ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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2011 2017

The transition to college has been identified as a vulnerable period for weight gain and the onset of obesity. Research has shown that the gut microbiota is different in obese compared to lean individuals, but a period of weight gain has never been studied in free-living individuals. The objective of this longitudinal, observational study was to assess the association between changes in the intestinal microbiota and weight-related outcomes in healthy college students living in on-campus dormitories at Arizona State University (n=39). Anthropometric measures and fecal samples were collected at the beginning and end of the school year, and microbial relative ...

Contributors
Journey, Elizabeth, Whisner, Corrie M, Bruening, Meredith, et al.
Created Date
2017

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) holds potential for significantly impacting the primary caregiver and family, as well as the child with ASD. In particular, sleep problems occur frequently among children with ASD, and their poor sleep may negatively affect that of their caregivers. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and Family Quality of Life (FQoL) are salient indices of caregiver and family well-being. This pilot study explored associations between family caregiver sleep problems and caregiver sense of coherence (SOC) or coping on HRQoL and FQoL. Additionally, this study examined relationships between child sleep and behavior problems on caregiver sleep and well-being. Sixty-two ...

Contributors
Russell, Maureen, Baldwin, Carol, Quan, Stuart F, et al.
Created Date
2014

Background and purpose: Regular physical activity (PA) provides benefits for cognitive health and helps to improve or maintain quality of life among older adults. Objective PA measures have been increasingly used to overcome limitations of self-report measures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of objectively measured PA and sedentary time with cognitive function among older adults. Methods: Participants were recruited from the parent REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. ActicalTM accelerometers provided estimates of PA variables, including moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), high light PA (HLPA), low light PA (LLPA) and sedentary time, for ...

Contributors
Zhu, Wenfei, Hooker, Steven P, Wadley, Virginia, et al.
Created Date
2015

Research indicates that adults are not acquiring enough physical activity. Increasing the use of stairs is an accessible way to weave high intensity physical activity into the daily routine. The purpose of this study is to test the effect of four environmental changes on ascending stair use in a mixed population of college students, faulty, and staff on a southwest college campus. The study design included a 10-week time series design with alternating baseline and intervention phases, including a directional cue represented by footprints on the ground, a positive prompt, a deterrent prompt and a combination phase. Data was collected ...

Contributors
Ford, Marley Rae, Adams, Marc, Der Ananian, Cheryl, et al.
Created Date
2015

The unique anatomical and functional properties of vasculature determine the susceptibility of the spinal cord to ischemia. The spinal cord vascular architecture is designed to withstand major ischemic events by compensating blood supply via important anastomotic channels. One of the important compensatory channels of the arterial basket of the conus medullaris (ABCM). ABCM consists of one or two arteries arising from the anterior spinal artery (ASA) and circumferentially connecting the ASA and the posterior spinal arteries. In addition to compensatory function, the arterial basket can be involved in arteriovenous fistulae and malformations of the conus. The morphometric anatomical analysis of ...

Contributors
Martirosyan, Nikolay, Preul, Mark C, Vernon, Brent, et al.
Created Date
2016

Purpose: To examine: (1) whether Non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB) and Non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) with diagnosed arthritis differed in self-reported physical activity (PA) levels, (2) if NHB and NHW with arthritis differed on potential correlates of PA based on the Social Ecological Model (Mcleroy et al., 1988), and (3) if PA participation varied by race/ethnicity after controlling for age, gender, education, and BMI. Methods: This study was a secondary data analysis of data collected from 2006-2008 in Chicago, IL as part of the Midwest Roybal Center for Health Promotion. Bivariate analyses were used to assess potential differences between race in meeting either ...

Contributors
Churan, Christopher Joseph, Der Ananian, Cheryl, Adams, Marc, et al.
Created Date
2013

Background: Despite the reported improvements in glucose regulation associated with flaxseeds (Linum usitatissimum) few clinical trials have been conducted in diabetic participants. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of ground flaxseed consumption at attenuating hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress as compared to a control in adults with non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetes (T2D). Design: In a randomized parallel arm controlled efficacy trial, participants were asked to consume either 28 g/d ground flaxseed or the fiber-matched control (9 g/d ground psyllium husk) for 8 weeks. The study included 17 adults (9 male, 8 females; 46±14 y; BMI: 31.4±5.7 kg/m2) with a ...

Contributors
Ricklefs, Kristin, Sweazea, Karen L, Johnston, Carol S, et al.
Created Date
2015

Active transportation to school (ATS) has received an increasing amount of attention over the past decade due to its promising health contributions. Most of the existing research that surrounds ATS investigates factors from the physical environment as well as factors from the individual perspective that influence walking and biking to school. This research attempts to add to the existing knowledge by exploring the impact that social relationships within the neighborhood have on ATS. A model, based on social ecological theory, was presented and tested to examine elements thought to influence ATS. A logistic regression analysis was run to determine the ...

Contributors
Ross, Allison, Searle, Mark, Knopf, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2015

The effects of aging on muscular efficiency are controversial. Proponents for increased efficiency suggest that age-related changes in muscle enhance efficiency in senescence. Exercise study results are mixed due to varying modalities, ages, and efficiency calculations. The present study attempted to address oxygen uptake, caloric expenditure, walking economy, and gross/net cycling efficiency in young (18-59 years old) and older (60-81 years old) adults (N=444). Walking was performed at three miles per hour by 86 young (mean = 29.60, standard deviation (SD) = 10.50 years old) and 121 older adults (mean = 66.80, SD = 4.50 years old). Cycling at 50 ...

Contributors
Flores, Michelle Alana, Gaesser, Glenn A, Campbell, Kathryn D, et al.
Created Date
2014

INTRODUCTION: Exercise performed at moderate to vigorous intensities has been shown to generate a post exercise hypotensive response. Whether this response is observed with very low exercise intensities is unclear. PURPOSE: To compare post physical activity ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) response to a single worksite walking day and a normal sedentary work day in pre-hypertensive adults. METHODS: Participants were 7 pre-hypertensive (127 + 8 mmHg / 83 + 8 mmHg) adults (3 male, 4 female, age = 42 + 12 yr) who participated in a randomized, cross-over study that included a control and a walking treatment. Only those who indicated ...

Contributors
Zeigler, Zachary, Swan, Pamela, Buman, Matthew, et al.
Created Date
2013

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.