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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2018


The Internet of Things ecosystem has spawned a wide variety of embedded real-time systems that complicate the identification and resolution of bugs in software. The methods of concurrent checkpoint provide a means to monitor the application state with the ability to replay the execution on like hardware and software, without holding off and delaying the execution of application threads. In this thesis, it is accomplished by monitoring physical memory of the application using a soft-dirty page tracker and measuring the various types of overhead when employing concurrent checkpointing. The solution presented is an advancement of the Checkpoint and Replay In …

Contributors
Prinke, Michael L, Lee, Yann-Hang, Shrivastava, Aviral, et al.
Created Date
2018

General-purpose processors propel the advances and innovations that are the subject of humanity’s many endeavors. Catering to this demand, chip-multiprocessors (CMPs) and general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) have seen many high-performance innovations in their architectures. With these advances, the memory subsystem has become the performance- and energy-limiting aspect of CMPs and GPGPUs alike. This dissertation identifies and mitigates the key performance and energy-efficiency bottlenecks in the memory subsystem of general-purpose processors via novel, practical, microarchitecture and system-architecture solutions. Addressing the important Last Level Cache (LLC) management problem in CMPs, I observe that LLC management decisions made in isolation, as in …

Contributors
Arunkumar, Akhil, Wu, Carole-Jean, Shrivastava, Aviral, et al.
Created Date
2018

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are being used in many safety-critical applications. Due to the important role in virtually every aspect of human life, it is crucial to make sure that a CPS works properly before its deployment. However, formal verification of CPS is a computationally hard problem. Therefore, lightweight verification methods such as testing and monitoring of the CPS are considered in the industry. The formal representation of the CPS requirements is a challenging task. In addition, checking the system outputs with respect to requirements is a computationally complex problem. In this dissertation, these problems for the verification of CPS are …

Contributors
Dokhanchi, Adel, Fainekos, Georgios, Lee, Yann-Hang, et al.
Created Date
2017

Cisco estimates that by 2020, 50 billion devices will be connected to the Internet. But 99% of the things today remain isolated and unconnected. Different connectivity protocols, proprietary access, varied device characteristics, security concerns are the main reasons for that isolated state. This project aims at designing and building a prototype gateway that exposes a simple and intuitive HTTP Restful interface to access and manipulate devices and the data that they produce while addressing most of the issues listed above. Along with manipulating devices, the framework exposes sensor data in such a way that it can be used to create …

Contributors
Nair, Shankar, Lee, Yann-Hang, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2015

Most embedded applications are constructed with multiple threads to handle concurrent events. For optimization and debugging of the programs, dynamic program analysis is widely used to collect execution information while the program is running. Unfortunately, the non-deterministic behavior of multithreaded embedded software makes the dynamic analysis difficult. In addition, instrumentation overhead for gathering execution information may change the execution of a program, and lead to distorted analysis results, i.e., probe effect. This thesis presents a framework that tackles the non-determinism and probe effect incurred in dynamic analysis of embedded software. The thesis largely consists of three parts. First of all, …

Contributors
Song, Young Wn, Lee, Yann-Hang, Shrivastava, Aviral, et al.
Created Date
2015

Computational thinking, the creative thought process behind algorithmic design and programming, is a crucial introductory skill for both computer scientists and the population in general. In this thesis I perform an investigation into introductory computer science education in the United States and find that computational thinking is not effectively taught at either the high school or the college level. To remedy this, I present a new educational system intended to teach computational thinking called Genost. Genost consists of a software tool and a curriculum based on teaching computational thinking through fundamental programming structures and algorithm design. Genost's software design is …

Contributors
Walliman, Garret Greg, Atkinson, Robert, Chen, Yinong, et al.
Created Date
2015

A benchmark suite that is representative of the programs a processor typically executes is necessary to understand a processor's performance or energy consumption characteristics. The first contribution of this work addresses this need for mobile platforms with MobileBench, a selection of representative smartphone applications. In smartphones, like any other portable computing systems, energy is a limited resource. Based on the energy characterization of a commercial widely-used smartphone, application cores are found to consume a significant part of the total energy consumption of the device. With this insight, the subsequent part of this thesis focuses on the portion of energy that …

Contributors
Pandiyan, Dhinakaran, Wu, Carole-Jean, Shrivastava, Aviral, et al.
Created Date
2014

The need for multi-core architectural trends was realized in the desktop computing domain fairly long back. This trend is also beginning to be seen in the deeply embedded systems such as automotive and avionics industry owing to ever increasing demands in terms of sheer computational bandwidth, responsiveness, reliability and power consumption constraints. The adoption of such multi-core architectures in safety critical systems is often met with resistance owing to the overhead in migration of the existing stable code base to the new system setup, typically requiring extensive re-design. This also brings about the need for exhaustive testing and validation that …

Contributors
Bulusu, Girish Rao, Lee, Yann-Hang, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2014

Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Architectures (CGRA) are a promising fabric for improving the performance and power-efficiency of computing devices. CGRAs are composed of components that are well-optimized to execute loops and rotating register file is an example of such a component present in CGRAs. Due to the rotating nature of register indexes in rotating register file, it is very challenging, if at all possible, to hold and properly index memory addresses (pointers) and static values. In this Thesis, different structures for CGRA register files are investigated. Those structures are experimentally compared in terms of performance of mapped applications, design frequency, and area. …

Contributors
SALUJA, Dipal, Shrivastava, Aviral, Lee, Yann-Hang, et al.
Created Date
2014

Modeling dynamic systems is an interesting problem in Knowledge Representation (KR) due to their usefulness in reasoning about real-world environments. In order to effectively do this, a number of different formalisms have been considered ranging from low-level languages, such as Answer Set Programming (ASP), to high-level action languages, such as C+ and BC. These languages show a lot of promise over many traditional approaches as they allow a developer to automate many tasks which require reasoning within dynamic environments in a succinct and elaboration tolerant manner. However, despite their strengths, they are still insufficient for modeling many systems, especially those …

Contributors
Babb, Joseph Allyn, Lee, Joohyung, Lee, Yann-Hang, et al.
Created Date
2014