Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2004 2020


The intracellular motility seen in the cytoplasm of angiosperm plant pollen tubes is known as reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming (i.e., cyclosis). This effect occurs when organelles move anterograde along the cortex of the cell and retrograde down the center of the cell. The result is a displacement of cytoplasmic volume causing a cyclic motion of organelles and bulk liquid. Visually, the organelles appear to be traveling in a backwards fountain hence the name. The use of light microscopy bioimaging in this study has documented reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming for the first time in fungal hyphae of Rhizopus oryzae and other …

Contributors
Shange, Phakade Mdima, Roberson, Robert W, Gile, Gillian, et al.
Created Date
2020

ABSTRACT This dissertation examines the role of tribal sovereignty and self-determination in research for Diné participants and elders from 1956-1986. The qualitative historical research study explored the following questions: How has past research been conducted on the Navajo Nation? What is the role of sovereignty and self-determination in research and research methodology for Diné peoples? And, how might Diné philosophy inform a research methodology that aligns with cultural protocols and practices? Six elders who participated in research from 1956-1986 participated in in-depth interviews about their experiences. Using Sa’ąh Naaghái Bik’eh Hozhǫ̨̨́ǫ́n and related Diné philosophy models, findings of this study …

Contributors
Henderson, Sharon Leann, Brayboy, Bryan, Solyom, Jessica, et al.
Created Date
2020

Underground infrastructure is a critical part of the essential utility services provided to society and the backbone of modern civilization. However, now more than ever before, the disastrous events of a striking underground utilities cost billions of dollars each year in societal damages. Advanced technology and sophisticated visualization techniques such as augmented reality (AR) now play a significant role in mitigating such devastating consequences. Therefore, it is vitally important to coordinate resources, share information, and ensure efficient communication between construction personnel and utility owners. Besides, geographic information systems (GIS) provide a solution for interoperability in the construction industry. Applying such …

Contributors
Fenais, Amr, Ariaratnam, Samuel T, Ayer, Steven K, et al.
Created Date
2020

The human ankle is a vital joint in the lower limb of the human body. As the point of interaction between the human neuromuscular system and the physical world, the ankle plays important role in lower extremity functions including postural balance and locomotion . Accurate characterization of ankle mechanics in lower extremity function is essential not just to advance the design and control of robots physically interacting with the human lower extremities but also in rehabilitation of humans suffering from neurodegenerative disorders. In order to characterize the ankle mechanics and understand the underlying mechanisms that influence the neuromuscular properties of …

Contributors
Nalam, Varun, Lee, Hyunglae, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, et al.
Created Date
2020

Satellite cells are adult muscle stem cells that activate, proliferate, and differentiate into myofibers upon muscle damage. Satellite cells can be cultured and manipulated in vitro, and thus represent an accessible model for studying skeletal muscle biology, and a potential source of autologous stem cells for regenerative medicine. This work summarizes efforts to further understanding of satellite cell biology, using novel model organisms, bioengineering, and molecular and cellular approaches. Lizards are evolutionarily the closest vertebrates to humans that regenerate entire appendages. An analysis of lizard myoprogenitor cell transcriptome determined they were most transcriptionally similar to mammalian satellite cells. Further examination …

Contributors
Palade, Joanna, Wilson-Rawls, Norma, Rawls, Jeffrey, et al.
Created Date
2020

Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express synthetic antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) has provocative therapeutic applications for treating cancer. However, expressing these synthetic TCRs in a CD4+ T cell line is a challenge. The CD4+ Jurkat T cell line expresses endogenous TCRs that compete for space, accessory proteins, and proliferative signaling, and there is the potential for mixed dimer formation between the α and β chains of the endogenous receptor and that of the synthetic cancer-specific TCRs. To prevent hybridization between the receptors and to ensure the binding affinity measured with flow cytometry analysis is between the tetramer …

Contributors
Hirneise, Gabrielle Rachel, Anderson, Karen, Mason, Hugh, et al.
Created Date
2020

Blalock’s (1967) minority threat perspective is one of the most empirically investigated theories of crime control in criminological literature. A large body of research has tested this perspective and established a link between minority context and increased criminal justice controls. The perceived threat mechanisms hypothesized to facilitate this link, however, have received relatively scant attention. In addition, no multidimensional scale of perceived minority threat has been developed. These oversights have significantly impeded the advancement of research testing the empirical validity and generalizability of Blalock’s premises across racial and ethnic groups. Against this backdrop, this dissertation extends prior work by conducting …

