Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Access control is one of the most fundamental security mechanisms used in the design and management of modern information systems. However, there still exists an open question on how formal access control models can be automatically analyzed and fully realized in secure system development. Furthermore, specifying and managing access control policies are often error-prone due to the lack of effective analysis mechanisms and tools. In this dissertation, I present an Assurance Management Framework (AMF) that is designed to cope with various assurance management requirements from both access control system development and policy-based computing. On one hand, the AMF framework facilitates …

Contributors
Hu, Hongxin, Ahn, Gail-Joon, Yau, Stephen S., et al.
Created Date
2012

Most existing security decisions for both defending and attacking are made based on some deterministic approaches that only give binary answers. Even though these approaches can achieve low false positive rate for decision making, they have high false negative rates due to the lack of accommodations to new attack methods and defense techniques. In this dissertation, I study how to discover and use patterns with uncertainty and randomness to counter security challenges. By extracting and modeling patterns in security events, I am able to handle previously unknown security events with quantified confidence, rather than simply making binary decisions. In particular, …

Contributors
Zhao, Ziming, Ahn, Gail-Joon, Yau, Stephen S., et al.
Created Date
2014

Users often join an online social networking (OSN) site, like Facebook, to remain social, by either staying connected with friends or expanding social networks. On an OSN site, users generally share variety of personal information which is often expected to be visible to their friends, but sometimes vulnerable to unwarranted access from others. The recent study suggests that many personal attributes, including religious and political affiliations, sexual orientation, relationship status, age, and gender, are predictable using users' personal data from an OSN site. The majority of users want to remain socially active, and protect their personal data at the same …

Contributors
Gundecha, Pritam Sureshlal, Liu, Huan, Ahn, Gail-Joon, et al.
Created Date
2015

Mobile devices are penetrating everyday life. According to a recent Cisco report [10], the number of mobile connected devices such as smartphones, tablets, laptops, eReaders, and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) modules will hit 11.6 billion by 2021, exceeding the world's projected population at that time (7.8 billion). The rapid development of mobile devices has brought a number of emerging security and privacy issues in mobile computing. This dissertation aims to address a number of challenging security and privacy issues in mobile computing. This dissertation makes fivefold contributions. The first and second parts study the security and privacy issues in Device-to-Device communications. Specifically, …

Contributors
Sun, Jingchao, Zhang, Yanchao, Zhang, Junshan, et al.
Created Date
2017