Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


Date Range
2012 2017

Shock loading is a complex phenomenon that can lead to failure mechanisms such as strain localization, void nucleation and growth, and eventually spall fracture. Studying incipient stages of spall damage is of paramount importance to accurately determine initiation sites in the material microstructure where damage will nucleate and grow and to formulate continuum models that account for the variability of the damage process due to microstructural heterogeneity. The length scale of damage with respect to that of the surrounding microstructure has proven to be a key aspect in determining sites of failure initiation. Correlations have been found between the damage ...

Contributors
Krishnan, Kapil, Peralta, Pedro, Mignolet, Marc, et al.
Created Date
2013

A new critical plane-energy model is proposed in this thesis for multiaxial fatigue life prediction of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Brief review of existing methods, especially on the critical plane-based and energy-based methods, are given first. Special focus is on one critical plane approach which has been shown to work for both brittle and ductile metals. The key idea is to automatically change the critical plane orientation with respect to different materials and stress states. One potential drawback of the developed model is that it needs an empirical calibration parameter for non-proportional multiaxial loadings since only the strain terms are ...

Contributors
Wei, Haoyang, Liu, Yongming, Jiang, Hanqing, et al.
Created Date
2016

Fracture phenomena have been extensively studied in the last several decades. Continuum mechanics-based approaches, such as finite element methods and extended finite element methods, are widely used for fracture simulation. One well-known issue of these approaches is the stress singularity resulted from the spatial discontinuity at the crack tip/front. The requirement of guiding criteria for various cracking behaviors, such as initiation, propagation, and branching, also poses some challenges. Comparing to the continuum based formulation, the discrete approaches, such as lattice spring method, discrete element method, and peridynamics, have certain advantages when modeling various fracture problems due to their intrinsic characteristics ...

Contributors
Chen, Hailong, Liu, Yongming, Jiao, Yang, et al.
Created Date
2015

A method for modelling the interactions of dislocations with inclusions has been developed to analyse toughening mechanisms in alloys. This method is different from the superposition method in that infinite domain solutions and image stress fields are not superimposed. The method is based on the extended finite element method (XFEM) in which the dislocations are modelled according to the Volterra dislocation model. Interior discontinuities are introduced across dislocation glide planes using enrichment functions and the resulting boundary value problem is solved through the standard finite element variational approach. The level set method is used to describe the geometry of the ...

Contributors
Veeresh, Pawan Manjunath, Oswald, Jay, Jiang, Hanqing, et al.
Created Date
2016

Cavitation erosion is a significant cause of wear in marine components, such as impellers, propellers or rudders. While the erosion process has been widely studied on metals, the effect of cavitation on polymers is not well-understood. The stress response in metals differs greatly from that of polymers, e.g. rate and temperature effects are far more important, thus damage and wear mechanisms of polymers under cavitating flows are significantly different. In this work, heat-driven failure caused by viscous dissipation and void nucleation resulting from tensile stresses arising from stress wave reflections are investigated as two possible material failure mechanisms. As a ...

Contributors
Panwar, Ajay, Oswald, Jay, Dooley, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2015

Monte Carlo simulations are traditionally carried out for the determination of the amplification of forced vibration response of turbomachine/jet engine blades to mistuning. However, this effort can be computationally time consuming even when using the various reduced order modeling techniques. Accordingly, some investigations in the past have focused on obtaining simple approximate estimates for this amplification. In particular, two of these have proposed the use of harmonic patterns of the blade properties around the disk as an approximate alternative to the many random patterns of Monte Carlo analyses. These investigations, while quite encouraging, have relied solely on single degree of ...

Contributors
Sahoo, Saurav, Mignolet, Marc Paul, Chattopadhyay, Aditi, et al.
Created Date
2014

ABSTRACT A large fraction of the total energy consumption in the world comes from heating and cooling of buildings. Improving the energy efficiency of buildings to reduce the needs of seasonal heating and cooling is one of the major challenges in sustainable development. In general, the energy efficiency depends on the geometry and material of the buildings. To explore a framework for accurately assessing this dependence, detailed 3-D thermofluid simulations are performed by systematically sweeping the parameter space spanned by four parameters: the size of building, thickness and material of wall, and fractional size of window. The simulations incorporate realistic ...

Contributors
Jain, Gaurav, Huang, Huei-Ping, Ren, Yi, et al.
Created Date
2016

Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a materials degradation phenomena resulting from a combination of stress and a corrosive environment. Among the alphabet soup of proposed mechanism of SCC the most important are film-rupture, film-induced cleavage and hydrogen embrittlement. This work examines various aspects of film-induced cleavage in gold alloys for which the operation of hydrogen embrittlement processes can be strictly ruled out on thermodynamic grounds. This is so because in such alloys SCC occurs under electrochemical conditions within which water is stable to hydrogen gas evolution. The alloy system examined in this work is AgAu since the corrosion processes in ...

Contributors
CHEN, XIYING, Sieradzki, Karl, Jiao, Yang, et al.
Created Date
2016

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of six conceptual designs proposed for Generation IV nuclear reactors. Alloy 617, a solid solution strengthened Ni-base superalloy, is currently the primary candidate material for the tubing of the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in the VHTR design. Steady-state operation of the nuclear power plant at elevated temperatures leads to creep deformation, whereas loading transients including startup and shutdown generate fatigue. A detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue interaction in Alloy 617 is necessary before it can be considered as a material for nuclear construction in ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Current design ...

Contributors
Tahir, Fraaz, Liu, Yongming, Jiang, Hanqing, et al.
Created Date
2017

Characterization and modeling of deformation and failure in metallic materials under extreme conditions, such as the high loads and strain rates found under shock loading due to explosive detonation and high velocity-impacts, are extremely important for a wide variety of military and industrial applications. When a shock wave causes stress in a material that exceeds the elastic limit, plasticity and eventually spallation occur in the material. The process of spall fracture, which in ductile materials stems from strain localization, void nucleation, growth and coalescence, can be caused by microstructural heterogeneity. The analysis of void nucleation performed from a microstructurally explicit ...

Contributors
Gautam, Sudrishti, Peralta, Pedro, Oswald, Jay, et al.
Created Date
2016

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.