Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Programming is quickly becoming as ubiquitous and essential a skill as general mathematics. However, many elementary and high school students are still not aware of what the computer science field entails. To make matters worse, students who are introduced to computer science are frequently being fed only part of what it is about rather than its entire construction. Consequently, they feel out of their depth when they approach college. Research has discovered that by teaching computer science and programming through a problem-driven approach and focusing on a combination of syntax and computational thinking, students can be prepared when entering higher …

Contributors
Kury, Nizar, Nelson, Brian C, Hsiao, Ihan, et al.
Created Date
2017

Currently, educational games are designed with the educational content as the primary factor driving the design of the game. While this may seem to be the optimal approach, this design paradigm causes multiple issues. For one, the games themselves are often not engaging as game design principles were put aside in favor of increasing the educational value of the game. The other issue is that the code base of the game is mostly or completely unusable for any other games as the game mechanics are too strongly connected to the educational content being taught. This means that the mechanics are …

Contributors
Baron, Tyler John, Amresh, Ashish, Nelson, Brian C, et al.
Created Date
2017

One of the primary objective in a computer science related course is for students to be able to write programs implementing the concepts covered in that course. In educational psychology, however, learning gains are more commonly measured using recall or problem solving questions. While these types of questions are relevant to computer science exams, they do not necessarily reflect a student’s ability to apply concepts by writing an original program to solve a novel problem. This thesis investigates the effectiveness of including questions within instructional multimedia content to improve student performance on a related programming assignment. Similar techniques have proven …

Contributors
Mar, Christopher, Sohoni, Sohum, Nelson, Brian C, et al.
Created Date
2016

Hospital Emergency Departments (EDs) are frequently crowded. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) collects performance measurements from EDs such as that of the door to clinician time. The door to clinician time is the time at which a patient is first seen by a clinician. Current methods for documenting the door to clinician time are in written form and may contain inaccuracies. The goal of this thesis is to provide a method for automatic and accurate retrieval and documentation of the door to clinician time. To automatically collect door to clinician times, single board computers were installed in …

Contributors
Frisby, Joshua, Nelson, Brian C, Patel, Vimla L, et al.
Created Date
2015

Statistics is taught at every level of education, yet teachers often have to assume their students have no knowledge of statistics and start from scratch each time they set out to teach statistics. The motivation for this experimental study comes from interest in exploring educational applications of augmented reality (AR) delivered via mobile technology that could potentially provide rich, contextualized learning for understanding concepts related to statistics education. This study examined the effects of AR experiences for learning basic statistical concepts. Using a 3 x 2 research design, this study compared learning gains of 252 undergraduate and graduate students from …

Contributors
Conley, Quincy, Atkinson, Robert K, Nguyen, Frank, et al.
Created Date
2013