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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2020


The glycation of plasma proteins leading to the production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and subsequent damage is a driving factor in the pathophysiology of diabetic complications. The overall research objective was to elucidate the mechanisms by which birds prevent protein glycation in the presence of naturally high plasma glucose concentrations. This was accomplished through the specific purpose of examining the impact of temperature and glucose concentration on the percent glycation of chicken serum albumin (CSA) in comparison to human serum albumin (HSA). Purified CSA and HSA solutions prepared at four different glucose concentrations (0 mM, 5.56 mM, 11.11 …

Contributors
Zuck, Jessica Ann, Sweazea, Karen, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2016

Background: Smartphone diet tracking applications (apps) are increasing in popularity but may not adequately address the important concerns of proper intake and of diet quality. Two novel weight loss apps were designed based on the popular dietary frameworks: MyPlate and FoodLists. MyPlate, the dietary guidelines put forth by the U.S. government, encourages a balanced diet from five primary food groups, but does not specify intake limits. The Food Lists set upper intake limits on all food groups except vegetables, and these guidelines extend to include fats, sweets, and alcohol. Objective: The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine …

Contributors
Scholtz, Cameron, Johnston, Carol, Mayol-Kreiser, Sandra, et al.
Created Date
2016

Currently, there has been limited research on evaluating the social media use and competency level of registered dietitian/nutritionists (RD/N). With health information increasingly sought on social media, it is imperative to understand the social media competency of health professionals. The social media use, reach, and competency level of a nationwide RD/N sample was assessed utilizing an online survey. The sample (n=500) while mostly female (97%) was representative of RD/Ns compared to the nationwide statistics from the Commission on Dietetic Registration. The sample included RD/Ns from forty-six states with California (n=44), New York (n=42), and Texas (n=34) having the largest proportion …

Contributors
Thompson-Felty, Claudia, Johnston, Carol, Swan, Pamela, et al.
Created Date
2017

ABSTRACT Epidemiological studies have suggested a link between nut consumption and weight. The possible effects of regular nut consumption as a method of weight loss has shown minimal results with 2-3 servings of nut products per day. This 8 week study sought to investigate the effect of more modest nut consumption (1 oz./day, 5 days/week) on dietary compensation in healthy overweight individuals. Overweight and obese participants (n = 28) were recruited from the local community and were randomly assigned to either almond (NUT) or control (CON) group in this randomized, parallel-arm study. Subjects were instructed to eat their respective foods …

Contributors
Jahns, Marshall, Johnston, Carol, Hall, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2011

Nut consumption, specifically almonds, have been shown to help maintain weight and influence disease risk factors in adult populations. Limited studies have been conducted examining the effect of a small dose of almonds on energy intake and body weight. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of pre-meal almond consumption on energy intake and weight in overweight and obese adults. In this study included 21, overweight or obese, participants who were considered healthy or had a controlled disease state. This 8-week parallel arm study, participants were randomized to consume an isocaloric amount of almonds, (1 oz) serving, …

Contributors
Mcbride, Lindsey Ann, Johnston, Carol, Swan, Pamela, et al.
Created Date
2011

In October, 2009, participants of the Arizona Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) began receiving monthly Cash Value Vouchers (CVV) worth between six and 10 dollars towards the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables. Data from the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) showed CVV redemption rates in the first two years of the program were lower than the national average of 77% redemption. In response, the ADHS WIC Food List was expanded to also include canned and frozen fruits and vegetables. More recent data from ADHS suggest that redemption rates are improving, but variably exist …

Contributors
Bertmann, Farryl Mw, Wharton, Christopher, Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam, et al.
Created Date
2013

In 2002, a scientifically derived food guide pyramid for vegetarians, the Modified Food Guide for Lacto-ovo-vegetarians and Vegans was published and well received. Now that 10 years have passed, new scientific literature regarding the bioavailability of the nutrients of key concern in vegetarian diets has been published, and the graphical format of the nation's food guide has evolved from a pyramid shape into a circular plate. The objective of this research was to examine the post-2002 literature regarding the bioavailability of key nutrients in vegetarian diets; to use this information to update the recommendations made in the 2002 Modified Food …

Contributors
Fladell, Lauren, Johnston, Carol, Vaughan, Linda, et al.
Created Date
2013

