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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2010 2019


While developing autonomous intelligent robots has been the goal of many research programs, a more practical application involving intelligent robots is the formation of teams consisting of both humans and robots. An example of such an application is search and rescue operations where robots commanded by humans are sent to environments too dangerous for humans. For such human-robot interaction, natural language is considered a good communication medium as it allows humans with less training about the robot's internal language to be able to command and interact with the robot. However, any natural language communication from the human needs to be …

Contributors
Lumpkin, Barry Thomas, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2012

Natural Language Processing is a subject that combines computer science and linguistics, aiming to provide computers with the ability to understand natural language and to develop a more intuitive human-computer interaction. The research community has developed ways to translate natural language to mathematical formalisms. It has not yet been shown, however, how to automatically translate different kinds of knowledge in English to distinct formal languages. Most of the recent work presents the problem that the translation method aims to a specific formal language or is hard to generalize. In this research, I take a first step to overcome this difficulty …

Contributors
Alvarez Gonzalez, Marcos, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2010

Answer Set Programming (ASP) is one of the most prominent and successful knowledge representation paradigms. The success of ASP is due to its expressive non-monotonic modeling language and its efficient computational methods originating from building propositional satisfiability solvers. The wide adoption of ASP has motivated several extensions to its modeling language in order to enhance expressivity, such as incorporating aggregates and interfaces with ontologies. Also, in order to overcome the grounding bottleneck of computation in ASP, there are increasing interests in integrating ASP with other computing paradigms, such as Constraint Programming (CP) and Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT). Due to the …

Contributors
Meng, Yunsong, Lee, Joohyung, Ahn, Gail-Joon, et al.
Created Date
2013

Question Answering has been under active research for decades, but it has recently taken the spotlight following IBM Watson's success in Jeopardy! and digital assistants such as Apple's Siri, Google Now, and Microsoft Cortana through every smart-phone and browser. However, most of the research in Question Answering aims at factual questions rather than deep ones such as ``How'' and ``Why'' questions. In this dissertation, I suggest a different approach in tackling this problem. We believe that the answers of deep questions need to be formally defined before found. Because these answers must be defined based on something, it is better …

Contributors
Vo, Nguyen Ha, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2015

Different logic-based knowledge representation formalisms have different limitations either with respect to expressivity or with respect to computational efficiency. First-order logic, which is the basis of Description Logics (DLs), is not suitable for defeasible reasoning due to its monotonic nature. The nonmonotonic formalisms that extend first-order logic, such as circumscription and default logic, are expressive but lack efficient implementations. The nonmonotonic formalisms that are based on the declarative logic programming approach, such as Answer Set Programming (ASP), have efficient implementations but are not expressive enough for representing and reasoning with open domains. This dissertation uses the first-order stable model semantics, …

Contributors
Palla, Ravi Kiran Reddy, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2012

LPMLN is a recent probabilistic logic programming language which combines both Answer Set Programming (ASP) and Markov Logic. It is a proper extension of Answer Set programs which allows for reasoning about uncertainty using weighted rules under the stable model semantics with a weight scheme that is adopted from Markov Logic. LPMLN has been shown to be related to several formalisms from the knowledge representation (KR) side such as ASP and P-Log, and the statistical relational learning (SRL) side such as Markov Logic Networks (MLN), Problog and Pearl’s causal models (PCM). Formalisms like ASP, P-Log, Problog, MLN, PCM have all …

Contributors
Talsania, Samidh, Lee, Joohyung, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2017

The goal of fact checking is to determine if a given claim holds. A promising ap- proach for this task is to exploit reference information in the form of knowledge graphs (KGs), a structured and formal representation of knowledge with semantic descriptions of entities and relations. KGs are successfully used in multiple appli- cations, but the information stored in a KG is inevitably incomplete. In order to address the incompleteness problem, this thesis proposes a new method built on top of recent results in logical rule discovery in KGs called RuDik and a probabilistic extension of answer set programs called …

Contributors
Pradhan, Anish, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2018

Image Understanding is a long-established discipline in computer vision, which encompasses a body of advanced image processing techniques, that are used to locate (“where”), characterize and recognize (“what”) objects, regions, and their attributes in the image. However, the notion of “understanding” (and the goal of artificial intelligent machines) goes beyond factual recall of the recognized components and includes reasoning and thinking beyond what can be seen (or perceived). Understanding is often evaluated by asking questions of increasing difficulty. Thus, the expected functionalities of an intelligent Image Understanding system can be expressed in terms of the functionalities that are required to …

Contributors
Aditya, Somak, Baral, Chitta, Yang, Yezhou, et al.
Created Date
2018

Answer Set Programming (ASP) is one of the main formalisms in Knowledge Representation (KR) that is being widely applied in a large number of applications. While ASP is effective on Boolean decision problems, it has difficulty in expressing quantitative uncertainty and probability in a natural way. Logic Programs under the answer set semantics and Markov Logic Network (LPMLN) is a recent extension of answer set programs to overcome the limitation of the deterministic nature of ASP by adopting the log-linear weight scheme of Markov Logic. This thesis investigates the relationships between LPMLN and two other extensions of ASP: weak constraints …

Contributors
Yang, Zhun, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2017

Current work in planning assumes that user preferences and/or domain dynamics are completely specified in advance, and aims to search for a single solution plan to satisfy these. In many real world scenarios, however, providing a complete specification of user preferences and domain dynamics becomes a time-consuming and error-prone task. More often than not, a user may provide no knowledge or at best partial knowledge of her preferences with respect to a desired plan. Similarly, a domain writer may only be able to determine certain parts, not all, of the model of some actions in a domain. Such modeling issues …

Contributors
Nguyen, Tuan Anh, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2014