ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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2012 2017

Public organizations have been interested in tapping into the creativity and passion of the public through the use of open innovation, which emphasizes bottom-up ideation and collaboration. A challenge for organizational adoption of open innovation is that the quick-start, bottom-up, iterative nature of open innovation does not integrate easily into the hierarchical, stability-oriented structure of most organizations. In order to realize the potential of open innovation, organizations must be willing to change the way they operate. This dissertation is a case study of how Arizona State University (ASU), has adapted its organizational structure and created unique programming to incorporate open ...

Contributors
Kelley, Tanya M., Johnston, Erik W, Schugurensky, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2016

By offering increased access to medical care, telemedicine offers significant opportunity for the process of development under Amartya Sen’s definition, that development is freedom, including freedom from illness, early death, and preventable disease. It advances development by freeing people from these burdens. However, like many emerging technologies, organizing information and understanding the field faces significant challenges. This paper applies Bashshur's three-dimensional model of telemedicine to the classification of telemedicine literature found in databases to assess the value of the model as a tool for classification. By standardizing language and creating a repository of research done to date in a centralized ...

Contributors
Blum, Alexander Scott, Parmentier, Mary Jane, Zachary, Gregg, et al.
Created Date
2015

A long tradition of adoption of innovations research in the information systems context suggests that innovative information systems are typically adopted by the largest companies, with the most slack resources and the most management support within competitive markets. Additionally, five behavioral characteristics (relative advantage, compatibility, observability, trialability, and complexity) are typically associated with demand-side adoption. Recent market trends suggest, though, that additional influences and contingencies may also be having a significant impact on adoption of innovative information systems--on both the supply and demand-sides. The primary objective of this dissertation is to extend our theoretical knowledge into a context where consumer ...

Contributors
Baird, Aaron, Santanam, Raghu T, Sinha, Rajiv K, et al.
Created Date
2012

Traditionally, emergency response is in large part the role and responsibility of formal organizations. Advances in information technology enable amateurs or concerned publics to play a meaningful role in emergency response. Indeed, in recent catastrophic disasters or crises such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake and the 2011 Japan earthquake and nuclear crisis, participatory online groups of the general public from both across the globe and the affected areas made significant contributions to the effective response through crowdsourcing vital information and assisting with the allocation of needed resources. Thus, a more integrative lens is needed to understand the responses of various ...

Contributors
Park, Chul Hyun, Johnston, Erik, Schugurensky, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2016

Imagine that we have a piece of matter that can change its physical properties like its shape, density, conductivity, or color in a programmable fashion based on either user input or autonomous sensing. This is the vision behind what is commonly known as programmable matter. Envisioning systems of nano-sensors devices, programmable matter consists of systems of simple computational elements, called particles, that can establish and release bonds, compute, and can actively move in a self-organized way. In this dissertation the feasibility of solving fundamental problems relevant for programmable matter is investigated. As a model for such self-organizing particle systems (SOPS), ...

Contributors
Derakhshandeh, Zahra, Richa, Andrea, Sen, Arunabha, et al.
Created Date
2017

The rapid advancement of wireless technology has instigated the broad deployment of wireless networks. Different types of networks have been developed, including wireless sensor networks, mobile ad hoc networks, wireless local area networks, and cellular networks. These networks have different structures and applications, and require different control algorithms. The focus of this thesis is to design scheduling and power control algorithms in wireless networks, and analyze their performances. In this thesis, we first study the multicast capacity of wireless ad hoc networks. Gupta and Kumar studied the scaling law of the unicast capacity of wireless ad hoc networks. They derived ...

Contributors
Zhou, Shan, Ying, Lei, Zhang, Yanchao, et al.
Created Date
2013

Computational tools in the digital humanities often either work on the macro-scale, enabling researchers to analyze huge amounts of data, or on the micro-scale, supporting scholars in the interpretation and analysis of individual documents. The proposed research system that was developed in the context of this dissertation ("Quadriga System") works to bridge these two extremes by offering tools to support close reading and interpretation of texts, while at the same time providing a means for collaboration and data collection that could lead to analyses based on big datasets. In the field of history of science, researchers usually use unstructured data ...

Contributors
Damerow, Julia, Laubichler, Manfred, Maienschein, Jane, et al.
Created Date
2014

Mobile applications (Apps) markets with App stores have introduced a new approach to define and sell software applications with access to a large body of heterogeneous consumer population. Several distinctive features of mobile App store markets including – (a) highly heterogeneous consumer preferences and values, (b) high consumer cognitive burden of searching a large selection of similar Apps, and (c) continuously updateable product features and price – present a unique opportunity for IS researchers to investigate theoretically motivated research questions in this area. The aim of this dissertation research is to investigate the key determinants of mobile Apps success in ...

Contributors
Lee, Gun Woong, Santanam, Raghu, Gu, Bin, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation examines how young children engage with digital games at home and how parents think and talk about their children's digital gaming. This is an ethnographic case study of the digital game playing of six three-year-old children in six families. This study combines ethnographic methods and critical perspectives to construct analyses that have the potential to rethink young children's digital game play. The focus of this study is on understanding how digital gaming functions in children's everyday lives. This study shows that young children's digital game play takes place in the interstices of their everyday family life. Digital games ...

Contributors
Huh, Youn Jung, Tobin, Joseph, Nakagawa, Kathryn, et al.
Created Date
2015

Children are five times more likely to be overweight at the age of 12 years if they are overweight during the preschool period, and 60% of overweight preschoolers are overweight at the age of 12 years (Matusik & Malecka-Tendera, 2011). Primary care interventions are urgently needed to improve healthy lifestyle behaviors in families. Parental influence plays an important factor in the development of healthy behaviors in children. Cognitive behavioral interventions have demonstrated preliminary success in promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors in both adults and children. Mobile technology used to supplement interventions aimed at behavior change offers an outlet to bridge gaps ...

Contributors
Militello, Lisa Kinsella, Melnyk, Bernadette M, Small, Leigh, et al.
Created Date
2014

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.