Vitamin B12, found only in animal products, is a water-soluble vitamin important for DNA methylation, purine and pyrimidine synthesis, and the myelination of nerves. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include anemia, gait disturbances, altered vibration proprioception, impaired vision, psychosis, depression, dementia-like illness, and ultimately death. Because vegetarians and vegans consume fewer animal products in their diet than omnivores, they are inherently more at risk for developing these symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the correlation between nervous system markers (balance, dexterity, and vibration sensitivity) and markers of vitamin B12 nutriture (serum B12 …

Contributors
Arnold, Taylor Ann, Johnston, Carol, Whisner, Corrie, et al.
Created Date
2016

Background: Previous research suggests a healthy eater schema (i.e., identifying yourself as a healthy eater) may be a useful concept to target in interventions. A "stealth" intervention that discussed the moral issues related to food worked better at promoting healthful eating than an intervention focused on the health benefits. No research has explored the relationship between moral foundations, a theoretical model focused on delineating core "foundations" for making a moral decision, and healthy eater self-identity or self-efficacy. Purpose: We explored the relationship between moral foundations (i.e., harm/care, fairness/reciprocity, in-group/loyalty, authority/respect, & purity/sanctity) and health eater self-identity and fruit and vegetable …

Contributors
Kiser, Sarah, Hekler, Eric B, Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam, et al.
Created Date
2013

Dietary protein is known to increase postprandial thermogenesis more so than carbohydrates or fats, probably related to the fact that amino acids have no immediate form of storage in the body and can become toxic if not readily incorporated into body tissues or excreted. It is also well documented that subjects report greater satiety on high- versus low-protein diets and that subject compliance tends to be greater on high-protein diets, thus contributing to their popularity. What is not as well known is how a high-protein diet affects resting metabolic rate over time, and what is even less well known is …

Contributors
Moore, Amy, Johnston, Carol, Appel, Christy, et al.
Created Date
2012

Birds have plasma glucose levels that are 1.5-2 times greater than mammals of similar body mass in addition to higher free fatty acid concentrations, both of which would typically impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation if observed in mammals. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be stimulated in mammals through the use of acetylcholine (ACh), which primarily acts through nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated pathways, with varying reliance on endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs). Very few studies have been conducted on small resistance systemic arteries from birds. The hypothesis was that because birds have naturally high glucose and free fatty acid concentrations, ACh-induced vasodilation of isolated …

Contributors
Jarrett, Catherine Lee, Sweazea, Karen L, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2012

Many people with or at risk for diabetes have difficulty maintaining normal postprandial blood glucose levels (120-140 mg/dl). Research has shown that vinegar decreases postprandial glycemia. The purpose of this study was to examine a possible mechanism by which vinegar decreases postprandial glycemia, particularly the effect of vinegar ingestion on gut fermentation. In this parallel arm randomized control trial, the effects of daily ingestion of vinegar on gut fermentation markers were observed among adults at risk for type 2 diabetes in Phoenix, Arizona. Subjects (n=14) were randomly assigned to treatments consisting of a vinegar drink (1.5g acetic acid) or a …

Contributors
White, Serena Elsa, Johnston, Carol, Appel, Christy, et al.
Created Date
2013

Background: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics states that it is possible for a vegetarian to obtain the recommended amount of nutrients with a properly planned diet but nutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12 deficiency, may occur if diet planning is not optimal. An early indicator of B12 deficiency is raised homocysteine concentrations in blood which can cause health issues. Objective: The amino acid methionine is consumed via dietary protein. Methionine is used in the biosynthesis of other proteins. After a removal of a methyl group, it makes homocysteine. Slightly raised homocysteine may promote greater synthesis of glutathione, an important …

Contributors
Manley, Rachel Christine, Johnston, Carol, Levinson, Simin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Background. Despite research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of essential hypertension, instances of this condition continue to rise. Recent findings indicate that the administration of dietary nitrates, in the form of beetroot juice and other nitrate-rich vegetables, may offer anti-hypertensive effects in various study populations. Objective. This randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial sought to compare the effects of high-nitrate vegetable salads to the effects of low-nitrate canned vegetables on plasma nitrate/nitrite concentration, peripheral and central-aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressures, pulse wave velocity, and flow-mediated dilation. Methods. Healthy, post-menopausal women (n=5; 80% Caucasian; 52.6 ± 5.7 years) with mildly elevated blood …

Contributors
Mayra, Selicia, Sweazea, Karen, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2017

