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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Autonomous vehicle technology has been evolving for years since the Automated Highway System Project. However, this technology has been under increased scrutiny ever since an autonomous vehicle killed Elaine Herzberg, who was crossing the street in Tempe, Arizona in March 2018. Recent tests of autonomous vehicles on public roads have faced opposition from nearby residents. Before these vehicles are widely deployed, it is imperative that the general public trusts them. For this, the vehicles must be able to identify objects in their surroundings and demonstrate the ability to follow traffic rules while making decisions with human-like moral integrity when confronted …

Contributors
Sankaramangalam Ulhas, Sangeet, Berman, Spring, Johnson, Kathryn, et al.
Created Date
2019

Environmental remote sensing has seen rapid growth in the recent years and Doppler wind lidars have gained popularity primarily due to their non-intrusive, high spatial and temporal measurement capabilities. While lidar applications early on, relied on the radial velocity measurements alone, most of the practical applications in wind farm control and short term wind prediction require knowledge of the vector wind field. Over the past couple of years, multiple works on lidars have explored three primary methods of retrieving wind vectors viz., using homogeneous windfield assumption, computationally extensive variational methods and the use of multiple Doppler lidars. Building on prior …

Contributors
Cherukuru, Nihanth Wagmi, Calhoun, Ronald, Newsom, Rob, et al.
Created Date
2017

Robotic technology is advancing to the point where it will soon be feasible to deploy massive populations, or swarms, of low-cost autonomous robots to collectively perform tasks over large domains and time scales. Many of these tasks will require the robots to allocate themselves around the boundaries of regions or features of interest and achieve target objectives that derive from their resulting spatial configurations, such as forming a connected communication network or acquiring sensor data around the entire boundary. We refer to this spatial allocation problem as boundary coverage. Possible swarm tasks that will involve boundary coverage include cooperative load …

Contributors
Peruvemba Kumar, Ganesh, Berman, Spring M, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2016

In this thesis, a FORTRAN code is rewritten in C++ with an object oriented ap- proach. There are several reasons for this purpose. The first reason is to establish the basis of a GPU programming. To write programs that utilize GPU hardware, CUDA or OpenCL is used which only support C and C++. FORTRAN has a feature that lets its programs to call C/C++ functions. FORTRAN sends relevant data to C/C++, which in turn sends that data to OpenCL. Although this approach works, it makes the code messy and bulky and in the end more difficult to deal with. More- …

Contributors
Safarkhani, Salar, Herrmann, Mrcus, Oswald, Jay, et al.
Created Date
2015

With the ever-increasing demand for high-end services, technological companies have been forced to operate on high performance servers. In addition to the customer services, the company's internal need to store and manage huge amounts of data has also increased their need to invest in High Density Data Centers. As a result, the performance to size of the data center has increased tremendously. Most of the consumed power by the servers is emitted as heat. In a High Density Data Center, the power per floor space area is higher compared to the regular data center. Hence the thermal management of this …

Contributors
Ramaraj, Dineshbalaji, Gupta, Sandeep, Hermann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2015