ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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2010 2017

As the world embraces a sustainable energy future, alternative energy resources, such as wind power, are increasingly being seen as an integral part of the future electric energy grid. Ultimately, integrating such a dynamic and variable mix of generation requires a better understanding of renewable generation output, in addition to power grid systems that improve power system operational performance in the presence of anticipated events such as wind power ramps. Because of the stochastic, uncontrollable nature of renewable resources, a thorough and accurate characterization of wind activity is necessary to maintain grid stability and reliability. Wind power ramps from an ...

Contributors
Ganger, David Wu, Vittal, Vijay, Zhang, Junshan, et al.
Created Date
2016

Urban growth, from regional sprawl to global urbanization, is the most rapid, drastic, and irreversible form of human modification to the natural environment. Extensive land cover modifications during urban growth have altered the local energy balance, causing the city warmer than its surrounding rural environment, a phenomenon known as an urban heat island (UHI). How are the seasonal and diurnal surface temperatures related to the land surface characteristics, and what land cover types and/or patterns are desirable for ameliorating climate in a fast growing desert city? This dissertation scrutinizes these questions and seeks to address them using a combination of ...

Contributors
Fan, Chao, Myint, Soe W, Li, Wenwen, et al.
Created Date
2016

This article proposes a new information-based subdata selection (IBOSS) algorithm, Squared Scaled Distance Algorithm (SSDA). It is based on the invariance of the determinant of the information matrix under orthogonal transformations, especially rotations. Extensive simulation results show that the new IBOSS algorithm retains nice asymptotic properties of IBOSS and gives a larger determinant of the subdata information matrix. It has the same order of time complexity as the D-optimal IBOSS algorithm. However, it exploits the advantages of vectorized calculation avoiding for loops and is approximately 6 times as fast as the D-optimal IBOSS algorithm in R. The robustness of SSDA ...

Contributors
Zheng, Yi, Stufken, John, Reiser, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2017

The Partition of Variance (POV) method is a simplistic way to identify large sources of variation in manufacturing systems. This method identifies the variance by estimating the variance of the means (between variance) and the means of the variance (within variance). The project shows that the method correctly identifies the variance source when compared to the ANOVA method. Although the variance estimators deteriorate when varying degrees of non-normality is introduced through simulation; however, the POV method is shown to be a more stable measure of variance in the aggregate. The POV method also provides non-negative, stable estimates for interaction when ...

Contributors
Little, David John, Borror, Connie, Montgomery, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2015

Many longitudinal studies, especially in clinical trials, suffer from missing data issues. Most estimation procedures assume that the missing values are ignorable or missing at random (MAR). However, this assumption leads to unrealistic simplification and is implausible for many cases. For example, an investigator is examining the effect of treatment on depression. Subjects are scheduled with doctors on a regular basis and asked questions about recent emotional situations. Patients who are experiencing severe depression are more likely to miss an appointment and leave the data missing for that particular visit. Data that are not missing at random may produce bias ...

Contributors
Zhang, Jun, Reiser, Mark, Barber, Jarrett, et al.
Created Date
2013

Coarsely grouped counts or frequencies are commonly used in the behavioral sciences. Grouped count and grouped frequency (GCGF) that are used as outcome variables often violate the assumptions of linear regression as well as models designed for categorical outcomes; there is no analytic model that is designed specifically to accommodate GCGF outcomes. The purpose of this dissertation was to compare the statistical performance of four regression models (linear regression, Poisson regression, ordinal logistic regression, and beta regression) that can be used when the outcome is a GCGF variable. A simulation study was used to determine the power, type I error, ...

Contributors
Coxe, Stefany Jean, Aiken, Leona S, West, Stephen G, et al.
Created Date
2012

Researchers are often interested in estimating interactions in multilevel models, but many researchers assume that the same procedures and interpretations for interactions in single-level models apply to multilevel models. However, estimating interactions in multilevel models is much more complex than in single-level models. Because uncentered (RAS) or grand mean centered (CGM) level-1 predictors in two-level models contain two sources of variability (i.e., within-cluster variability and between-cluster variability), interactions involving RAS or CGM level-1 predictors also contain more than one source of variability. In this Master’s thesis, I use simulations to demonstrate that ignoring the four sources of variability in a ...

Contributors
Mazza, Gina Lynn, Enders, Craig K., Aiken, Leona S., et al.
Created Date
2015

Obtaining high-quality experimental designs to optimize statistical efficiency and data quality is quite challenging for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The primary fMRI design issue is on the selection of the best sequence of stimuli based on a statistically meaningful optimality criterion. Some previous studies have provided some guidance and powerful computational tools for obtaining good fMRI designs. However, these results are mainly for basic experimental settings with simple statistical models. In this work, a type of modern fMRI experiments is considered, in which the design matrix of the statistical model depends not only on the selected design, but also ...

Contributors
Zhou, Lin, Kao, Ming-hung, Reiser, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2014

This dissertation presents methods for addressing research problems that currently can only adequately be solved using Quality Reliability Engineering (QRE) approaches especially accelerated life testing (ALT) of electronic printed wiring boards with applications to avionics circuit boards. The methods presented in this research are generally applicable to circuit boards, but the data generated and their analysis is for high performance avionics. Avionics equipment typically requires 20 years expected life by aircraft equipment manufacturers and therefore ALT is the only practical way of performing life test estimates. Both thermal and vibration ALT induced failure are performed and analyzed to resolve industry ...

Contributors
Juarez, Joseph Moses, Montgomery, Douglas C., Borror, Connie M., et al.
Created Date
2012

Accurate data analysis and interpretation of results may be influenced by many potential factors. The factors of interest in the current work are the chosen analysis model(s), the presence of missing data, and the type(s) of data collected. If analysis models are used which a) do not accurately capture the structure of relationships in the data such as clustered/hierarchical data, b) do not allow or control for missing values present in the data, or c) do not accurately compensate for different data types such as categorical data, then the assumptions associated with the model have not been met and the ...

Contributors
Kunze, Katie Lynn, Levy, Roy, Enders, Craig K, et al.
Created Date
2016

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.