The purpose of this study was to gather qualitative data on different and novel methods used to self-monitor diet and exercise during a weight loss study. Participants who used either a traditional paper and pencil method or a smart phone weight loss app for diet and exercise tracking were recruited for focus groups. Focus group discussions centered on the liked and disliked aspects of recording, perceived behavior changes, and suggestions for improved self-monitoring. Focus groups were organized based on the method of self-monitoring. The app group tracked calorie intake and expenditure via the "Lose It" app on their smart phones. …

Contributors
Sterner, Danielle, Wharton, Christopher, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2012

Determining the factors associated with the availability of healthy and unhealthy foods in the household may help in understanding the varying complexities that contribute to obesity among children and help design interventions to impact children's food consumption behaviors. This study examined factors that are associated with the availability of healthy and unhealthy foods in children's home food environments (HFE). Data was collected from a random-digit-dial telephone survey of 1708 households, with at least one child between 3-18 years of age, located in five low-income New Jersey cities. HFE was assessed based on responses to a set of six items that …

Contributors
Berry, Andrea I., Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2012

Background: Acetic acid in vinegar has demonstrated antiglycemic effects in previous studies; however, the mechanism is unknown. Objective: To determine whether acetic acid dissociates in the addition of sodium chloride and describe a flavorful vinaigrette that maintains the functional properties of acetic acid. Design: Phase I - Ten healthy subjects (23-40 years) taste tested five homemade vinaigrette and five commercial dressings. Perceived saltiness, sweetness, tartness, and overall tasted were scored using a modified labeled affective magnitude scale. Each dressing was tested three times for pH with a calibrated meter. Phase II – Randomized crossover trial testing six dressings against a …

Contributors
Bonsall, Amber Kaila, Johnston, Carol, Mayol-Kreiser, Sandra, et al.
Created Date
2017

Diet quality is closely intertwined with overall health status and deserves close examination. Healthcare providers are stretched thin in the current stressed system and would benefit from a validated tool for rapid assessment of diet quality. The Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Participants Short Version (REAP-S) represents one such option. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the REAP-S and Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) for scoring the diet quality of omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan diets. Eighty-one healthy male and female subjects with an average age of 30.9 years completed the REAP-S as well …

Contributors
Bliss, Courtney, Johnston, Carol, Tasevska, Natasha, et al.
Created Date
2015

Vegetarian diets can provide an abundance of nutrients when planned with care. However, research suggests that vegetarian diets may have lower protein quality than omnivore diets. Current protein recommendations assume that vegetarians obtain a majority of their protein from animal products, like dairy and eggs. Studies have shown that this assumption may not be valid. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) may not be adequate in vegetarian populations with high protein requirements. The purpose of this study is to analyze dietary protein quality using the DIAAS (Digestible Indispensable Amino Acid Score) method in both vegetarian and omnivore endurance athletes. 38 omnivores …

Contributors
Zuelke, Corinne, Johnston, Carol, Wharton, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2017

The body is capable of regulating hunger in several ways. Some of these hunger regulation methods are innate, such as genetics, and some, such as the responses to stress and to the smell of food, are innate but can be affected by body conditions such as BMI and physical activity. Further, some hunger regulation methods stem from learned behaviors originating from cultural pressures or parenting styles. These latter regulation methods for hunger can be grouped into the categories: emotion, environment, and physical. The factors that regulate hunger can also influence the incidence of disordered eating, such as eating in the …

Contributors
Goett, Taylor, Johnston, Carol, Lee, Chong, et al.
Created Date
2013

There are limited studies exploring the direct relationship between coconut oil and cholesterol concentrations. Research in animals and a few intervention trials suggest that coconut oil increases the good cholesterol (high density lipoprotein, HDL) and thus reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Preliminary research at Arizona State University (ASU) has found similar results using coconut oil as a placebo, positive changes in HDL cholesterol concentrations were observed. The goal of this randomized, double blind, parallel two arm study, was to further examine the beneficial effects of a 2g supplement of coconut oil taken each day for 8 weeks on cholesterol …

Contributors
Shedden, Rachel Nikita, Johnston, Carol, Lespron, Christy, et al.
Created Date
2017

Long term high fat diets (HFD) are correlated with the development of diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short term high fat intake on the etiology of kidney disease has not been well-studied. Therefore, this study examined the impact of a six week HFD (60% fat) on kidney structure and function in young male Sprague-Dawley rats. Previous studies have shown that these animals develop indices of diabetes compared to rats fed a standard rodent chow (5% fat) for six weeks. The hypothesis of this study is that six weeks of HFD will lead to early stages of kidney …

