during the month of July with both a contemporary landscape and a hypothetical presettlement scenario. WRF demonstrates excellent agreement in the representation of the daily to monthly diurnal cycle of near-surface temperatures, including the accurate simulation of maximum daytime temperature timing. Thermal sensitivity to anthropogenic land use and land cover change (LULCC), assessed via replacement of the ...

Contributors
Georgescu, M., Moustaoui, M., Mahalov, A., et al.
Created Date
2011-12-11

Conversion of natural to urban land forms imparts influence on local and regional hydroclimate via modification of the surface energy and water balance, and consideration of such effects due to rapidly expanding megapolitan areas is necessary in light of the growing global share of urban inhabitants. Based on a suite of ensemble-based, multi-year simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, we quantify seasonally varying hydroclimatic impacts of the most rapidly expanding megapolitan area in the US: Arizona's Sun Corridor, centered upon the Greater Phoenix metropolitan area. Using a scenario-based urban expansion approach that accounts for the full range ...

Contributors
Georgescu, M., Mahalov, A., Moustaoui, M.
Created Date
2012-09-07

Background: Extreme heat is a public health challenge. The scarcity of directly comparable studies on the association of heat with morbidity and mortality and the inconsistent identification of threshold temperatures for severe impacts hampers the development of comprehensive strategies aimed at reducing adverse heat-health events. Objectives: This quantitative study was designed to link temperature with mortality and morbidity events in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA, with a focus on the summer season. Methods: Using Poisson regression models that controlled for temporal confounders, we assessed daily temperature–health associations for a suite of mortality and morbidity events, diagnoses, and temperature metrics. Minimum risk ...

Contributors
Pettiti, Diana B., Hondula, David M., Yang, Shuo, et al.
Created Date
2016-02-01

This study seeks to determine the role of land architecture—the composition and configuration of land cover—as well as cadastral–demographic–economic factors on land surface temperature (LST) and the surface urban heat island effect of Phoenix, Arizona. It employs 1 m National Agricultural Imagery Program data of land-cover with 120mLandsat-derived land surface temperature, decomposed to 30 m, a newmeasure of configuration, the normalizedmoment of inertia, and U.S. Census data to address the question for tworandomly selected samples comprising 523 and 545 residential neighborhoods (census blocks) in the city. The results indicate that, contrary to most other studies, land configuration has a stronger ...

Contributors
Li, Xiaoxiao, Li, Wenwen, Middel, Ariane, et al.
Created Date
2015-12-29

This study examines the impact of spatial landscape configuration (e.g., clustered, dispersed) on land-surface temperatures (LST) over Phoenix, Arizona, and Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. We classified detailed land-cover types via object-based image analysis (OBIA) using Geoeye-1 at 3-m resolution (Las Vegas) and QuickBird at 2.4-m resolution (Phoenix). Spatial autocorrelation (local Moran’s I ) was then used to test for spatial dependence and to determine how clustered or dispersed points were arranged. Next, we used Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data acquired over Phoenix (daytime on 10 June and nighttime on 17 October 2011) and Las Vegas (daytime ...

Contributors
Myint, Soe Win, Zheng, Baojuan, Talen, Emily, et al.
Created Date
2015-06-29

The relationship between the characteristics of the urban land system and land surface temperature (LST) has received increasing attention in urban heat island and sustainability research, especially for desert cities. This research generally employs medium or coarser spatial resolution data and primarily focuses on the effects of a few classes of land-cover composition and pattern at the neighborhood or larger level using regression models. This study explores the effects of land system architecture—composition and configuration, both pattern and shape, of fine-grain land-cover classes—on LST of single family residential parcels in the Phoenix, Arizona (southwestern USA) metropolitan area. A 1 m ...

Contributors
Li, Xiaoxiao, Kamarianakis, Yiannis, Ouyang, Yun, et al.
Created Date
2017-02-14

This archives houses peer-reviewed literature, data sets, reports, and other materials generated by ASU researchers that may be informative for local and regional efforts mitigating the adverse impacts of heat. The collection is intended to serve as a resource for students, faculty, and staff collaborating on research initiatives related to heat as well as for community, local, state, and regional partners and other interested parties contributing to heat planning, preparedness, and response activities.