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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Subject
Date Range
2010 2018


The purpose of this case study is to observe how social dance combined with somatic practices can encourage internal, physical perception and experiences of the body perceived from within for an adolescent boy with high functioning autism and dyspraxia; an impairment or immaturity of the organization of movement (Boon 7). More specifically, this research seeks to observe the impact that social dance instruction can have on an individual’s kinesthetic responsiveness, such as efficiency in movement patterning through increased movement awareness and somatic facilitation. In addition, this study seeks to observe the impact that social dance lessons could have on the ...

Contributors
Peltcs, Diona Rochelle, Dyer, Rebecca, Kaplan, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2018

This document explores a community dance project at an orphanage in Mexico and the investigations following. This project researched how dance can be used to create a transformative and empowering experience for the participant and what discoveries of identity are made through dance. The research took place at an orphanage in Texcoco, Mexico and at Arizona State University. The participants in this research include three dance artists from Arizona State University and 10 ten-year-old children from Mexico. The portion that took place in Mexico was conducted in daily three-hour classes over the span of two weeks. For five months following ...

Contributors
May, Emily Ann, Fitzgerald, Mary, McMahon, Jeff, et al.
Created Date
2016

A Sense Of is a performance-based work that addresses the effects of the transformation of space, time, and energy through the various sensory modes. The work is an invitation to the artist's perspective of the world, which is combined with the performers' creative voices and interpretations of the artist's explorations into sensory awareness. The movement installation entitled A Sense Of was presented in November 2011. This document presents an overview of the project. It addresses relevant literature, examines the creative process used in the work, and provides an analysis of the project as a whole. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Ullom, Kathryn, Standley, Eileen, Fitzgerald, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2012

This thesis examines the integration of somatic principles into Irish Step Dancing. The researcher conducted a twelve week case study that explored how utilizing the Centre-line Support System in training competitive Irish Step Dancers, through integrating Alexander Technique and Bartenieff Fundamentals of Total Body Connectivity can generate increased height and efficiency in jumping and an improvement in upper-body carriage, while longitudinally reducing the occurrence of over-use injuries. Research occurred between January and March 2012 in Tucson, Arizona and Dublin, Ireland. Additional research and reflection occurred in Belfast, Glasgow, and London, United Kingdom; Limerick, Cork, and Galway, Ireland; Amsterdam, The Netherlands; ...

Contributors
Buck, Helen Rose, Vissicaro, Pegge, Hoffner, Kristin, et al.
Created Date
2012

This thesis document encapsulates the findings of my research process in which I studied my self, my artistic process, and the interconnectivity among the various aspects of my life. Those findings are two-fold as they relate to the creation of three original works and my personal transformation through the process. This document encapsulates the three works, swimminginthepsyche, applecede and The 21st Century Adventures of Wonder Woman, chronologically from their performance dates. My personal growth and transformation is expressed throughout the paper and presented in the explanation of the emergent philosophical approach for self-study as creative practice that I followed. This ...

Contributors
Dewitt, Inertia Q.E.D., Mitchell, John D, Dyer, Becky, et al.
Created Date
2013

This thesis aims to explore the language of different bodies in the field of dance by analyzing the habitual patterns of dancers from different backgrounds and vernaculars. Contextually, the term habitual patterns is defined as the postures or poses that tend to re-appear, often unintentionally, as the dancer performs improvisational dance. The focus lies in exposing the movement vocabulary of a dancer to reveal his/her unique fingerprint. The proposed approach for uncovering these movement patterns is to use a clustering technique; mainly k-means. In addition to a static method of analysis, this paper uses an online method of clustering using ...

Contributors
Iyengar, Varsha, Xin Wei, Sha, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2016

This document serves as a discussion of and reflection on the collaborative process of rehearsing and performing arrive, create: a Dance made by Many. My intention for the work was to deconstruct the traditional performance paradigm, focusing on constructing a generous performance atmosphere. During the rehearsal process the cast collectively worked to develop an ensemble dynamic for improvisational dance making. The construct of the performance encouraged the audience to engage with the work, both physically and imaginatively through sensory interaction with objects as well as verbal conversation. This document: recalls my background in dance improvisation; explores the relationship of philosophical ...

Contributors
Wall-Maclane, Laurel Jasmine, Standley, Eileen, Fitzgerald, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2013

My thesis, Asian American and dancing in Arizona; A reflection on the politics of choreographing migration and citizenship in a Red State is a written document that reflects on my creative process of making You don’t belong here, a site-specific, multimedia dance theater piece which I conceived, choreographed, and directed in partial fulfillment of my Master in Fine Arts in Dance degree (MFA) at Arizona State University (ASU) in Tempe, Arizona. I write this reflection from the corporeal perspective of my Asian body. My story comes from my cells that contain the memories of my ancestors, including the recent traumas ...

Contributors
Young, Angeline, Roses-Thema, Dr. Cynthia, Dyer, Dr. Becky, et al.
Created Date
2017

"beautiful secrets," a movement art piece engaging the audience in the art-making, exists in the in-between, an indeterminable place, fluid like the water of Kiwanis Lake. The performers sang, danced and built an architectural environment with the help of the audience to create a transformational place betwixt here and there, day and night, death and life; an in-between land where the language is mystical and symbolic, and the water of Kiwanis Lake served as a symbol of transformation. Beneath the art was a method called Somatic Yoga Dance in which the performers trained in preparation for the performance. Below the ...

Contributors
Garner, Jamey, Jackson, Naomi, Kaplan, Rob, et al.
Created Date
2017

The purpose of my creative research was to analyze my choreographic process and answer the research question: how will implementing somatic principles impact my choreographic process? In determining the impact I analyzed the use of choreographic approaches that bring proprioceptive awareness to interdisciplinary somatic themes of bodily systems, sensing, connectivity, initiation and sequencing. These somatic themes were utilized in movement invention and exploration as well as the structuring and performance of my choreography. Additionally, the research involved clarifying my role as a choreographer and my relationship to the dancers in my work. My creative research occurred in three choreographic phases ...

Contributors
Hillerby, Rebecca Blair, Schupp, Karen, Roses-Thema, Cynthia, et al.
Created Date
2011