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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


In this work, I present a Bayesian inference computational framework for the analysis of widefield microscopy data that addresses three challenges: (1) counting and localizing stationary fluorescent molecules; (2) inferring a spatially-dependent effective fluorescence profile that describes the spatially-varying rate at which fluorescent molecules emit subsequently-detected photons (due to different illumination intensities or different local environments); and (3) inferring the camera gain. My general theoretical framework utilizes the Bayesian nonparametric Gaussian and beta-Bernoulli processes with a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, which I further specify and implement for Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy data, benchmarking the method on …

Contributors
Wallgren, Ross Tod, Presse, Steve, Armbruster, Hans, et al.
Created Date
2019

The concept of distribution is one of the core ideas of probability theory and inferential statistics, if not the core idea. Many introductory statistics textbooks pay lip service to stochastic/random processes but how do students think about these processes? This study sought to explore what understandings of stochastic process students develop as they work through materials intended to support them in constructing the long-run behavior meaning for distribution. I collected data in three phases. First, I conducted a set of task-based clinical interviews that allowed me to build initial models for the students’ meanings for randomness and probability. Second, I …

Contributors
Hatfield, Neil, Thompson, Patrick, Carlson, Marilyn, et al.
Created Date
2019

Bayesian Additive Regression Trees (BART) is a non-parametric Bayesian model that often outperforms other popular predictive models in terms of out-of-sample error. This thesis studies a modified version of BART called Accelerated Bayesian Additive Regression Trees (XBART). The study consists of simulation and real data experiments comparing XBART to other leading algorithms, including BART. The results show that XBART maintains BART’s predictive power while reducing its computation time. The thesis also describes the development of a Python package implementing XBART. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Yalov, Saar, Hahn, P. Richard, McCulloch, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2019

Due to large data resources generated by online educational applications, Educational Data Mining (EDM) has improved learning effects in different ways: Students Visualization, Recommendations for students, Students Modeling, Grouping Students, etc. A lot of programming assignments have the features like automating submissions, examining the test cases to verify the correctness, but limited studies compared different statistical techniques with latest frameworks, and interpreted models in a unified approach. In this thesis, several data mining algorithms have been applied to analyze students’ code assignment submission data from a real classroom study. The goal of this work is to explore and predict students’ …

Contributors
Tian, Wenbo, Hsiao, Ihan, Bazzi, Rida, et al.
Created Date
2019

A simulation study was conducted to explore the robustness of general factor mean difference estimation in bifactor ordered-categorical data. In the No Differential Item Functioning (DIF) conditions, the data generation conditions varied were sample size, the number of categories per item, effect size of the general factor mean difference, and the size of specific factor loadings; in data analysis, misspecification conditions were introduced in which the generated bifactor data were fit using a unidimensional model, and/or ordered-categorical data were treated as continuous data. In the DIF conditions, the data generation conditions varied were sample size, the number of categories per …

Contributors
Liu, Yixing, Thompson, Marilyn, Levy, Roy, et al.
Created Date
2019

This thesis presents a family of adaptive curvature methods for gradient-based stochastic optimization. In particular, a general algorithmic framework is introduced along with a practical implementation that yields an efficient, adaptive curvature gradient descent algorithm. To this end, a theoretical and practical link between curvature matrix estimation and shrinkage methods for covariance matrices is established. The use of shrinkage improves estimation accuracy of the curvature matrix when data samples are scarce. This thesis also introduce several insights that result in data- and computation-efficient update equations. Empirical results suggest that the proposed method compares favorably with existing second-order techniques based on …

Contributors
Barron, Trevor Paul, Ben Amor, Heni, He, Jingrui, et al.
Created Date
2019

Functional brain imaging experiments are widely conducted in many fields for study- ing the underlying brain activity in response to mental stimuli. For such experiments, it is crucial to select a good sequence of mental stimuli that allow researchers to collect informative data for making precise and valid statistical inferences at minimum cost. In contrast to most existing studies, the aim of this study is to obtain optimal designs for brain mapping technology with an ultra-high temporal resolution with respect to some common statistical optimality criteria. The first topic of this work is on finding optimal designs when the primary …

Contributors
Alghamdi, Reem, Kao, Ming-Hung, Fricks, John, et al.
Created Date
2019

Optimal design theory provides a general framework for the construction of experimental designs for categorical responses. For a binary response, where the possible result is one of two outcomes, the logistic regression model is widely used to relate a set of experimental factors with the probability of a positive (or negative) outcome. This research investigates and proposes alternative designs to alleviate the problem of separation in small-sample D-optimal designs for the logistic regression model. Separation causes the non-existence of maximum likelihood parameter estimates and presents a serious problem for model fitting purposes. First, it is shown that exact, multi-factor D-optimal …

Contributors
Park, Anson Robert, Montgomery, Douglas C, Mancenido, Michelle V, et al.
Created Date
2019

The problem of multiple object tracking seeks to jointly estimate the time-varying cardinality and trajectory of each object. There are numerous challenges that are encountered in tracking multiple objects including a time-varying number of measurements, under varying constraints, and environmental conditions. In this thesis, the proposed statistical methods integrate the use of physical-based models with Bayesian nonparametric methods to address the main challenges in a tracking problem. In particular, Bayesian nonparametric methods are exploited to efficiently and robustly infer object identity and learn time-dependent cardinality; together with Bayesian inference methods, they are also used to associate measurements to objects and …

Contributors
Moraffah, Bahman, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Bliss, Daniel W., et al.
Created Date
2019

Network analysis is a key conceptual orientation and analytical tool in the social sciences that emphasizes the embeddedness of individual behavior within a larger web of social relations. The network approach is used to better understand the cause and consequence of social interactions which cannot be treated as independent. The relational nature of network data and models, however, amplify the methodological concerns associated with inaccurate or missing data. This dissertation addresses such concerns via three projects. As a motivating substantive example, Project 1 examines factors associated with the selection of interaction partners by students at a large urban high school …

Contributors
Bates, Jordan Taylor, Maroulis, Spiro J, Kang, Yun, et al.
Created Date
2019