Contributors
Crinigan, Catherine, Sweazea, Karen, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2015

Background. Research suggests that non-O blood types are at an increased risk of thrombosis and related health complications in cardiovascular disease (CVD). This is due in part to higher concentrations of von Willebrand factor (VWF), an important factor involved in blood clotting. Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a vegetarian-like diet on blood coagulation and other health parameters in adults with type A blood compared to type O blood over a four week intervention. Given the lack of previous research on blood type and diet, it was hypothesized that no difference in blood coagulation …

Contributors
Brown, Jennifer Marie, Johnston, Carol, Martin, Keith, et al.
Created Date
2013

Curcumin is an active ingredient of Curcuma longa (Turmeric) and is studied extensively for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of turmeric on blood glucose and plasma insulin levels. The study utilized a placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over design with participants serving as their own control. Eight glucose tolerant healthy participants completed the full study. Three-weeks washout period was kept in between six-weeks. Prior to the test meal day, participants were asked to eat a bagel with their evening dinner. During the day of the test meal, participants reported to …

Contributors
Oza, Namrata, Johnston, Carol, Mayol-Kreiser, Sandra, et al.
Created Date
2017

There are several visual dimensions of food that can affect food intake, example portion size, color, and variety. This dissertation elucidates the effect of number of pieces of food on preference and amount of food consumed in humans and motivation for food in animals. Chapter 2 Experiment 1 showed that rats preferred and also ran faster for multiple pieces (30, 10 mg pellets) than an equicaloric, single piece of food (300 mg) showing that multiple pieces of food are more rewarding than a single piece. Chapter 2 Experiment 2 showed that rats preferred a 30-pellet food portion clustered together rather …

Contributors
Bajaj, Devina, Phillips, Elizabeth D, Cohen, Adam, et al.
Created Date
2013

ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the effect a daily coconut oil supplement (2 grams) would have on a common serum marker of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein) and an indicator of oxidative stress (TBARS) when compared to the control group receiving a placebo capsule (white flour) in healthy, sedentary adults between the ages of 18-40 in Phoenix, Arizona. Design: This study was designed as secondary analyses of blood samples originally collected to study the effects of coconut oil supplementation on blood lipids and body composition. The original study consisted of 32 healthy, adult volunteers …

Contributors
Norman, Lisa Marie, Johnston, Carol, Shepard, Christina, et al.
Created Date
2017

Background: Effective glucose management using exercise modalities in older patients with type 2 diabetes and activities of daily living (ADL) disabilities are unknown. Purpose: The study investigated the acute effects of motor-assisted cycling and functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling on the 2-h postprandial glucose responses compared with sitting control in older adults with type 2 diabetes and ADL disabilities. Methods: The study used a 3×3 crossover study design. Nine participants were randomly assigned to one of the three treatment sequences: ABC, BCA, and CAB. (A, motor-assisted cycling; B, FES cycling; C, sitting control). Linear mixed models (LMM) with Bonferroni post-hoc …

Contributors
ma, tongyu, Lee, Chong, Hooker, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2019

Urinary sucrose and fructose has been suggested as a predictive biomarker of total sugars intake based on research involving UK adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between total sugars consumption and 24-hour urinary sucrose and fructose (24uSF) in US adult population and to investigate the effect of physical activity on this association. Fifty seven free-living healthy subjects 20 to 68 years old, participated in a 15-day highly controlled feeding study, consuming their habitual diet, provided by the research metabolic kitchen. Dietary sugars were estimated using Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR). Subjects collected eight 24-hour …

Contributors
Mohan, Chitra, Tasevska, Natasha, Ainsworth, Barbara, et al.
Created Date
2019

ABSTRACT This randomized, controlled, double-blind crossover study examined the effects of a preprandial, 20g oral dose of apple cider vinegar (ACV) on colonic fermentation and glycemia in a normal population, with the ultimate intention of identifying the mechanisms by which vinegar has been shown to reduce postprandial glycemia and insulinemia. Fifteen male and female subjects were recruited, ages 20-60y, who had no prior history of gastrointestinal (GI) disease or resections impacting normal GI function, were non-smokers, were non-vegetarian/vegan, were not taking any medications known to alter (glucose) metabolism, and were free of chronic disease including diabetes. Subjects were instructed to …

