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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2013 2019


One of the main goals of computer architecture design is to improve performance without much increase in the power consumption. It cannot be achieved by adding increasingly complex intelligent schemes in the hardware, since they will become increasingly less power-efficient. Therefore, parallelism comes up as the solution. In fact, the irrevocable trend of computer design in near future is still to keep increasing the number of cores while reducing the operating frequency. However, it is not easy to scale number of cores. One important challenge is that existing cores consume too much power. Another challenge is that cache-based memory hierarchy …

Contributors
Lu, Jing, Shrivastava, Aviral, Sarjoughian, Hessam, et al.
Created Date
2019

Advances in semiconductor technology have brought computer-based systems intovirtually all aspects of human life. This unprecedented integration of semiconductor based systems in our lives has significantly increased the domain and the number of safety-critical applications – application with unacceptable consequences of failure. Software-level error resilience schemes are attractive because they can provide commercial-off-the-shelf microprocessors with adaptive and scalable reliability. Among all software-level error resilience solutions, in-application instruction replication based approaches have been widely used and are deemed to be the most effective. However, existing instruction-based replication schemes only protect some part of computations i.e. arithmetic and logical instructions and leave …

Contributors
Didehban, Moslem, Shrivastava, Aviral, Wu, Carole-Jean, et al.
Created Date
2018

General-purpose processors propel the advances and innovations that are the subject of humanity’s many endeavors. Catering to this demand, chip-multiprocessors (CMPs) and general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) have seen many high-performance innovations in their architectures. With these advances, the memory subsystem has become the performance- and energy-limiting aspect of CMPs and GPGPUs alike. This dissertation identifies and mitigates the key performance and energy-efficiency bottlenecks in the memory subsystem of general-purpose processors via novel, practical, microarchitecture and system-architecture solutions. Addressing the important Last Level Cache (LLC) management problem in CMPs, I observe that LLC management decisions made in isolation, as in …

Contributors
Arunkumar, Akhil, Wu, Carole-Jean, Shrivastava, Aviral, et al.
Created Date
2018

With the massive multithreading execution feature, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely deployed to accelerate general-purpose parallel workloads (GPGPUs). However, using GPUs to accelerate computation does not always gain good performance improvement. This is mainly due to three inefficiencies in modern GPU and system architectures. First, not all parallel threads have a uniform amount of workload to fully utilize GPU’s computation ability, leading to a sub-optimal performance problem, called warp criticality. To mitigate the degree of warp criticality, I propose a Criticality-Aware Warp Acceleration mechanism, called CAWA. CAWA predicts and accelerates the critical warp execution by allocating larger execution …

Contributors
Lee, Shin-Ying, Wu, Carole-Jean, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2017

Cyber-physical systems and hard real-time systems have strict timing constraints that specify deadlines until which tasks must finish their execution. Missing a deadline can cause unexpected outcome or endanger human lives in safety-critical applications, such as automotive or aeronautical systems. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to obtain and optimize a safe upper bound of each task’s execution time or the worst-case execution time (WCET), to guarantee the absence of any missed deadline. Unfortunately, conventional microarchitectural components, such as caches and branch predictors, are only optimized for average-case performance and often make WCET analysis complicated and pessimistic. Caches especially have …

Contributors
Kim, Yooseong, Shrivastava, Aviral, Broman, David, et al.
Created Date
2017

The availability of a wide range of general purpose as well as accelerator cores on modern smartphones means that a significant number of applications can be executed on a smartphone simultaneously, resulting in an ever increasing demand on the memory subsystem. While the increased computation capability is intended for improving user experience, memory requests from each concurrent application exhibit unique memory access patterns as well as specific timing constraints. If not considered, this could lead to significant memory contention and result in lowered user experience. This work first analyzes the impact of memory degradation caused by the interference at the …

Contributors
SHINGARI, DAVESH, Wu, Carole-Jean, Vrudhula, Sarma, et al.
Created Date
2016

Several decades of transistor technology scaling has brought the threat of soft errors to modern embedded processors. Several techniques have been proposed to protect these systems from soft errors. However, their effectiveness in protecting the computation cannot be ascertained without accurate and quantitative estimation of system reliability. Vulnerability -- a metric that defines the probability of system-failure (reliability) through analytical models -- is the most effective mechanism for our current estimation and early design space exploration needs. Previous vulnerability estimation tools are based around the Sim-Alpha simulator which has been to shown to have several limitations. In this thesis, I …

Contributors
Tanikella, Srinivas Karthik, Shrivastava, Aviral, Bazzi, Rida, et al.
Created Date
2016

As persistent non-volatile memory solutions become integrated in the computing ecosystem and landscape, traditional commodity file systems architected and developed for traditional block I/O based memory solutions must be reevaluated. A majority of commodity file systems have been architected and designed with the goal of managing data on non-volatile storage devices such as hard disk drives (HDDs) and solid state drives (SSDs). HDDs and SSDs are attached to a computing system via a controller or I/O hub, often referred to as the southbridge. The point of HDD and SSD attachment creates multiple levels of translation for any data managed by …

Contributors
Robles, Raymond C., Syrotiuk, Violet, Sohoni, Sohum, et al.
Created Date
2016

Widespread adoption of smartphone based Mobile Medical Apps (MMAs) is opening new avenues for innovation, bringing MMAs to the forefront of low cost healthcare delivery. These apps often control human physiology and work on sensitive data. Thus it is necessary to have evidences of their trustworthiness i.e. maintaining privacy of health data, long term operation of wearable sensors and ensuring no harm to the user before actual marketing. Traditionally, clinical studies are used to validate the trustworthiness of medical systems. However, they can take long time and could potentially harm the user. Such evidences can be generated using simulations and …

Contributors
Bagade, Priyanka, Gupta, Sandeep K. S., Wu, Carole-Jean, et al.
Created Date
2015

Virtual machines and containers have steadily improved their performance over time as a result of innovations in their architecture and software ecosystems. Network functions and workloads are increasingly migrating to virtual environments, supported by developments in software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). Previous performance analyses of virtual systems in this context often ignore significant performance gains that can be acheived with practical modifications to hypervisor and host systems. In this thesis, the network performance of containers and virtual machines are measured with standard network performance tools. The performance of these systems utilizing a standard 3.18.20 Linux kernel …

Contributors
Welch, James Matthew, Syrotiuk, Violet R, Wu, Carole-Jean, et al.
Created Date
2015