Contributors
Infante, Arynn A, Wang, Xia, Pardini, Dustin, et al.
Created Date
2020

Extended crystal defects often play a critical role in determining semiconductor device performance. This dissertation describes the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected scanning TEM (AC-STEM) to study defect clusters and the atomic-scale structure of defects in compound semiconductors. An extensive effort was made to identify specific locations of crystal defects in epitaxial CdTe that might contribute to degraded light-conversion efficiency. Electroluminescence (EL) mapping and the creation of surface etch pits through chemical treatment were combined in attempts to identify specific structural defects for subsequent TEM examination. Observations of these specimens revealed only surface etch pits, without any …

Contributors
McKeon, Brandon, Smith, David J., McCartney, Martha R., et al.
Created Date
2020

In this dissertation, I examine how social perceptions of physical disability shape interactions in healthcare. Drawing upon the lived experience and insights of Diné (Navajo) individuals with physical disabilities, family members, and Diné/non-indigenous healthcare workers and service providers, I explore the interrelationship of social perceptions of physical disability with understandings of identity and performance of personhood. Embedded within discourses and critiques of ableism/disablism, narratives highlight the interconnection of constructs of personhood and productivity. Findings show that social perceptions of physical disability are closely linked to broader cultural norms surrounding concepts of health/illness. I offer a critical analysis of contemporary impacts …

Contributors
Varvarezou, Dimitra, Maupin, Jonathan N, Gaughan, Monica, et al.
Created Date
2020

The small mitogenic cytokine Pleiotrophin (PTN) is well-known for its roles in tissue growth, development, and repair. First isolated from neuronal tissues, much interest in this protein resides in development of the central nervous system and neuronal regeneration. Owning to its role in growth, development and its ability to promote angiogenesis and metastasis, PTN’s overexpression in cancers such as glioblastoma, has become the focal point of much research. Many of the receptors through which PTN acts contain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), through which PTN binds. Thus, understanding the atomistic detail of PTN’s architecture and interaction with GAG chains is of significant importance …

Contributors
Ryan, Eathen, Wang, Xu, Yarger, Jeffery, et al.
Created Date
2020

Special education identification processes related to English language learners (ELs) in the United States have puzzled the field for decades. The phenomenon of referrals, the first step toward identification, is complex since it requires deciphering the root cause of students’ learning struggles—e.g., second language (L2) factors, the possibility of a learning disability (LD), or the combination of multiple other influences. To investigate the various influences contributing to learning difficulties, I centered this study on three potential sources, individual, institutional, and interpersonal. I aimed to answer, how did sociocultural influences mediate a teacher’s understanding of ELs’ competence? How did sociocultural influences …

Contributors
Alvarado, Sarah Lopez, Artiles, Alfredo J., Graham, Steve, et al.
Created Date
2020

The Java programing language was implemented in such a way as to limit the amount of possible ways that a program written in Java could be exploited. Unfortunately, all of the protections and safeguards put in place for Java can be circumvented if a program created in Java utilizes internal or external libraries that were created in a separate, insecure language such as C or C++. A secure Java program can then be made insecure and susceptible to even classic vulnerabilities such as stack overflows, string format attacks, and heap overflows and corruption. Through the internal or external libraries included …

Contributors
Gibbs, William, Doupé, Adam, Wang, Ruoyu, et al.
Created Date
2020

Generative Adversarial Networks are designed, in theory, to replicate the distribution of the data they are trained on. With real-world limitations, such as finite network capacity and training set size, they inevitably suffer a yet unavoidable technical failure: mode collapse. GAN-generated data is not nearly as diverse as the real-world data the network is trained on; this work shows that this effect is especially drastic when the training data is highly non-uniform. Specifically, GANs learn to exacerbate the social biases which exist in the training set along sensitive axes such as gender and race. In an age where many datasets …

Contributors
Jain, Niharika, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Liu, Huan, et al.
Created Date
2020