Contributors
Medved, Emily, Johnston, Carol, Sweazea, Karen, et al.
Created Date
2012

Pediatric obesity is a continuing concern in the United States. Preventative intervention methods in the form of nutrition education, including hands-on cooking lessons may improve personal choices for healthy eating. This study assessed the effectiveness of Arizona State University’s Camp CRAVE, a one-week course promoting healthy eating and teaching basic cooking skills. Children ages 9-13years (mean 10.3years, n=31) participated in a pre- and post-test survey to assess if the one-week course would increase self-efficacy to cook at home and increase knowledge of nutrition. The course showed significant increase in the participants’ nutrition knowledge and preference for healthier food options. There …

Contributors
Bell, Kelly Marie, Johnston, Carol, Shepard, Christina, et al.
Created Date
2017

ABSTRACT This study evaluated the LoseIt Smart Phone app by Fit Now Inc. for nutritional quality among users during an 8 week behavioral modification weight loss protocol. All participants owned smart phones and were cluster randomized to either a control group using paper and pencil record keeping, a memo group using a memo function on their smart phones, or the LoseIt app group which was composed of the participants who owned iPhones. Thirty one participants completed the study protocol: 10 participants from the LoseIt app group, 10 participants from the memo group, and 11 participants from the paper and pencil …

Contributors
Cowan, David Kevin, Johnston, Carol, Wharton, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2011

Birds have shown promise as models of diabetes due to health and longevity despite naturally high plasma glucose concentrations, a condition which in diabetic humans leads to protein glycation and various complications. Research into mechanisms that protect birds from high plasma glucose have shown that some species of birds have naturally low levels of protein glycation. Some hypothesize a diet rich in carotenoids and other antioxidants protects birds from protein glycation and oxidative damage. There is little research, however, into the amount of protein glycation in birds of prey, which consume a high protein, high fat diet. No studies have …

Contributors
Ingram, Tana Dawn, Sweazea, Karen, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2017

Background: Individuals in the general populations with a known gluten disorder is believed to be 6% and it is unclear why the gluten free diet (GFD) has risen sharply (28%) in recent years. However, science has revealed that gluten can cause colonic changes in those undiagnosed with a known gluten disorder. The ramifications of these changes are unknown. Three common ingredients found in gluten free products, such as pasta, are corn quinoa and rice. Evidence from the scientific literature has shown that corn and quinoa can produce more colonic hydrogen than refined wheat and rice, indicating that corn and quinoa …

Contributors
Snyder, Darren Lawrence, Johnston, Carol, Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam, et al.
Created Date
2015

Epidemiological studies have identified obesity as a risk factor for numerous chronic diseases such as adult onset diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. In both humans and laboratory animals, high-fat diets have been shown to cause obesity. Increases in dietary fat lead to increased energy consumption and, consequently, significant increases in body fat content. CD36 has been implicated in fat perception, preference, and increased consumption, but it is yet to be tested using a behavior paradigm. To study the effect of CD36 on fat taste transmission and fat consumption, four CD36 knockout (experimental) mice and four Black 6 wildtype (control) mice underwent …

Contributors
Jasbi, Paniz, Johnston, Carol, Lespron, Christy, et al.
Created Date
2018

The omega-3 fatty acids in fatty fish and fish oil, eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA), have been associated with a reduction in risk for cardiovascular disease. Blood type is a known contributor to risk for cardiovascular events. This study evaluated the effect of fish oil supplements on cardiovascular risk markers in adults with blood types A or O. An 8-week parallel-arm, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted in healthy adult men and women with either blood type A (BTA) or blood type O (BTO). Participants were randomized to receive fish oil supplements (n=10 [3 BTA/7 BTO]; 2 g [containing …

Contributors
Herring, Dana, Johnston, Carol, Vega-López, Sonia, et al.
Created Date
2014

Background: Research in animal models suggests that fish oil ingestion may impair immunity and increase risk for infection. To date there are no studies examining this relationship between fish oil ingestion and risk for infection in humans. Objective: The primary aim of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-arm study was to examine the effect of 400 mg of EPA and 200 mg of DHA, the main components of fish oil (FO) supplements, on the incidence of symptoms related to upper respiratory tract infections in healthy young females, at a large southwestern university. Design: Healthy young women between 18 and 38 years …

Contributors
Gutierrez, Megan, Johnston, Carol, Appel, Christy, et al.
Created Date
2013

