Skip to main content

Mediterranean Landscape Dynamics Project


"Landuse and Landscape Socioecology in the Mediterranean Basin: A Natural Laboratory for the Study of the Long-Term Interaction of Human and Natural Systems."

This international, interdisciplinary research project models the long-term dynamics of human landuse and Mediterranean landscapes. Beginning in Fall 2004, modeling efforts have focued on eastern Spain and western Jordan, encompassing much of the range of environmental variability across the Mediterranean region.

The project examines long-term socioecological processes that shaped Mediterranean landscapes, from the beginning of farming to the beginning of complex civilization.


Contributors
Bergin, Sean M., Ullah, Isaac I. T., Mayer, G. R.
Created Date
2009
Contributors
Ullah, Isaac I. T., Barton, C. Michael, Arizona State University
Created Date
2007

Invited presentation for "Next Generation Simulations of Human-Environmental Interactions" sponsored by the Santa Fe Institute and the University of Arizona, Tucson, 12-14 December, 2005.

Contributors
Sarjoughian, H. S.
Created Date
2005
Contributors
Hill, J. Brett, Miller, Alexandra, Wentz, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2008
Contributors
Miller, Alexandra, Barton, C. Michael, Schmich, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2008
Contributors
Mayer, G. R., Sarjoughian, H. S.
Created Date
2007

Invited paper presented at the Workshop on aspects of Social and Socio-Environmental Dynamics, Arizona State University, January 2007.

Contributors
Sarjoughian, H. S., Barton, C. Michael
Created Date
2007

Hybrid system models - those devised from two or more disparate sub-system models - provide a number of benefits in terms of conceptualization, development, and assessment of dynamical systems. The decomposition approach helps to formulate complex interactions that are otherwise difficult or impractical to express. However, hybrid model de- velopment and usage can introduce complexity that emerges from the composition itself. To improve assurance of model correctness, sub-systems using disparate modeling formalisms must be integrated above and beyond just the data and control level; their composition must have model specification and simulation execution aspects as well. Poly-formalism composition is one …

Contributors
Mayer, G. R.
Created Date
2009-08
Contributors
Barton, C. Michael
Created Date
2008
Contributors
Bergin, Sean M., Ullah, Isaac I. T., Barton, C. Michael, et al.
Created Date
2010
Contributors
Barton, C. Michael, Ullah, Isaac I. T., Mayer, G. R., et al.
Created Date
2010

Microsoft PowerPoint presentation about data management and access issues for the research project, "Land-Use and Landscape Socioecology in the Mediterranean Basin"

Contributors
Barton, C. Michael, Arrowsmith, J. Ramon
Created Date
2005
Contributors
Gundlach, K., Sarjoughian, H. S.
Created Date
2007

Dramatic changes in land use were associated with the rise of agriculture in the mid Holocene in the Mediterranean region. Both the surface properties and the drainage networks were changed. Along with the direct modifications to surface properties (vegetation removal and change, sediment liberation and compaction) and consequent drainage alteration (terracing, canals), up and downstream responses in the watersheds communicated these changes throughout the landscape. The magnitude, rate, and feedbacks with the growing human populations are critical questions in our effort to assess human-landscape interactions. To investigate these relationships, recent field work in the Penaguila Valley in southeast Spain included …

Contributors
DiMaggio, E. N., La Rocca, N., Arrowsmith, J. Ramon, et al.

The static, fragmentary archaeological record requires us to construct models of the human past. Traditionally, these have been narratives that make compelling stories but are difficult to evaluate. Recent advances in geospatial and agent-based modeling technology offers the potential to create quantitative models of human systems, but also challenge us to conceive of human societies in ways that can be expressed in algorithmic form. Besides making our own explanations more robust, integrating such quantitative modeling into archaeological practice can produce more useful accounts of human systems and their long-term dynamics for other disciplines and policy makers.

Contributors
Barton, C. Michael
Created Date
2009

Poster presented at the American Geophysical Union 2006, San Francisco.

Contributors
DiMaggio, E. N., Arrowsmith, J. Ramon, Barton, C. Michael, et al.
Contributors
Bergin, Sean M., Ullah, Isaac I. T., Barton, C. Michael, et al.
Created Date
2012