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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




The current paper presents two studies that examine how asymmetries during interpersonal coordination are compensated for. It was predicted that destabilizing effects of asymmetries are stabilized through the recruitment and suppression of motor degrees-of-freedom (df). Experiment 1 examined this effect by having participants coordinate line movements of different orientations. Greater differences in asymmetries between participants yielded greater spatial deviation, resulting in the recruitment of df. Experiment 2 examined whether coordination of movements asymmetrical in shape (circle and line) yield simultaneous recruitment and suppression of df. This experiment also tested whether the initial stability of the performed movement alters the amount …

Contributors
Fine, Justin Michael, Amazeen, Eric L, Amazeen, Polemnia G, et al.
Created Date
2013

Perceived heaviness of lifted objects has been shown to scale to a ratio of muscle activity and movement during elbow lifts. This scaling reflects the importance of the forces applied to an object and the resulting kinematics for this perception. The current study determined whether these perceived heaviness dynamics are similar in other lifting conditions. Anatomically sourced context-conditioned variability has implications for motor control. The current study investigated whether these implications also hold for heaviness perception. In two experiments participants lifted objects with knee extension lifts and with several arm lifts and reported perceived heaviness. The resulting psychophysiological functions revealed …

Contributors
Waddell, Morgan Leigh, Amazeen, Eric L, Amazeen, Polemnia G, et al.
Created Date
2016

Fractal analyses examine variability in a time series to look for temporal structure or pattern that reveals the underlying processes of a complex system. Although fractal property has been found in many signals in biological systems, how it relates to behavioral performance and what it implies about the complex system under scrutiny are still open questions. In this series of experiments, fractal property, movement kinematics, and behavioral performance were measured on participants performing a reciprocal tapping task. In Experiment 1, the results indicated that the alpha value from detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) reflected deteriorating performance when visual feedback delay was …

Contributors
Nguyen, Tri Duc, Amazeen, Eric L, Glenberg, Arthur M, et al.
Created Date
2019

For many years now, researchers have documented evidence of fractal scaling in psychological time series. Explanations of fractal scaling have come from many sources but those that have gained the most traction in the literature are theories that suggest fractal scaling originates from the interactions among the multiple scales that make up behavior. Those theories, originating in the study of dynamical systems, suffer from the limitation that fractal analysis reveals only indirect evidence of multiscale interactions. Multiscale interactions must be demonstrated directly because there are many means to generate fractal properties. In two experiments, participants performed a pursuit tracking task …

Contributors
Likens, Aaron, Amazeen, Polemnia G, Amazeen, Eric L, et al.
Created Date
2016

Auditory scene analysis (ASA) is the process through which listeners parse and organize their acoustic environment into relevant auditory objects. ASA functions by exploiting natural regularities in the structure of auditory information. The current study investigates spectral envelope and its contribution to the perception of changes in pitch and loudness. Experiment 1 constructs a perceptual continuum of twelve f0- and intensity-matched vowel phonemes (i.e. a pure timbre manipulation) and reveals spectral envelope as a primary organizational dimension. The extremes of this dimension are i (as in “bee”) and Ʌ (“bun”). Experiment 2 measures the strength of the relationship between produced …

Contributors
Patten, Kristopher Jakob, McBeath, Michael K, Amazeen, Eric L, et al.
Created Date
2017

This study explores the psychophysical and neural processes associated with the perception of sounds as either pleasant or aversive. The underlying psychophysical theory is based on auditory scene analysis, the process through which listeners parse auditory signals into individual acoustic sources. The first experiment tests and confirms that a self-rated pleasantness continuum reliably exists for 20 various stimuli (r = .48). In addition, the pleasantness continuum correlated with the physical acoustic characteristics of consonance/dissonance (r = .78), which can facilitate auditory parsing processes. The second experiment uses an fMRI block design to test blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) changes elicited …

Contributors
Patten, Kristopher Jakob, McBeath, Michael K, Baxter, Leslie C, et al.
Created Date
2014

Motor-respiratory coordination is the synchronization of movement and breathing during exercise. The relation between movement and breathing can be described using relative phase, a measure of the location in the movement cycle relative to the location in the breathing cycle. Stability in that relative phase relation has been identified as important for aerobic efficiency. However, performance can be overly attracted to stable relative phases, preventing the performance or learning of more complex patterns. Little research exists on relative phase dynamics in motor-respiratory coordination, although those observations underscore the importance of learning more. In contrast, there is an extensive literature on …

Contributors
Hessler, Eric Edward, Amazeen, Polemnia G, Amazeen, Eric L, et al.
Created Date
2010