This study was designed to influence consumer habits, specifically those relating to purchases of fruits, vegetables, and junk food. Previous studies have clearly shown the ineffectiveness of simply describing the health benefits of eating more fruits and vegetables (F/V). In contrast, this study aimed to change the result by changing the message: providing participants with insight into the hidden agendas of food companies and grocery stores, provide useful tips on how to include children when selecting F/V, and emphasizing the importance of parental modeling in regard to food purchases. Participants of this study were separated into two groups, the tour …

Contributors
Kinsfather, Diana Llelven, Johnston, Carol, Hekler, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2013

Despite recent strides for awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension, prevalence remains high with estimates suggesting one third of Americans have hypertension. The hypotensive effects of potassium and magnesium have been known and administered in a clinical setting for nearly a century. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of taking a potassium/magnesium supplement to help reduce blood pressure in individuals with mildly-moderately elevated blood pressure. In this randomized, controlled crossover trial, potassium and magnesium supplementation was explored among healthy adults with mildly elevated blood pressure in Phoenix, Arizona. Subjects (n = 12) were randomly assigned to …

Contributors
Pawloski, Jason Richard, Johnston, Carol, Vega-Lopez, Sonia, et al.
Created Date
2015

Chronic diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer are leading causes of death in the United States. Although they result from a host of personal and environmental factors, diet remains a critical way to reduce the risk. Plant-based diets in particular are associated with reduction in risk for chronic disease due to an intake that closely mirrors the Dietary Guidelines for fruit and vegetable consumption, fiber, and fat intake. Additionally, plant-based diets offer a sustainable alternative in relation to food production as they often require fewer natural resources overall. While there are many benefits to following a plant-based diet, …

Contributors
Incollingo, April, Wharton, Christopher, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2020

The unpleasant bitter taste found in many nutritious vegetables may deter people from consuming a healthy diet. We investigated individual differences in taste perception and whether these differences influence the effectiveness of bitterness masking. To test whether phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) `supertasters' also taste salt and sugar with greater intensity, as suggested by Bartoshuk and colleagues (2004), we infused strips of paper with salt water or sugar water. The bitterness rating of the PTC strip had a significant positive linear relationship with ratings of both the intensity of sweet and salt, but the effect sizes were very low, suggesting that the PTC …

Contributors
Wilkie, Lynn Melissa, Phillips, Elizabeth D, Cohen, Adam, et al.
Created Date
2012

The unpleasant bitter taste found in many nutritious vegetables may deter their consumption. While bitterness suppression by prototypical tastants is well-studied in the chemical and pharmacological fields, mechanisms to reduce the bitterness of foods such as vegetables remain to be elucidated. Here tastants representing the taste primaries of salty and sweet were investigated as potential bitterness suppressors of three types of Brassicaceae vegetables. The secondary aim of these studies was to determine whether the bitter masking agents were differentially effective for bitter-sensitive and bitter-insensitive individuals. In all experiments, participants rated vegetables plain and with the addition of tastants. In Experiments …

Contributors
Wilkie, Lynn Melissa, Capaldi Phillips, Elizabeth D, Cohen, Adam, et al.
Created Date
2014

Dietary counseling from a registered dietitian has been shown in previous studies to aid in weight loss for those receiving counseling. With the increasing use of smartphone diet/weight loss applications (app), this study sought to investigate if an iPhone diet app providing feedback from a registered dietitian improved weight loss and bio-markers of health. Twenty-four healthy adults who owned iPhones (BMI > 24 kg/m2) completed this trial. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three app groups: the MyDietitian app with daily feedback from a registered dietitian (n=7), the MyDietitian app without feedback (n=7), and the MyPlate feedback control app …

Contributors
Thompson-Felty, Claudia, Johnston, Carol, Wharton, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2014

The effects of iron and chromium blood concentrations have been linked to blood glucose control in diabetics. It is suggested that iron causes oxidative stress in the beta cells of the pancreas and adipocytes creating insulin insufficiency and resistance. Chromium is believed to increase the action of insulin through its biologically active molecule chromodulin. Both of these mechanisms are not clear. This 20 week case study tests the feasibility of combining iron depletion therapy followed by chromium supplementation to improve insulin sensitivity. This single case study followed a protocol of two blood donations separated by eight weeks followed by chromium …

Contributors
Jarrett, Nia M., Johnston, Carol, Lespron, Christy, et al.
Created Date
2015

