ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Date Range
2010 2017

A dual chamber molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system was rebuilt for the growth of 6.1 Angstrom II-VI and III-V compound semiconductor materials that are to be used in novel optoelectronic devices that take advantage of the nearly continuous bandgap availability between 0 eV and 3.4 eV. These devices include multijunction solar cells and multicolor detectors. The MBE system upgrade involved the conversion of a former III-V chamber for II-VI growth. This required intensive cleaning of the chamber and components to prevent contamination. Special features including valved II-VI sources and the addition of a cold trap allowed for the full system ...

Contributors
Dettlaff, William Henry Gerald, Zhang, Yong-Hang, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2012

Zinc oxide (ZnO), a naturally n-type semiconductor has been identified as a promising candidate to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) as the transparent electrode in solar cells, because of its wide bandgap (3.37 eV), abundant source materials and suitable refractive index (2.0 at 600 nm). Spray deposition is a convenient and low cost technique for large area and uniform deposition of semiconductor thin films. In particular, it provides an easier way to dope the film by simply adding the dopant precursor into the starting solution. In order to reduce the resistivity of undoped ZnO, many works have been done by ...

Contributors
Zhou, Bin, Tao, Meng, Goryll, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2013

Self-heating degrades the performance of devices in advanced technology nodes. Understanding of self-heating effects is necessary to improve device performance. Heat generation in these devices occurs at nanometer scales but heat transfer is a microscopic phenomena. Hence a multi-scale modeling approach is required to study the self-heating effects. A state of the art Monte Carlo device simulator and the commercially available Giga 3D tool from Silvaco are used in our study to understand the self heating effects. The Monte Carlo device simulator solves the electrical transport and heat generation for nanometer length scales accurately while the Giga 3D tool solves ...

Contributors
Shaik, Abdul Rawoof, Vasileska, Dragica, Ferry, David, et al.
Created Date
2016

This dissertation aims to study and understand the effect of nonlinear dynamics and quantum chaos in graphene, optomechanics, photonics and spintronics systems. First, in graphene quantum dot systems, conductance fluctuations are investigated from the respects of Fano resonances and quantum chaos. The conventional semi-classical theory of quantum chaotic scattering used in this field depends on an invariant classical phase-space structure. I show that for systems without an invariant classical phase-space structure, the quantum pointer states can still be used to explain the conductance fluctuations. Another finding is that the chaotic geometry is demonstrated to have similar effects as the disorders ...

Contributors
Wang, Guanglei, Lai, Ying-Cheng, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2017

This PhD thesis consists of three main themes. The first part focusses on modeling of Silver (Ag)-Chalcogenide glass based resistive memory devices known as the Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC). The proposed models are examined with the Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations. In order to find a relationship between electrochemistry and carrier-trap statistics in chalcogenide glass films, an analytical mapping for electron trapping is derived. Then, a physical-based model is proposed in order to explain the dynamic behavior of the photodoping mechanism in lateral PMCs. At the end, in order to extract the time constant of ChG materials, a method ...

Contributors
Saremi, Mehdi, Goodnick, Stephen M, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2017

This work demonstrates novel nBn photodetectors including mid-wave infrared (MWIR) nBn photodetectors based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) with charge as the output signal, and visible nBn photodetectors based on CdTe with current output. Furthermore, visible/MWIR two-color photodetectors (2CPDs) are fabricated through monolithic integration of the CdTe nBn photodetector and an InSb photodiode. The MWIR nBn photodetectors have a potential well for holes present in the barrier layer. At low voltages of < −0.2 V, which ensure low dark current <10-5 A/cm2 at 77 K, photogenerated holes are collected in this well with a storage lifetime of 40 s. This ...

Contributors
He, Zhaoyu, Zhang, Yong-Hang, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2016

Sb-based type-II superlattices (T2SLs) are potential alternative to HgCdTe for infrared detection due to their low manufacturing cost, good uniformity, high structural stability, and suppressed Auger recombination. The emerging InAs/InAsSb T2SLs have minority carrier lifetimes 1-2 orders of magnitude longer than those of the well-studied InAs/InGaSb T2SLs, and therefore have the potential to achieve photodetectors with higher performance. This work develops a novel method to measure the minority carrier lifetimes in infrared materials, and reports a comprehensive characterization of minority carrier lifetime and transport in InAs/InAsSb T2SLs at temperatures below 77 K. A real-time baseline correction (RBC) method for minority ...

Contributors
Lin, Zhiyuan, Zhang, Yong-Hang, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2016

GaAs single-junction solar cells have been studied extensively in recent years, and have reached over 28 % efficiency. Further improvement requires an optically thick but physically thin absorber to provide both large short-circuit current and high open-circuit voltage. By detailed simulation, it is concluded that ultra-thin GaAs cells with hundreds of nanometers thickness and reflective back scattering can potentially offer efficiencies greater than 30 %. The 300 nm GaAs solar cell with AlInP/Au reflective back scattering is carefully designed and demonstrates an efficiency of 19.1 %. The device performance is analyzed using the semi-analytical model with Phong distribution implemented to ...

Contributors
Liu, Shi, Zhang, Yong-Hang, Johnson, Shane R, et al.
Created Date
2015

The goal of this research work is to develop a particle-based device simulator for modeling strained silicon devices. Two separate modules had to be developed for that purpose: A generic bulk Monte Carlo simulation code which in the long-time limit solves the Boltzmann transport equation for electrons; and an extension to this code that solves for the bulk properties of strained silicon. One scattering table is needed for conventional silicon, whereas, because of the strain breaking the symmetry of the system, three scattering tables are needed for modeling strained silicon material. Simulation results for the average drift velocity and the ...

Contributors
Qazi, Suleman Sami, Vasileska, Dragica, Goodnick, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2013

Silicon solar cells with heterojunction carrier collectors based on a-Si/c-Si heterojunction (SHJ) have a potential to overcome the limitations of the conventional diffused junction solar cells and become the next industry standard manufacturing technology of solar cells. A brand feature of SHJ technology is ultrapassivated surfaces with already demonstrated 750 mV open circuit voltages (Voc) and 24.7% efficiency on large area solar cell. Despite very good results achieved in research and development, large volume manufacturing of high efficiency SHJ cells remains a fundamental challenge. The main objectives of this work were to develop a SHJ solar cell fabrication flow using ...

Contributors
Herasimenka, Stanislau Yur'Yevich, Honsberg, Christiana B, Bowden, Stuart G, et al.
Created Date
2013

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.