Cancer is a disease involving abnormal growth of cells. Its growth dynamics is perplexing. Mathematical modeling is a way to shed light on this progress and its medical treatments. This dissertation is to study cancer invasion in time and space using a mathematical approach. Chapter 1 presents a detailed review of literature on cancer modeling. Chapter 2 focuses sorely on time where the escape of a generic cancer out of immune control is described by stochastic delayed differential equations (SDDEs). Without time delay and noise, this system demonstrates bistability. The effects of response time of the immune system and stochasticity …

Contributors
HaN, Lifeng, Kuang, Yang, Fricks, John, et al.
Created Date
2020

A mathematical approach was developed to evaluate the resilience of coupled power-water networks using a variant of contingency analysis adapted from electric transmission studies. In particular, the “what if” scenarios explored in power systems research were extended and applied for coupled power-water network research by evaluating how stressors and failures in the water network can propagate across system boundaries and into the electric network. Reduction in power system contingency reserves was the metric for determining violation of N-1 contingency reliability. Geospatial considerations were included using high-resolution, publicly available Geographic Information System data on infrastructure in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area that …

Contributors
Gorman, Brandon, Johnson, Nathan G, Seager, Thomas P, et al.
Created Date
2020

English proficiency is one of the major factors affecting international students’ academic adjustment to American universities. Many international college students select to improve their academic English proficiency through an English intensive program. Collaborative learning is an educational approach to teaching and learning that allows students and teachers to engage in a common task and work together to search for knowledge and skills. This thesis study aims to develop, design, and iteratively refine strategies to help English intensive program teachers build collaborative learning and promote international students’ effective collaboration, so as to improve students' academic English proficiency. In this study, two …

Contributors
Nolastname, Digengni, Wolf, Leigh Graves, Zuiker, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2020

The overarching aim of this dissertation is to evaluate Geodesign as a planning approach for American Indian communities in the American Southwest. There has been a call amongst indigenous planners for a planning approach that prioritizes indigenous and community values and traditions while incorporating Western planning techniques. Case studies from communities in the Navajo Nation and the Tohono O’odham Nation are used to evaluate Geodesign because they possess sovereign powers of self-government within their reservation boundaries and have historical and technical barriers that have limited land use planning efforts. This research aimed to increase the knowledge base of indigenous planning, …

Contributors
Davis, Jonathan Michael, Pijawka, David, Wentz, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2020

This research is a comprehensive study of the sustainable modifiers for asphalt binder. It is a common practice to use modifiers to impart certain properties to asphalt binder; however, in order to facilitate the synthesis and design of highly effective sustainable modifiers, it is critical to thoroughly understand their underlying molecular level mechanisms in combination with micro and macro-level behavior. Therefore, this study incorporates a multi-scale approach using computational modeling and laboratory experiments to provide an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between selected modifiers and the constituents of asphalt binder, at aged and unaged conditions. This study investigated …

Contributors
Samieadel, Alireza, Fini, Elham H, Kaloush, Kamil E, et al.
Created Date
2020

This dissertation seeks to understand two universal experiences that have pervaded human society since man first climbed out of the trees: violence and trauma. Using theories gleaned from the Holocaust and other twentieth century atrocities, this work explores narratives of violent action and traumatic reaction as they occurred among peoples of the nineteenth-century American Southwest. By examining the stories of individuals and groups of Apaches, Ethnic Mexicans, Euro-Americans, and other diverse peoples within the lens of trauma studies, a new narrative emerges within US-Mexico borderlands history. This narrative reveals inter-generational legacies of violence among cultural groups that have lived through …

Contributors
Watkinson, Margery Hunt, Fixico, Donald, Cichopek-Gajraj, Anna, et al.
Created Date
2020

Using a sample of 309 Asian American college students, the present study examined the effects of color-blind racial ideology (i.e., unawareness of blatant racial issues, unawareness of racial privilege and unawareness of institutional racism) on the link between internalization of the model minority myth (i.e., unrestricted mobility and achievement orientation) and psychological distress (i.e., social climate stress, interracial stress, within group stress, racism stress and achievement stress). Results primarily suggest the denial of blatant racism and racial issues (and not denial of racial privilege and institutional racism) exacerbate the effect of internalizing the model minority myth related to unrestricted mobility, …

Contributors
Parks, Sarah, Yoo, Hyung Chol, Spanierman, Lisa, et al.
Created Date
2020