Drinking vinegar is a popularly discussed remedy for relieving heartburn symptom, as can be read on many websites; however, there has been no scientific research or theory to support its efficacy. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over research study tested the efficacy of the organic apple cider vinegar, with mother, on alleviation of the heartburn symptom related to Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). A minimum of one week separated the four trial arms: chili (placebo), antacid after chili meal (positive control), vinegar added to chili, and diluted vinegar after chili meal. Twenty grams of vinegar were used in both vinegar treatments, and …

Contributors
Yeh, Zoe, Johnston, Carol, Mayol-Kreiser, Sandra, et al.
Created Date
2016

ABSTRACT Many natural interventions have been effective at lowering postprandial glucose concentrations (PPG) in research trials and, theoretically, should have favorable effects on the prevention and management of T2DM. Natural interventions include vinegar, nuts and exercise. Green tea has been demonstrated to also possessing antiglycemic effects. Thus, green tea, and its most abundant catechin EGCG, are being consumed for its potential health benefits in cancer prevention and in its inhibitory effects on α-amylase. Many studies have found EGCG to inhibit α-amylase an enzyme needed in the breakdown of carbohydrates (CHO). Other studies have looked at EGCG and its potential for …

Contributors
Romash, Roni Genna, Johnston, Carol, Dixon, Kathleen, et al.
Created Date
2018

Sustainability, as it relates to nutrition, affects all aspects of food from systems-level production to consumption. Viability of local food systems in the southwest of the United States has been largely understudied. In order to address this gap in the literature, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 farmers in Arizona and New Mexico to determine best practices, challenges and barriers to farming. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes. Many trends were consistent with those reported elsewhere in the US, but the importance of water emerged, a unique need not explicitly noted in other regional studies. Vegetarian diets are …

Contributors
Lynch, Heidi, Wharton, Christopher M, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2017

Healthy lifestyle behaviors including quality nutrition have been shown to successfully prevent chronic disease or minimize symptoms. However, many physicians lack the knowledge and skills to provide adequate nutrition counseling and education for their patients. A major component of this problem is that medical schools are not required to teach nutrition education. The purpose of this feasibility study was to compare the changes in the perceived importance of nutrition in the medical field in medical students before and after participating in a week-long interactive nutrition course in order to determine if a week-long course can positively influence students’ perceptions of …

Contributors
Baum, Makenna, Johnston, Carol, Levinson, Simin, et al.
Created Date
2020

Objective: The purpose of this randomized parallel arm trial was to demonstrate the effects of daily fish oil supplementation (600mg per day for eight weeks) on body composition and body mass in young healthy women, aged 18-38, at a large southwestern university. Design: 26 non-obese (mean BMI 23.7±0.6 kg/m2), healthy women (18-38y; mean, 23.5±1.1 y) from a southwestern Arizona university campus community completed the study. Subjects were healthy, non-smokers, consuming less than 3.5 oz of fish per week according to self-report. Participants were randomized to one of two groups: FISH (600 mg omega-3 fatty acids provided in one gel capsule …

Contributors
Teran, Bianca Maria, Johnston, Carol, Johnson, Melinda, et al.
Created Date
2013

Cardiovascular disease has reached epidemic proportions resulting in its ranking as the number one cause of mortality in the Western world. A key player in the pathophysiology of vascular disease is oxidative stress due to free radical accumulation. This intervention study was conducted to evaluate any potential mediation of oxidative stress using a soil-derived organometallic compound (OMC) with suspected antioxidant properties. A 10-week study was conducted in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 42) fed either a high-fat diet (HFD) consisting of 60% kcal from fat or a standard Chow diet containing only 6% kcals from fat. Rats from each diet …

Contributors
Watson, Deborah, Sweazea, Karen L, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2018

Background: Higher intake of carbohydrates in the evening and later eating times has been associated with higher total energy intake (TEI)1-3 and higher risk of being overweight or obese.1,4 Though existing evidence indicates a link between added sugars intake and increased body mass index (BMI), the effect of daily patterns of added sugars intake on TEI and BMI is unknown. Research on added sugars has relied on self-report dietary assessments with limited days of dietary data, resulting in unreliable estimates. The purpose of this thesis was to describe patterns of added sugars consumption, and to investigate the relationship between dietary …

Contributors
Gunnerson, Hannah Marie, Tasevska, Natasha, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2019