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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2012 2018


Bacteriophage (phage) are viruses that infect bacteria. Typical laboratory experiments show that in a chemostat containing phage and susceptible bacteria species, a mutant bacteria species will evolve. This mutant species is usually resistant to the phage infection and less competitive compared to the susceptible bacteria species. In some experiments, both susceptible and resistant bacteria species, as well as phage, can coexist at an equilibrium for hundreds of hours. The current research is inspired by these observations, and the goal is to establish a mathematical model and explore sufficient and necessary conditions for the coexistence. In this dissertation a model with ...

Contributors
Han, Zhun, Smith, Hal, Armbruster, Dieter, et al.
Created Date
2012

Factory production is stochastic in nature with time varying input and output processes that are non-stationary stochastic processes. Hence, the principle quantities of interest are random variables. Typical modeling of such behavior involves numerical simulation and statistical analysis. A deterministic closure model leading to a second order model for the product density and product speed has previously been proposed. The resulting partial differential equations (PDE) are compared to discrete event simulations (DES) that simulate factory production as a time dependent M/M/1 queuing system. Three fundamental scenarios for the time dependent influx are studied: An instant step up/down of the mean ...

Contributors
Wienke, Matthew Richard, Armbruster, Dieter, Jones, Donald, et al.
Created Date
2015

The Kuramoto model is an archetypal model for studying synchronization in groups of nonidentical oscillators where oscillators are imbued with their own frequency and coupled with other oscillators though a network of interactions. As the coupling strength increases, there is a bifurcation to complete synchronization where all oscillators move with the same frequency and show a collective rhythm. Kuramoto-like dynamics are considered a relevant model for instabilities of the AC-power grid which operates in synchrony under standard conditions but exhibits, in a state of failure, segmentation of the grid into desynchronized clusters. In this dissertation the minimum coupling strength required ...

Contributors
Gilg, Brady, Armbruster, Dieter, Mittelmann, Hans, et al.
Created Date
2018

High-order methods are known for their accuracy and computational performance when applied to solving partial differential equations and have widespread use in representing images compactly. Nonetheless, high-order methods have difficulty representing functions containing discontinuities or functions having slow spectral decay in the chosen basis. Certain sensing techniques such as MRI and SAR provide data in terms of Fourier coefficients, and thus prescribe a natural high-order basis. The field of compressed sensing has introduced a set of techniques based on $\ell^1$ regularization that promote sparsity and facilitate working with functions having discontinuities. In this dissertation, high-order methods and $\ell^1$ regularization are ...

Contributors
Denker, Dennis, Gelb, Anne, Archibald, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2016

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) is any medical or public health procedure used before exposure to the disease causing agent, its purpose is to prevent, rather than treat or cure a disease. Most commonly, PrEP refers to an experimental HIV-prevention strategy that would use antiretrovirals to protect HIV-negative people from HIV infection. A deterministic mathematical model of HIV transmission is developed to evaluate the public-health impact of oral PrEP interventions, and to compare PrEP effectiveness with respect to different evaluation methods. The effects of demographic, behavioral, and epidemic parameters on the PrEP impact are studied in a multivariate sensitivity analysis. Most of ...

Contributors
Zhao, Yuqin, Kuang, Yang, Taylor, Jesse, et al.
Created Date
2014

This thesis presents a model for the buying behavior of consumers in a technology market. In this model, a potential consumer is not perfectly rational, but exhibits bounded rationality following the axioms of prospect theory: reference dependence, diminishing returns and loss sensitivity. To evaluate the products on different criteria, the analytic hierarchy process is used, which allows for relative comparisons. The analytic hierarchy process proposes that when making a choice between several alternatives, one should measure the products by comparing them relative to each other. This allows the user to put numbers to subjective criteria. Additionally, evidence suggests that a ...

Contributors
Elkholy, Alexander, Armbruster, Dieter, Kempf, Karl, et al.
Created Date
2014

Modern measurement schemes for linear dynamical systems are typically designed so that different sensors can be scheduled to be used at each time step. To determine which sensors to use, various metrics have been suggested. One possible such metric is the observability of the system. Observability is a binary condition determining whether a finite number of measurements suffice to recover the initial state. However to employ observability for sensor scheduling, the binary definition needs to be expanded so that one can measure how observable a system is with a particular measurement scheme, i.e. one needs a metric of observability. Most ...

Contributors
Ilkturk, Utku, Gelb, Anne, Platte, Rodrigo, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation investigates the classification of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the presence of non-SLE alternatives, while developing novel curve classification methodologies with wide ranging applications. Functional data representations of plasma thermogram measurements and the corresponding derivative curves provide predictors yet to be investigated for SLE identification. Functional nonparametric classifiers form a methodological basis, which is used herein to develop a) the family of ESFuNC segment-wise curve classification algorithms and b) per-pixel ensembles based on logistic regression and fused-LASSO. The proposed methods achieve test set accuracy rates as high as 94.3%, while returning information about regions of the temperature domain ...

Contributors
Buscaglia, Robert, Kamarianakis, Yiannis, Armbruster, Dieter, et al.
Created Date
2018

Need-based transfers (NBTs) are a form of risk-pooling in which binary welfare exchanges occur to preserve the viable participation of individuals in an economy, e.g. reciprocal gifting of cattle among East African herders or food sharing among vampire bats. With the broad goal of better understanding the mathematics of such binary welfare and risk pooling, agent-based simulations are conducted to explore socially optimal transfer policies and sharing network structures, kinetic exchange models that utilize tools from the kinetic theory of gas dynamics are utilized to characterize the wealth distribution of an NBT economy, and a variant of repeated prisoner’s dilemma ...

Contributors
Kayser, Kirk, Armbruster, Dieter, Lampert, Adam, et al.
Created Date
2018

Signaling cascades transduce signals received on the cell membrane to the nucleus. While noise filtering, ultra-sensitive switches, and signal amplification have all been shown to be features of such signaling cascades, it is not understood why cascades typically show three or four layers. Using singular perturbation theory, Michaelis-Menten type equations are derived for open enzymatic systems. When these equations are organized into a cascade, it is demonstrated that the output signal as a function of time becomes sigmoidal with the addition of more layers. Furthermore, it is shown that the activation time will speed up to a point, after which ...

Contributors
Young, Jonathan Trinity, Armbruster, Dieter, Platte, Rodrigo, et al.
Created Date
2013